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Top 5 Lightweight Web Browsers for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Web

Various Linux distributions provide a number of lightweight browsers that can easily run without eating up too much of your machine’s memory. So, without any further ado, here are Top 5 Lightweight Web Browsers that you can use on your Linux System.

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An Epiphany regarding Purebrowser

Filed under
Web

As most folks know, PureOS has a customized browser known as Purebrowser. Purebrowser is a great example of what Todd Weaver calls, “the power of defaults”. What I’ve understood that to mean is that default settings are a powerful way to provide users with privacy protecting safeguards and convenience “out of the box”. The goal with sane defaults was always to make life easier for our users by making choices that we believe protect privacy so that the user wouldn’t have to dig into confusing configuration options. We try and bring sensible, privacy protecting default settings to our Purebrowser each time there is a new release from upstream which is the Firefox Extended Support Release. Our customization begins with the choice of browser to start with and it continues well beyond that. In fact, the vision that our CSO has is of a browser that can run in an isolated sandbox and can even be disposable to not keep any information on the user.

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Why secure web-based applications with Kali Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Web

The security of web-based applications is of critical importance. The strength of an application is about more than the collection of features it provides. It includes essential (yet often overlooked) elements such as security.

Kali Linux is a trusted critical component of a security professional’s toolkit for securing web applications. The official documentation says it is “is specifically geared to meet the requirements of professional penetration testing and security auditing.“ Incidences of security breaches in web-based applications can be largely contained through the deployment of Kali Linux’s suite of up-to-date software.

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Google is bringing a Tab Strip to Chrome for Windows and Linux

Filed under
Google
Web

If you have used the Microsoft Edge web browser, classic or new, you may have stumbled upon the browser's Tab Strip feature. Just click on the arrow icon on the tab bar to display thumbnail images of the sites and resources open in the browser.

It appears that Google is attempting to bring a similar feature to the company's Chrome web browser. Already in Chrome OS, Google engineers are working on introducing Tab Strip functionality in the Chrome browser.

The feature introduces an option in the Chrome browser to display a strip of tabs. While it is unclear yet how it would be activated by the user, it is likely that Google is adding an icon to the browser's tab bar to activate and deactivate the Tab Strip view in the browser.

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Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • If you want an example of how user concerns do not drive software development, check out this Google-backed API

    A nascent web API called getInstalledRelatedApps offers a glimpse of why online privacy remains such an uncertain proposition.

    In development since 2015, Google has been experimenting with the API since the release of Chrome 59 in 2017. As its name suggests, it is designed to let web apps and sites determine whether a corresponding native app is installed on a user's device.

    The purpose of the API, as described in the proposed specification, sounds laudable. More and more, the docs state, users will have web apps and natives apps from the same source installed on the same device and as the apps' feature sets converge and overlap, it will become important to be able to distinguish between the two, so users don't receive two sets of notifications, for example.

  • Mozilla Releases DeepSpeech 0.6 With Better Performance, Leaner Speech-To-Text Engine

    DeepSpeech 0.6 currently achieved a 7.5% word error rate for this open-source speech-to-text engine. The new release has various API changes, better training performance with TensorFlow 1.14 cuDNN RNN support for their training graph, trimmed down their language model to be using the top 500k words, adding various data augmentation techniques, a tool for bulk transcribing large audio files, and various other changes.

  • [Older] Give Firefox a chance for a faster, calmer and distraction-free internet

    Using Firefox gives you peace of mind and keeps you away from the advertising companies constantly following you around, profiling you and tempting you to purchase their products.

Tails 4.1 is out

Filed under
Security
Web
Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Also: Tails 4.1 Anonymous OS Released with Latest Tor Browser, Linux Kernel 5.3.9

Mastodon announces Pixelfed, an open-source alternative to Instagram

Filed under
OSS
Web

Mastodon’s quest to federate the Internet continues with the imminent launch of a photo-sharing platform which promises to be more privacy-focussed and to give more power to netizens

Mastodon is not done making headlines. One November 26, the open-source and federated platform announced, via Twitter, that they would be launching Pixelfed, “a fediverse alternative to Instagram and other photo sharing platforms.” Tacked on the end of the tweet is the hashtag #TheFutureIsFederated.

The tweet is a quote-tweet from the Pixelfed The only form of explanation comes in a teaser video. “What is the fediverse? It’s magic. A platform for the people. And we mean everyone. We’ll be arriving soon! Power to the people. Pixelfed.org,” says the video.

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5 best lightweight browsers for Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Web

The Raspberry Pi is a lightweight computer. It is not designed for resource-heavy programs like modern web browsers. Instead, if users want to browse the internet on the Raspberry Pi, they’ll need something much more lightweight. In this list, we’ll go over some of the best lightweight browsers to use on the Raspberry Pi.

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WWW: Mozilla and the Contract for the Web, IPv6 and Terrible News for .ORG

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla and the Contract for the Web

    Mozilla supports the Contract for the Web and the vision of the world it seeks to create. We participated in helping develop the content of the principles in the Contract. The result is language very much aligned with Mozilla, and including words that in many cases echo our Manifesto. Mozilla works to build momentum behind these ideas, as well as building products and programs that help make them real.

  • Native IPv6: One Month Later

    That’s telling me I received 1.8 times as much traffic via IPv6 over the past month as I did over IPv4. Even discounting my backups (the 2 v6 peaks), which could account for up to half of that, that means IPv6 and IPv4 are about equal. That’s with all internal networks doing both and no attempt at traffic shaping between them - everything’s free to pick their preference.

    I don’t have a breakdown of what went where, but if you run a network and you’re not v6 enabled, why not? From my usage at least you’re getting towards being in the minority.

  • Why I Voted to Sell .ORG

    Hi, I'm Richard. I've been around the Internet for a while. I work for Cisco now, and used to lead security for Firefox. I've published a few RFCs and served on the Internet Engineering Steering Group (the board of the IETF). I was a co-founder of Let's Encrypt and I currently serve on its board. I care about the Internet, and I care about nonprofits.
    I'm also a member of the Board of the Internet Society, and in that role, I joined the board's unanimous decision to sell the Public Interest Registry (PIR), the registry for the .org top-level domain, to Ethos Capital. Since this transaction has gotten some attention, I'd like to speak a little about why, in my estimation, this deal is a good one for the Internet.

PHP 7.4.0 Released!

Filed under
Development
Web

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.4.0. This release marks the fourth feature update to the PHP 7 series.

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Also: PHP 7.4 Released With FFI, Typed Properties, Arrow Functions, Better Performance

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More in Tux Machines

Lakka 2.3.2 with RetroArch 1.8.4

The Lakka team wishes everyone a happy new year and welcomes 2020 with a new update and a new tier-based releases system! This new Lakka update, 2.3.2, contains RetroArch 1.8.4 (was 1.7.2), some new cores and a handful of core updates. Read more

It is time to end the DMCA anti-circumvention exemptions process and put a stop to DRM

Although it is accurate, there's one aspect of the process that is missing from that description: the length. While the process kicks off every three years, the work that goes into fighting exemptions, whether previously granted or newly requested, has a much shorter interval. As you can see from the timeline of events from the 2018 round of the exemptions process, the process stretches on for months and months. For each exemption we have to prepare research, documents, and our comments through wave after wave of submission periods. For the 2018 exemptions round, the first announcements from the United States Copyright Office were in July of 2017, on a process that concluded in October of 2018. Fifteen months, every three years. If you do the math, that means we're fighting about 40% of the time just to ensure that exemptions we already won continue, and that new exemptions will be granted. If the timeline from the last round holds up, then we're only a few short months away from starting this whole circus back up again. Describing it as a circus seems an appropriate label for the purpose of this whole process. It's not meant to be an effective mechanism for protecting the rights of users: it's a method for eating up the time and resources of those who are fighting for justice. If we don't step up, users could lose the ability to control their own computing and software. It's like pushing a rock up a mile-long hill only to have it pushed back down again when we've barely had a chance to catch our breath. Read more

Programming With Python: PyQt5, “Effective Python” and Wing Python IDE

  • PyQt5 plotting with matplotlib, embed plots in your GUI applications

    In the previous part we covered plotting in PyQt5 using PyQtGraph. That library uses the Qt vector-based QGraphicsScene to draw plots and provides a great interface for interactive and high performance plotting. However, there is another plotting library for Python which is used far more widely, and which offers a richer assortment of plots — Matplotlib. If you're migrating an existing data analysis tool to a PyQt GUI, or if you simply want to have access to the array of plot abilities that Matplotlib offers, then you'll want to know how to include Matplotlib plots within your application. In this tutorial we'll cover how to embed Matplotlib plots in your PyQt applications Many other Python libraries — such as seaborn and pandas— make use of the Matplotlib backend for plotting. These plots can be embedded in PyQt5 in the same way shown here, and the reference to the axes passed when plotting. There is a pandas example at the end of this tutorial.

  • “Effective Python” by Brett Slatkin book review

    Let’s start with the target audience for this book. I’d recommend it to the people who are using Python at least several months and are feeling good with the basics. If you need more practical advice you are definitely welcome.

  • Wing Tips: Using Black and YAPF Code Reformatting in Wing Python IDE

    ing version 7.2 has been released, so in the next couple Wing Tips we'll take a look at some of its new features. Wing 7.2 expands the options for automatic code reformatting to include also Black and YAPF, in addition to the previously supported autopep8. Using one of these allows you to develop nicely formatted uniform-looking code without spending time manually adjusting the layout of code.

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: System76 Serval WS, Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly and LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux

  • System76 Serval WS Workstation Laptop Full Review

    The System76 Serval WS laptop is crazy powerful, with a desktop CPU and a powerful Nvidia video card. In this review, I show off the hardware, weigh the pros and cons, and give my overall thoughts.

  • 2020-01-22 | Linux Headlines

    Major improvements come to Wine, Debian makes a significant change post systemd debate, and the world’s most popular open source API gateway gets an update.

  • FLOSS Weekly 563: Apprentice Program

    The Apprentice Program is an initiative to train and mentor female junior developers in open source, creating a pipeline of talent and changing the ratio in tech.

  • LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux | Install and Service Creation

    This video goes over the infamous LCARS System 47 Screensaver on Linux. You have seen it in my background and now I show how to use an old 90s screensaver scr file on Linux. I then show how to make a systemd service to activate the screensaver when you are idle for a set amount of time.