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Mozilla and Chrome Issues

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Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 92 on POWER

    Firefox 92 is out. Alongside some solid DOM and CSS improvements, the most interesting bug fix I noticed was a patch for open alerts slowing down other tabs in the same process. In the absence of a JIT we rely heavily on Firefox's multiprocessor capabilities to make the most of our multicore beasts, and this apparently benefits (among others, but in particular) the Google sites we unfortunately have to use in these less-free times. I should note for the record that on this dual-8 Talos II (64 hardware threads) I have dom.ipc.processCount modestly increased to 12 from the default of 8 to take a little more advantage of the system when idle, which also takes down fewer tabs in the rare cases when a content process bombs out. The delay in posting this was waiting for the firefox-appmenu patches, but I decided to just build it now and add those in later. The .mozconfigs and LTO-PGO patches are unchanged from Firefox 90/91.

  • Mozilla bypasses Microsoft, makes it easier to set Firefox as default browser in Windows

    Changing the default apps such as browsers in Microsoft Windows 10 is not a straightforward process. While this means that users have to jump through extra hoops to set up, let's say, Mozilla Firefox as their default browser, it also means that vendors such as Mozilla face more competition from Microsoft's own offering, which is Edge. The bad news is that in Windows 11, this is becoming even more cumbersome for end-users and vendors as the OS requires users to change the default browser for each type of extension individually.

  • Firefox 94 will change the output for X11 to use EGL by default

    A nightly builds build that will on the Firefox 94 release to added to the change has been include a new rendering backend by default for graphical environments that use the X11 protocol. The new backend is notable for the use of the interface for displaying graphics EGL instead of GLX. The backend supports the open source Mesa 21.x OpenGL drivers and the proprietary NVIDIA 470.x drivers. AMD proprietary OpenGL drivers are not yet supported.

    "A nightly builds build that will on the #Firefox 94 release to added to the change has been include a new rendering backend by default for graphical environments that use the X11 protocol." https://www.itsfoss.net/firefox-94-will-change-the-output-for-x11-to-use-egl-by-default/

  • Chrome update 93.0.4577.82 fixing 0-day vulnerabilities

    Google has formed a Chrome 93.0.4577.82 update, which fixes 11 vulnerabilities, including two issues already used by hackers exploits (0-day). The details have not yet been disclosed, it is only known that the first vulnerability (CVE-2021-30632) is caused by an error leading to an out-of-buffer write in the V8 JavaScript engine, and the second problem (CVE-2021-30633) is present in the Indexed DB API implementation and is connected with access to the memory area after its release (use-after-free).

  • Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome

    Google has released Chrome version 93.0.4577.82 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This version addresses vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit to take control of an affected system.

visurf, a web browser based on NetSurf

Filed under
Web

I’ve started a new side project that I would like to share with you: visurf. visurf, or nsvi, is a NetSurf frontend which provides vi-inspired key bindings and a lightweight Wayland UI with few dependencies. It’s still a work-in-progress, and is not ready for general use yet. I’m letting you know about it today in case you find it interesting and want to help.

NetSurf is a project which has been on my radar for some time. It is a small web browser engine, developed in C independently of the lineage of WebKit and Gecko which defines the modern web today. It mostly supports HTML4 and CSS2, plus only a small amount of HTML5 and CSS3. Its JavaScript support, while present, is very limited. Given the epidemic of complexity in the modern web, I am pleased by the idea of a small browser, more limited in scope, which perhaps requires the cooperation of like-minded websites to support a pleasant experience.

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Here’s Why Firefox is Seeing a Continuous Decline for Last 12 Years

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Moz/FF
Web

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the decline of the Firefox browser and numerous articles about it losing 50 Million users in the last two years.

But the real decline has been over 12 years with a total loss of half a Billion users and 75% of the market share it once held.

It all started in 2009 Q3 with the fateful decision to force…

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Alternative Linux Browsers for Linux

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Web

Browsing the Internet is the most common use of computers these days. The Internet has become a part of our daily lives, and imagining a life without it does seem difficult. To browse the Internet, there are specially designed applications called “web browsers”. There are several web browsers such as Opera, Chrome, Firefox, etc., available. And, as is the case with all technology, some are better than others.
For Linux Distros, Mozilla Firefox is built-in and available for use on installing the OS. Mozilla Firefox is considered to be an excellent web browser, and most users are satisfied with it. However, options are available for users who want to use or prefer using another web browser rather than Firefox.

Consider Google Chrome, the outright most used web browser in the world. Being affiliated with Google makes Chrome an attractive and easy-to-use browser. Add to it the various plug-ins and add-ons; it does become the superior choice.

In the case of Opera, some users prefer using it over others. Opera is also a user-friendly and easy-to-use web browser. Recently, Opera has introduced a VPN feature which has helped its prospects even further.

So, if you are looking to find an alternative web browser for your Linux system, you have come to the right place as this article will be explaining the steps to install different web browsers and which browser is the best choice.

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Forget Firefox, Vivaldi Steals Default Browser Spot In Popular Linux Distro

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Moz/FF
Web

Arch-based Linux distribution Manjaro is no stranger to making bold decisions that may or may not ruffle the community’s collective feathers. In 2019 it disrupted the status quo by replacing LibreOffice with FreeOffice as the default office software (and then decided to give users a choice during OS installation). Today, Manjaro is orchestrating another upheaval: it’s replacing its default web browser.

Firefox is out. Vivaldi is in.

“In our repos, Manjaro always provides the very latest version of Vivaldi, and thanks to direct developer contact we are now also able to include matching default themes for our editions,” says Co-CEO of Manjaro GmbH & Co. KG, Bernhard Landauer. “To give Vivaldi more of the attention it deserves, I decided to include it as the default browser in our popular Cinnamon Community Edition. With its remarkable browsing speed, exceptional customizability, and especially the way it values user privacy, Vivaldi for me is a perfect match for Manjaro Linux.”

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Best 18 Open-source Flat-File CMSs in 2021

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Server
Web

A Flat-file CMS is a content management system that does not use any database, in other term "Databaseless". It stores its content in text files like: Markdown, TXT, JSON or even XML.

In this article, we listed a neat collection of Flat-file publishing systems which serve many purposes starting from blogging, documentation projects to enterprise websites.

I have always been fascinated by databaseless solutions, which I tend to use and recommend to my clients, and flat-file CMSs are not an exception.

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Best Web Browsers for Ubuntu and Other Linux Distributions

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Web
Ubuntu

There is no such thing as the perfect web browser. It all depends on what you prefer and what you use it for.

But, what are your best options when it comes to web browsers for Linux?

In this article, I try to highlight the best web browsers that you can pick for Ubuntu and other Linux.

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7 Open-Source CMS WordPress Alternatives

Filed under
Software
Web

Looking for a WordPress alternative to build your website? Look no further. This article will show you other Content Management Systems (CMS) you can use to build your site.

Creating a website is a lot of work; there's the aspects of designing, coding, and constantly updating your site. However, with a CMS, it doesn't have to be the case.

A Content Management System is a software application that helps you build and manage a website without calling for prior coding ability. The most popular CMS is WordPress, and it accounts for 40% of websites on the internet. However, it's not the only CMS.

There are other alternatives that you can use to build your website. This article will show you 7 open-source CMS you can use to create your website or blog.

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Release of Chrome 93

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 93 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

    Chrome 93.0.4577.63 contains a number of fixes and improvements -- a list of changes is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 93.

  • Google rolling out Chrome 93 on Mac, Windows, Android, iOS - 9to5Google

    Following version 92’s release on Android, Mac, Windows, and Linux, the next release of Google’s browser is rolling out. Chrome 93 is here today as a smaller update.

  • Chrome 93 Released With WebOTP Cross-Device Support, CSS Module Scripts - Phoronix

    Google is shipping Chrome 93 today as the latest stable version of their web browser.

    Chrome 93 brings WebOTP API cross-device support to the desktop where if connected via the same Google Account across devices can seamlessly handle one-time pass-codes sent to your mobile device. Chrome 93 on the developer front also exposes the Multi-Screen Window Placement API. This new API makes it easier to manage several displays and can be used for use-cases like presentations where one display may be showing a slide deck while another display is showing the speaker notes, managing multiple windows for tool panes like for image and video editors, or virtual trading desks with showing multiple related windows. With Chrome 93 this new Multi-Screen window Placement API is exposed as an origin trial.

Google Work on Graphics/GPUs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Google
Web
  • Chrome 94 Beta Released With WebCodecs API Promoted, WebGPU Origin Trial

    Google promoted Chrome 94 to beta status today with some exciting changes.

    First up, Chrome 94 Beta marks the completion of the WebCodecs API under its origin trial and thus now officially available. WebCodecs is the low-level codec API around audio/video encoding and decoding along with raw video frame handling and more. WebCodecs API handling is intended to be more efficient than JavaScript or WebAssembly codec implementations.

  • Google Working On Making VirtIO-GPU More Extensible

    Google Chrome OS engineers are working on making Linux's VirtIO-GPU driver more extensible. The VirtIO-GPU driver has been modeled around the Virgl protocol for handling 3D within guest virtual machines but with a new context type addition they aim to support additional protocols.

    With the proposed "context type" addition to VirtIO-GPU, multiple different protocols could be supported for allowing GPU communication between the guest VM and the host. Virgl could still be supported alongside other protocols like GFXSTREAM rendering commands for OpenGL or Vulkan and more rather than artificially limiting VirtIO-GPU to the Virgl use-case.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3