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FOSS content management systems (CMS)

Filed under
OSS
Drupal
Web
  • How to Resolve Your Open Content Management Quandary

    After years of development and competition, open source content management systems (CMS) have proliferated and are very powerful tools for building, deploying and managing web sites, blogs and more. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla.

    As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue. The good news is that free, sophisticated guides for evaluating CMS systems have flourished. There are even good options for trying open CMS systems online before you choose one. Here, in this newly updated post, you'll find some very good resources.

    he first thing to pursue as you evaluate CMS systems to deploy, including the many free, good platforms, is an overview of what is available. CMSMatrix.org is a great site for plotting out side-by-side comparisons of what CMS systems have to offer. In fact, it lets you compare the features in over 1200 content management system products. Definitely take a look. This site also has a good overview of the options.

  • Postleaf is an open-source blogging platform for the design-conscious

    Content management systems are boring until you have to use one. You can install a little Drupal or WordPress, pick up some Squarespace, or just dump to Medium, the graveyard for posts about protein shakes and VC funding. But what if you could roll your own CMS? And what if you made it really cool?

    That’s what Cory LaViska did. LaViska is the founder of SurrealCMS and has been making it easy to edit stuff on the web for nine years. Rather than build and sell an acceptable CMS, however, he took all of his best ideas and made a far better CMS. And he made it open source and called it Postleaf.

Death of Adobe Trash (Flash)

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome to make Flash mostly-dead in early December [Ed: but do we replace one blob with another? (Chrome is proprietary)]

    Google yesterday set an early December deadline for purging most Flash content from its Chrome browser, adding that it will take an interim step next month when it stops rendering Flash-based page analytics.

    In a post to a company blog, Anthony LaForge, a technical program manager on the Chrome team, said the browser would refuse to display virtually all Flash content starting with version 55, which is scheduled for release the week of Dec. 5.

    Previously, Google had used a broader deadline of this year's fourth quarter for quashing all Flash content except for that produced by a select list of 10 sites, including Amazon, Facebook and YouTube.

  • Google Chrome's plan to kill Flash kicks into high gear

    Google is getting serious about ending the reign of Adobe Flash on the web.

    The company recently detailed a timeline for bringing Flash on Chrome to an end—kind of. Even in these late stages of Flash’s life on the web you still can’t kill it off entirely. Instead, Google says it will “de-emphasize” Flash to the point where it’s almost never used except when absolutely necessary.

  • HTML5 Wins: Google Chrome Is Officially Killing Flash Next Month

    With an aim to bring security, better battery life, and faster load times, Google is de-emphasizing Flash next month. After this change in Chrome 53, the behind-the-scenes Flash will be blocked in favor of HTML5. Later, with Chrome 55, HTML5 will be made the default choice while loading a web page.

Web Sites' FOSS

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Govstrap.io enables rapid deployment of UK government websites

    United Kingdom government websites can now be deployed within minutes by re-using the familiar theme produced by Government Digital Services (GDS) in combination with the Bootstrap framework.

    The open source software specialist OpusVL has made it possible to take the official Gov.UK website theme, which is under the MIT license, and reproduce it quickly and easily using Bootstrap, which originated from Twitter. Bootstrap is an HTML, CSS, and JavaScript framework for creating front end websites and applications. With an increase in the variety of devices used to view websites, Bootstrap is a standard tool kit for building responsive design, and enabling websites to be mobile- and tablet-friendly.

  • Concrete5 Releases Version 8 Beta, More Open Source CMS News

    Portland, Ore.-based concrete5 released its version 8 beta for testing and feedback. It's good for site builders who are comfortable reporting and fixing bugs, and who are prepared to build their test sites from scratch. Just remember: Beta releases are never recommended for production websites.

    Technology evangelist Jessica Dunbar called it "a key milestone and is the work of more than 230 contributors." To find out about the new features, see what’s in store for version 8.

Qt WebBrowser 1.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

We have recently open sourced Qt WebBrowser!

Read more

Also: Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer

Filed under
Linux
Server
Web
HowTos

Welcome to small tutorial series of hosting website on Linux machine. This series of articles will teach how to setup a web server on Linux computer and make it available online. The website we'll host on our personal computer can be accessed from around the globe. In this article(Part 1), we are going to install all the required tools to setup web server. So let's get started and start our own setup web server. ​

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Web browsers for GNU/Linux

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Web
  • Best Graphical Web Browsers for Linux

    Web Browsers is one of the top most contributor of Computer desktops. As we know, we can’t do any work in system without browser help like, for browsing something, checking mails, net banking access, chatting, etc.., here I’m going to show you modern web browsers which is in active, under development and widely using in Linux Desktops.

  • Latest Vivaldi Browser Snapshot Improves Tab Hibernation on GNU/Linux Distros

    Today, July 11, 2016, Vivaldi released a new snapshot version for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows, bringing multiple fixes and improvements.

Web Browsers

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • WebVR Shell: Google Is Making Every Website On The Web Viewable In VR

    Boosting its efforts in the virtual reality technology, Google has brought the WebVR APIs to its Chrome web browser. In near future, one should expect a richer web full of VR-enabled websites that a person can explore using a VR headset.

  • Context Graph: It’s time to bring context back to the web

    The largest button on a modern browser is the back button. Trips to the web are short. Enter a search, get a result, click back, then try again. This feels backwards (forgive the pun!). What if there was a better forward button? One that helps you understand a topic better or find alternative solutions to a problem you’re solving? What if web browsers were immediately useful instead of demanding input when you launched them? Browsers could do so much more, through a better understanding of your behavior and by using the experience of people at human-scale to give you content that enriches your life, regardless of whom you know or where you live.

  • Mozilla Is Looking To Build A Recommendation System: Context Graph

    If Mozilla didn't already have their hands full with enough projects, the latest they are looking to engage in is a recommendation system to potentially upset the likes of Facebook and Google when it comes to looking for similar sites/resources.

  • This Coder Shows How To Play Games Inside A PDF File

    A GitHub user named Omar Rizwan has found a way to put games in PDF files. He even coded his own game after taking help from a tutorial. Rizwan has put the details of this Horrifying PDF Experiments on his repository.

Servo Nightly for GNU/Linux

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Moz/FF
Web
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • Wayland ♡ drawing tablets
    So this is finally happening. The result of much work all through the stack from several dedicated individuals (You know who you are!) started lining up during the past few months and now is hitting master. Early in the cycle I blogged about stylus support being merged, based on the first version of the tablet protocols. Now I have the pleasure to declare GTK+ tablet support on Wayland feature complete.
  • GNOME/GTK Support For Drawing Tablets On Wayland Is Feature Complete
    In time for next month's GNOME 3.22 release, the drawing tablet support for GNOME on Wayland is getting into shape. GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho wrote today how it's "finally happening" that good support for drawing tablets when running GNOME on Wayland is becoming a reality. Carlos declares that the GTK+ tablet support on Wayland is considered feature complete.
  • Mutter Window Manager Updated for GNOME 3.22 with Virtual Input Device Support
    GNOME Project's Florian Müllner announced the release of the Beta build of the upcoming Mutter window and compositing manager for the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment. As reported by us earlier today, the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment entered Beta stages of development, which means that most of its core components and applications have been updated to this Beta release, including Mutter, which is in charge of displaying and managing your GNOME desktop via OpenGL (accelerated 3D graphics).

KDE Leftovers

  • KDE Plasma 5.7.4 Released
    KDE Plasma 5.7.4 fixes dragging items in Kickoff, mouse settings now apply to applications using kdelibs4, and there is improved handling of CRTC screen information. There are also a number of KWin fixes (including one Wayland fix), Plasma desktop tweaks, and more.
  • QtCon Keynote: Software as a Public Service
    QtCon is happy to welcome Julia Reda, the closing keynote speaker. Member of the European Parliament for the Pirate Party and Vice-Chair of the Greens/European Free Alliance. Reda's legislative focus is on copyright and internet policy issues. As a member of the European Parliament and together with Max Andersson, Julia Reda initiated the pilot project “Governance and quality of software code – Auditing of free and open source software” in 2014 as a reaction to the so-called “heartbleed” bug in OpenSSL. The idea turned into the pilot-project "Free and Open Source Software Auditing“ (FOSSA) that is aiming at improving the security of those Free Software programs that are in use by the European Commission and the Parliament.
  • KScreen-Doctor Will Help KDE Developers Improve Multi-Screen Plasma
    Also helping KDE developers in their multi-screen efforts is a centralized activity log in KScreen with Plasma 5.8 and the ability to easily create virtual screens in Wayland for reproducing issues without real hardware.
  • Multisceen in Plasma: Improved tools and debugging
    Plasma 5.8 will be our first long-term supported release in the Plasma 5 series. We want to make this a release as polished and stable as possible. One area we weren’t quite happy with was our multi-screen user experience. While it works quite well for most of our users, there were a number of problems which made our multi-screen support sub-par. Let’s take a step back to define what we’re talking about.

Linux Graphics

EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & NILFS2 HDD File-System Tests On Linux 4.8 (and More Linux Kernel News)

Up until running the tests for today's article, I can't remember the last time I touched a hard drive... It's been many months ago at least. Nearly all of our tests at Phoronix are from solid state storage, but I decided to pick up a new HDD for running some Linux file-system tests on a conventional hard drive for those not having an SSD. Via NewEgg.com I saw a good deal on a refurbished Hitachi Ultrastar HUA72302 "Enterprise" Hard Drive with 2TB of storage, 7200 RPM, 64MB cache, Serial ATA 3.0, and backed by HGST with a five-year warranty. For just over $30 USD it was a deal and decided to order it for running some modern Linux HDD file-system tests for curiosity sake. Read more Also: What's Been Going On With CPUFreq & The Scheduler Polychromatic Provides A Nice UI To Razer Keyboards/Mice On Linux