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Chrome murders FTP like Jeffrey Epstein

Filed under
Google
Web

What is it with these people? Why can't things that are working be allowed to still go on working? (Blah blah insecure blah blah unused blah blah maintenance blah blah web everything.)

This leaves an interesting situation where Google has, in its very own search index, HTML pages served by FTP its own browser won't be able to view...

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A Collection Of The Ultimate Web Browsers For Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Web browsers are vital if you're going to have any sort of online experience on your computer. There are hundreds of choices out there, as well as the standard browser which will come pre-installed on your computer, but that's often not the best choice, and it can be quite an intimidating task to sift through every dodgy review site on the internet to try and find the right browser for you. Ending up with a Downloads folder filled with installers and a desktop littered with icons isn't what you want or need, so this collection of web browsers for Ubuntu should be able to help you decide on which one you want before you go and download every single browser available on the internet.

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Top 4 Best Blogging Software for Linux in 2019

Filed under
Software
Web

In the last few years, blogging has become a popular way of sharing one’s thoughts about almost anything. While people use blogs to express themselves, businesses go with blogging to cement their position as a competent authority in their area of operations. Over the past years, many have taken on blogging as various blogging software makes it as simple and straightforward as possible. Now, you can create a blog site even if you lack technical skills such as coding and web development.

Today, blogging software is being created for every operating system, not just for Windows and Mac. Since bloggers who want to make themselves heard are using different operating systems, it is essential to help you identify the best blogging software for Linux as well. Here are the top four blogging software for Linux.

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Also: RV Offsite Backup Update

Daniel Stenberg: more tiny curl

Filed under
Software
Web

Without much fanfare or fireworks we put together and shipped a fresh new version of tiny-curl. We call it version 0.10 and it is based on the 7.65.3 curl tree.

tiny-curl is a patch set to build curl as tiny as possible while still being able to perform HTTPS GET requests and maintaining the libcurl API. Additionally, tiny-curl is ported to FreeRTOS.

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Daniel Stenberg: First HTTP/3 with curl

Filed under
Software
Web

In the afternoon of August 5 2019, I successfully made curl request a document over HTTP/3, retrieve it and then exit cleanly again.

(It got a 404 response code, two HTTP headers and 10 bytes of content so the actual response was certainly less thrilling to me than the fact that it actually delivered that response over HTTP version 3 over QUIC.)

The components necessary for this to work, if you want to play along at home, are reasonably up-to-date git clones of curl itself and the HTTP/3 library called quiche (and of course quiche’s dependencies too, like boringssl), then apply pull-request 4193 (build everything accordingly) and run a command line like:

curl --http3-direct https://quic.tech:8443

The host name used here (“quic.tech”) is a server run by friends at Cloudflare and it is there for testing and interop purposes and at the time of this test it ran QUIC draft-22 and HTTP/3.

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Chrome 76

Filed under
Google
Software
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 76 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.
    Chrome 76.0.3809.87 contains a number of fixes and improvements -- a list of changes is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 76.

  • Chrome 76 Released With Flash Blocked By Default

    Google today promoted their Chrome 76 web-browser to stable for all supported platforms, including Linux.

    The Chrome 76 release isn't the most exciting update in recent times, but is notable for now no longer auto-loading Flash content when Flash is active/available to the browser. It's another step towards eliminating Flash on the web.

  • Chrome 76 arrives with Flash blocked by default, detecting Incognito mode disabled, and PWA improvements

    Google today launched Chrome 76 for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS. The release includes Adobe Flash blocked by default, Incognito mode detection disabled, multiple PWA improvements, and more developer features. You can update to the latest version now using Chrome’s built-in updater or download it directly from google.com/chrome.

5 open-source Firefox alternatives for Linux users

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Mozilla Firefox is an excellent open-source web browser, perhaps one of the best tools on the entire Linux platform. Still, the Firefox browser is adding more and more features, and these new additions aren’t for everyone. If you’re looking for an open-source alternative to Firefox on Linux, we’ve got you covered. Here are 5 open-source Firefox alternatives for Linux users.

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PHP 7.4 Beta

Filed under
Web

GNUnet 0.11.6 released

Filed under
GNU
Web

This is a bugfix release for 0.11.5, fixing a lot of minor bugs, improving stability and code quality. Further, our videos are back on the homepage. In this release, we again improved the webpage in general and updated our documentation. As always: In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny (about 200 peers) and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.11.6 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance.

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Google, Money and Censorship in Free Software communities

Filed under
Google
Web
Debian

Alexander Wirt (formorer) has tried to justify censoring the mailing list in various ways. Wirt is also one of Debian's GSoC administrators and mentors, it appears he has a massive conflict of interest when censoring posts about Google.

Wirt has also made public threats to censor other discussions, for example, the DebConf Israel debate. The challenges of holding a successful event in that particular region require a far more mature approach.

Why are these donations and conflicts of interest hidden from the free software community who rely on, interact with contribute to Debian in so many ways? Why doesn't Debian provide a level playing field, why does money from Google get this veil of secrecy?

[...]

Google also operates a mailing list for mentors in Google Summer of Code. It looks a lot like any other free software community mailing list except for one thing: censorship.

Look through the "Received" headers of messages on the mailing list and you can find examples of messages that were delayed for some hours waiting for approval. It is not clear how many messages were silently censored, never appearing at all.

Recent attempts to discuss the issue on Google's own mailing list produced an unsurprising result: more censorship.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: New PHP Builds, End-to-End Encryption for Kubernetes Applications, Interns

  • PHP version 7.2.22RC1 and 7.3.9RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages. RPM of PHP version 7.3.9RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 28-29 and Enterprise Linux. RPM of PHP version 7.2.22RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 28-29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Self-Serviced, End-to-End Encryption for Kubernetes Applications, Part 2: a Practical Example

    In part one of this series, we saw three approaches to fully automate the provisioning of certificates and create end-to-end encryption. Based on feedback from the community suggesting the post was a bit too theoretical and not immediately actionable, this article will illustrate a practical example. You can see a recording of the demo here.

  • The Tiger that interned at Red Hat

    From the start, Tiger just had the right idea about looking for a college. Instead of reading US World News’ rankings, basing his decisions on sports teams, or even aiming for the Ivy Leagues, Tiger set out to make his college search a data driven effort. He asked himself, first, where he wanted to work. For him, that was an almost typical answer for an aspiring young technology student: Google, Facebook, Red Hat and other big name tech firms. [...] Tiger's real name is Passawit Kaovilai, and he's now entering his third year at NC State. He said that many people in his native Thailand have nicknames, and that his translates well into any language, and is understood immediately. He was also born in the year of the tiger, so the name is a natural fit. Here at Red Hat, Tiger has taken on the duties of a technical marketing intern. That means he's been diving into Red Hat OpenShift 4 to help create documentation and learning tools for users in the field. That also means contributing to open source projects, and getting his handle out there on GitHub, however modestly.

Latest KDE Security Vulnerabilities Are Patched in Ubuntu and Debian, Update Now

A couple of weeks ago, the KDE community fixed a security vulnerability discovered by Dominik Penner in the KConfig component, the configuration settings framework of the KDE Plasma desktop environment, which could allow an attacker to execute malicious code through a specially crafted .desktop file included in an archive that was opened in the file manager. "Dominik Penner discovered that KConfig supported a feature to define shell command execution in .desktop files. If a user is provided with a malformed .desktop file (e.g. if it's embedded into a downloaded archive and it gets opened in a file browser) arbitrary commands could get executed. This update removes this feature," reads the Debian security advisory. Read more

Google brings Linux app support to some older Chromebooks (including Chromebook Pixel 2015)

Chrome OS started out as a browser-based operating system that could run web apps only. Eventually Google added support for Android apps, and then for Linux apps, making Chromebooks more useful as general-purpose laptops. But while most new Chromebooks feature out-of-the-box support for Android and Linux apps, many older models do not… and it looked like they never would. It turns out that may not be true after all: 9to5Google reports that Google seems to be testing an update that would bring Linux app support to the 2015 Chromebook Pixel, along with a number of other models released that year. Read more

Devices With Linux