Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Web

Google Gmail accounts are bottomless barrels

Filed under
Web

PLENTY OF US use Google's Gmail accounts on a daily basis. I, for instance, obtained my first account back in early June, 2004. It only took me 10 months to fill Google's until then considered "huge" storage space. See, one gigabyte is not so much after all when you start leaving all your email on the remote server.

Back in February, I started getting nervous when the space-metre at my Gmail account hit "95%". I asked my contact at Google in the UK what would happen when the account reached 100%. Would email start bouncing back to sender? Would I be alerted and given the option to "upgrade" for a fee to a bigger storage space?

Amazon tightens rules for sellers

Filed under
Web
Fraud by third-party merchants could hurt brand integrity, some experts say

John Wocher bought the camera of his dreams from a seller on Amazon.com with nary a second thought, gleefully anticipating its arrival after wiring $4,549 to zShop merchant awesomediscount.com in January.

As February approached, Wocher stepped up the frequency of his e-mails with the seller, asking for the UPS tracking number, his concern growing after he had so amicably arranged the wire transfer from his home in Japan.

Schoolyard bullies get nastier online

Filed under
Web

When Joanne had a row with a longtime friend last year, she had no idea it would spill into cyberspace.

But what started as a spat at a teenage sleepover swiftly escalated into a three-month harangue of threatening e-mails and defacement of her Web log. "It was a nonstop nightmare," says Joanne, 14, a freshman at a private high school in Southern California. "I dreaded going on my computer."

Police smash child porn ring with raids across 12 countries

Filed under
Web
Legal

An article on theinquirer leads to a report detailing the arrest of "hundreds of people across two continents [...] in a Spanish-led operation to break a child pornography ring operating via the internet."

'Best blogs on the web' honoured

Filed under
Web

The best of the web's blogs - online diaries or websites where people publish their thoughts - have been recognised in the annual Bloggies. The winners from 30 categories were announced at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Texas, US. Boing Boing won the coveted overall best blog prize.

Internet Access Tax May Not Be Dead

Filed under
Web

Thought you were free from paying new taxes on your Internet access, at least for the next four years? The Internet Tax Non-Discrimination Act was supposed to put a moratorium on new Net taxes. That, however, hasn't stopped some in Washington from suggesting that old taxes might be applied in new ways.

New game of tagging may be "it"

Filed under
Web

One of the more tantalizing, if not confounding, innovations in how people share information on the Web has to do with a new process called tagging.

Promulgated by a site called del.icio.us, tagging has to do with on-the-fly categorization of Web links. It's like a do-it-yourself Dewey Decimal System for the Web, except that it really isn't a system at all. At least, not yet.

Google Moves Desktop Search Out of Beta

Filed under
Web

"Google Inc. is taking its desktop search application out of beta on Monday with a release that supports more file formats and opens access to third-party developers."

"Google Desktop Search 1.0 moves beyond the beta version's Microsoft focus by introducing support for applications from the Mozilla Foundation and America Online Inc.'s Netscape Communications."

Getting the net off the ground

Filed under
Web

"Early attention to security issues might have given us a better internet today - or the project might never have taken off at all, says Robert Kahn."

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

New: NuTyX 9.93 and Linux Mint 18.3

  • NuTyX 9.93 available with cards 2.3.105
    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.93 release of NuTyX. NuTyX 9.92 comes with kernel LTS 4.14.6, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2.0, binutils 2.29.1, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.5, qt 5.10.0, KDE plasma 5.11.3, KDE Framework 5.41.0, KDE Applications 17.12.0, mate 1.18.2, xfce4 4.12.4, firefox 57.0.2 Quantum, etc...
  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' Xfce and KDE editions are available for download
    Linux Mint is killing the KDE version of its operaring system -- a move some people applaud. That's what makes the new 18.3 version -- named "Sylvia" -- so frustrating. It's bizarre to release a new version of an operating system that essentially has no future. But oh well, here we are. After a short beta period, the KDE distro is now available for download -- if you still care. I recommend that KDE loyalists just switch to Kubuntu or Netrunner, but I digress. Despite being the final version of Linux Mint KDE, it is still a great alternative to the consistently disappointing Windows 10. After all, it has been discovered that Microsoft is bundling a bug-ridden password-manager with its operating system without user consent! How can you trust such an OS?! Sigh.
  • Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce Editions Officially Released, Download Now
    The Linux Mint team released the final Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Xfce and Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE editions to download, as well as an upgrade for existing Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" users. Previously in beta, the Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce editions are now officially released and ready for production use. Just like the Cinnamon and MATE flavors, they are based on Canonical's long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and use the Linux 4.10 kernel by default for new installations.

GNU: Glibc, GIMP, GCC

  • Glibc 2.27 Lands Yet More Performance Optimizations
    Earlier this month I wrote how Intel engineers have been busy with continuing to tune glibc's performance with FMA and AVX optimizations. That work has continued but also other architectures continue tuning their GNU C Library performance ahead of the expected v2.27 update. There has been a ton of optimization work this cycle, particularly on the Intel/x86_64 front. For those with newer Intel 64-bit processors, this next glibc release is shaping up to be a speedy update.
  • GIMP PIcks Up Support For The New Flatpak/FreeDesktop.org Screenshot API
    Hot off the release of the new GIMP 2.9.8 and ahead of the expected GIMP 2.10 release candidates that are expected to begin, a new addition to GIMP is a plug-in supporting the new FreeDesktop.org/Flatpak screenshot API. The org.freedesktop.portal.Screenshot specification aims to be a screenshot API that will work not only cross-desktop (e.g. KDE, GNOME, etc) but also work for sandboxed applications (i.e. Flatpak) and also work regardless of whether you are using Wayland or X11.
  • GCC Prepares For Fortran 2018 Support
    The Fortran committee decided last month to rename the upcoming Fortran 2015 programming language update to Fortran 2018. GCC support is being prepped. With this updated programming language technical specification not expected to be published until mid-2018, the committee behind this long-standing programming language decided to rename Fortran 2015 to Fortran 2018. Fortran 2018 should further improve interoperability with C code, improve its parallel programming capabilities, support hexadecimal inputs/outputs, and other improvements over Fortran 2008.

Security: Hackers, Back Doors, Microsoft Scam and Bots

  • Why Hackers Are in Such High Demand, and How They're Affecting Business Culture
    News headlines often focus on the hackers who launch cyber attacks and leak confidential data such as National Security Agency exploits, sensitive political emails, and unreleased HBO programming, but hackers can also affect organizations in positive ways. White hat hackers (as opposed to black hats) increasingly are finding employment in companies as security researchers. From conducting penetration tests and identifying vulnerabilities in software to providing companies with guidance about emerging threats, white hat hackers bring considerable value to organizations and play an instrumental role in helping them defend against today's advanced threats. White hats are highly coveted not only for their knowledge but also for their unique mindsets and ability to change corporate culture.
  • We need to talk about mathematical backdoors in encryption algorithms
    Security researchers regularly set out to find implementation problems in cryptographic algorithms, but not enough effort is going towards the search for mathematical backdoors, two cryptography professors have argued. Governments and intelligence agencies strive to control and bypass or circumvent cryptographic protection of data and communications. Backdooring encryption algorithms is considered as the best way to enforce cryptographic control. In defence of cryptography, researchers have set out to validate technology that underpins the secure exchange of information and e-commerce. Eric Filiol,  head of research at ESIEA, the operational cryptology and virology lab, argued that only implementation backdoors (at the protocol/implementation/management level) are generally considered. Not enough effort is being put into looking for mathematical backdoors or by-design backdoors, he maintains.
  • How a Dorm Room Minecraft Scam Brought Down the Internet
     

    Originally, prosecutors say, the defendants hadn’t intended to bring down the internet—they had been trying to gain an advantage in the computer game Minecraft.

  • Microsoft's Edge browser is in serious trouble
     

    Analytics firm Net Applications revised its methodology to cull bots from its browser share numbers and found that as much as half of the traffic to Edge on Windows 10 was artificially inflated.  

Mobile Linux: Tizen and Android