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Yahoo! goes Hollywood

Filed under
Movies
Web

"Watch out, Hollywood. There's a new player in town. Yahoo!, the Internet portal created a decade ago by a pair of Stanford University computer geeks, is getting serious about muscling in on the entertainment business."

Big Bullies

Filed under
Microsoft
Web

"A Dutch Web site claimed victory in a David-and-Goliath battle against Microsoft Corp. this week after the software vendor's AntiSpyware program flagged the Dutch company's home page as malicious content."

"Microsoft has agreed to compensate and apologize to the operator of Dutch directory site..."

Greetings From the Most Connected Place on Earth

Filed under
Web

Joel Strauch, of PCWorld, has written an interesting article on the proliferation of broadband connectivity in South Korea. He says, "When my wife and I arrived here last fall to teach English, we stepped into perhaps the most Internet-crazed country in the world. What tipped us off? Well, one example is that South Korea has a high school where students train in the game Starcraft like Texas high schoolers practice football."

EBay eyes open source

Filed under
OSS
Web

Following a path laid by open source developers, eBay may open up some of its source code in order to quicken the pace of application development and open up new business opportunities.

Hey Coool, a Virtual Tour

Filed under
Web

The Detroit News is carrying all the news of the entries in this year's Detroit Auto Show. In fact they even have virtual tour. Shooo, saves me a trip to Michigan! Tongue

Latest On the Browser Wars

Filed under
Web

Charles Cooper at news.com shares some of his experiences at the RSA Conference and thoughts on the IE - Firefox war. He says, "So there I was trying my best to get a midlevel Microsoft manager to take the bait. 'Does Microsoft now feel confident it's found a way to slow the rise of Firefox--maybe even win back some lost customers?' Instead I was left high and dry."

Coolest Homepage Yet!

Filed under
Web

Am I the only one who thinks this is the coolest homepage yet? Click on the software link to find that he is indeed one of us. Big Grin

Will Nutch Nudge out Google?

Filed under
Web

There's a new open source web crawler/indexer on the horizon. Will Nutch give Google a run for it's money? Time will tell I suppose, but those are pretty big shoes to fill. I'm skeptical. Read Steve Mallett's article here speculating that it is possible given enough resources.

Suicide Pact in Yahoo Chat Rooms

Filed under
Web

The San Francisco Chronicle is reporting that "an Oregon man has been arrested on suspicion of soliciting women and children on the Internet for a Valentine's Day mass suicide on the lawn of his parents' home." CNN is covering this too.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux: Rick and Morty, Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME and Linux Format on Eoan Ermine

  • We know where Rick (from Rick and Morty) stands on Intel vs AMD debate

    For one, it appears Rick is running a version of Debian with a very old Linux kernel (3.2.0) — one dating back to 2012. He badly needs to install some frickin’ updates. “Also his partitions are real weird. It’s all Microsoft based partitions,” a Redditor says. “A Linux user would never do [this] unless they were insane since NTFS/Exfat drivers on Linux are not great.”

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Every shell has a story

    … a wise someone once muttered while walking on a beach, as they picked up a shell lying on the sand. Indeed, every shell began somewhere, crossed a unique path with different goals and driven by different motivations. Some shells were created to optimize for mobility; some, for lightness; some, for speed; some were created to just fit whoever is using it and do their jobs efficiently. It’s statistically close to impossible to not find a suitable shell, one could argue. So, is this a blog about muttered shell wisdom? In some way, it actually is. It is, indeed, about Shell, and about Mutter. And even though “wisdom” is perhaps a bit of an overstatement, it is expected that whoever reads this blog doesn’t leave it less wise, so the word applies to a certain degree. Evidently, the Shell in question is composed of bits and bytes; its protection is more about the complexities of a kernel and command lines than sea predators, and the Mutter is actually more about compositing the desktop than barely audible uttering.

  • Adieu, 32

    The tenth month of the year arrives and so does a new Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) update. Is it a portent that this is the 31st release of Ubuntu and with the 32nd release next year, 32-bit x86 Ubuntu builds will end?

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Linux's Crypto API Is Adopting Some Aspects Of Zinc, Opening Door To Mainline WireGuard

    Mainlining of the WireGuard secure VPN tunnel was being held up by its use of the new "Zinc" crypto API developed in conjunction with this network tech. But with obstacles in getting Zinc merged, WireGuard was going to be resorting to targeting the existing kernel crypto interfaces. Instead, however, it turns out the upstream Linux crypto developers were interested and willing to incorporate some elements of Zinc into the existing kernel crypto implementation. Back in September is when Jason Donenfeld decided porting WireGuard to the existing Linux crypto API was the best path forward for getting this secure networking functionality into the mainline kernel in a timely manner. But since then other upstream kernel developers working on the crypto subsystem ended up with patches incorporating some elements of Zinc's design.

  • zswap: use B-tree for search
    The current zswap implementation uses red-black trees to store
    entries and to perform lookups. Although this algorithm obviously
    has complexity of O(log N) it still takes a while to complete
    lookup (or, even more for replacement) of an entry, when the amount
    of entries is huge (100K+).
    
    B-trees are known to handle such cases more efficiently (i. e. also
    with O(log N) complexity but with way lower coefficient) so trying
    zswap with B-trees was worth a shot.
    
    The implementation of B-trees that is currently present in Linux
    kernel isn't really doing things in the best possible way (i. e. it
    has recursion) but the testing I've run still shows a very
    significant performance increase.
    
    The usage pattern of B-tree here is not exactly following the
    guidelines but it is due to the fact that pgoff_t may be both 32
    and 64 bits long.
    
    
  • Zswap Could See Better Performance Thanks To A B-Tree Search Implementation

    For those using Zswap as a compressed RAM cache for swapping on Linux systems, the performance could soon see a measurable improvement. Developer Vitaly Wool has posted a patch that switches the Zswap code from using red-black trees to a B-tree for searching. Particularly for when having to search a large number of entries, the B-trees implementation should do so much more efficiently.

  • AT&T Finally Opens Up dNOS "DANOS" Network Operating System Code

    One and a half years late, the "DANOS" (known formerly as "dNOS") network operating system is now open-source under the Linux Foundation. AT&T and the Linux Foundation originally announced their plan in early 2018 wish pushing for this network operating system to be used on more mobile infrastructure. At the time they expected it to happen in H2'2018, but finally on 15 November 2019 the goal came to fruition.

Security Patches and FUD/Drama

Android Leftovers