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When Firefox Meets Chrome and Former Mozilla CEO Meets Chromium

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • How to Install Firefox in Chrome OS
  • Brave should have its own User-Agent, but here is how you detect it anyway

    The User-Agent string is the name that web browsers and other web clients send to web servers to identify their make and model to the server. This data is primarily used for statistical and troubleshooting purposes. The Brave web browser isn’t brave enough to have their own User-Agent and instead tries to camouflage as Google Chrome.

    Brave is a very opinionated web browser. This makes it easy to reliably detect it even without a unique User-Agent, and I’ll spend most of the article advocating for why Brave should have their own User-Agent. You can skip to the last two sections if you’re only interested in the detection code.

    Brave actually had a User-Agent of its own in the first few months of its existence, but removed it in April 2016. The history books (git commit logs) show that Brave removed the “Brave/Version” component from their User-Agent string to make it more difficult to fingerprint the browser.

  • How Larry Page Inspired Young Sundar Pichai Into Making Chrome A Success Story

    When Google Chrome was first launched in 2008, Firefox and Internet Explorer users had a good laugh looking at the new browser since it had no extensions, no theme support, nothing that competitors provided to users. But, slowly, people started turning to Google Chrome, and they liked it instantly. It was the fastest of all, pages loaded immediately, and people believed it could evolve into something big (the minimalist design helped there).

    Presently, Google Chrome stands at the top in browsers market with 60.98% market share against IE and Firefox who hold 12% and 11% share, respectively.

Brave Does Tor

Filed under
Security
Web
  • Brave Introduces Beta of Private Tabs with Tor for Enhanced Privacy while Browsing

    Today we’re releasing our latest desktop browser Brave 0.23 which features Private Tabs with Tor, a technology for defending against network surveillance. This new functionality, currently in beta, integrates Tor into the browser and gives users a new browsing mode that helps protect their privacy not only on device but over the network. Private Tabs with Tor help protect Brave users from ISPs (Internet Service Providers), guest Wi-Fi providers, and visited sites that may be watching their Internet connection or even tracking and collecting IP addresses, a device’s Internet identifier.

    Private Tabs with Tor are easily accessible from the File menu by clicking New Private Tab with Tor. The integration of Tor into the Brave browser makes enhanced privacy protection conveniently accessible to any Brave user directly within the browser. At any point in time, a user can have one or more regular tabs, session tabs, private tabs, and Private Tabs with Tor open.

  • Brave Browser Goes Beyond Private Browsing With Tor-powered Tabs

    The ad blocking browser Brave is presently counted as one of the top net surfing browsers of 2018, primarily for its steady privacy and secure browsing experience. It is now advancing towards perfecting private browsing

    An update (Brave 0.23) launched on Thursday for its desktop clients has integrated Private tabs with Tor to defend users from leaving digital footprints on the internet.

Web: WebAssembly, Firefox and WebCatalog

Filed under
Web
  • Remote UIs with WebGL and WebAssembly

    A frequently requested feature by Qt customers is the possibility to access, view and use a Qt-made UI remotely.

    However, in contrast to web applications, Qt applications do not offer remote access by nature as communication with the backend usually happens via direct functions call and not over socket-based protocols like HTTP or WebSockets.

    But the good thing is, with right system architecture with strong decoupling of frontend and backend and using the functionality of the Qt framework, it is possible to achieve that!

  • Level Up with New Productivity Features in Firefox for iOS

    Today, we’re announcing new features in Firefox for iOS to make your life easier. Whether you’re a multi-tasker or someone who doesn’t want to waste time, we’re rolling out new features to up your productivity game.

  • WebCatalog Allows You To Run Webapps From The Desktop In Linux

    WebCatalog is a cross-platform application designed to transfer different webapps to the desktop. The idea is not something new or has not been done before, there is Mozilla Prism to testify that it has been trying to do something like that since 2009. Now, the software we are dealing with has an updated design and an interesting catalog of applications.

curl survey 2018 analysis

Filed under
Software
Web

This year, 670 individuals spent some of their valuable time on our survey and filled in answers that help us guide what to do next. What's good, what's bad, what to remove and where to emphasize efforts more.

It's taken me a good while to write up this analysis but hopefully the results here can be used all through the year as a reminder what people actually think and how they use curl and libcurl.

Read more

Malware in Microsoft, Bugs in Android Apps

Filed under
Android
Google
Microsoft
Web

Falkon browser - Fly babe fly

Filed under
KDE
Software
Reviews
Web

Falkon and QupZilla may be the same product, but just re-branding it has already improved the overall impression. Not by a huge margin, but enough to make it interesting. Once you start using it, you do realize that it's a mix of good and odd, much like the predecessor, with some really brilliant and dubious choices packaged together. Adblocking, session manager versus fuzzy interface, missing spellcheck and database plaintext thingie. Then, the behavior is nowhere near as stellar, lithe or fast as it should be.

Still, this has been my most successful QupZilla-ed experience so far. Falkon was stable, it did not crash, there were no errors, and overall, it worked well. But the sense of unease remains. I can't put my finger to it, but there's just something slightly out of place with it. Not sure what it is. But whatever it is, it's probably the reason why there hasn't been that much uptake with this native KDE Internet-giving program. Once that part is sorted out, Plasma may have a nice and friendly browser. Worth testing, and try not to be dissuaded by the oddness.

Read more

Chromium and Firefox Web Browsers Are Now Installable as Snaps on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snappy technologies are becoming more and more popular these days as the company behind the widely used Ubuntu plans to enable them by default and even make them a first-class citizen in future releases of its Linux-based operating system.

The great thing about Snap apps is that they are secure by design, utilizing a container-style approach mechanism for deploying software on various GNU/Linux distributions that support Canonical's Snappy universal binary format.

Read more

Ghostery Liberated

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Ad-Blocker Ghostery Just Went Open Source—And Has a New Business Model

    In privacy-focused, anti-establishment corners of the internet, going open source can earn you a certain amount of street cred. It signals that you not only have nothing to hide, but also welcome the rest of the world to help make your project better. For Ghostery though, the company that makes Edward Snowden’s recommended ad blocker, publishing all its code on GitHub Thursday also means clearing up some confusion about its past.

  • Ghostery tool for web privacy goes open source

    Ghostery, a browser extension that blocks advertisers and web publishers from tracking your online behavior, has opened up its code so anyone with some programming chops can see exactly what's going on.

    Making Ghostery open-source software -- a program anyone can copy, modify and distribute -- means it's now possible for interested outsiders to get involved in its development, said Jeremy Tillman, director of product at Ghostery. And it should help clear the air lingering around Ghostery because of how its owner until last year, Evidon, did business.

Chrome 65

Filed under
Google
Web
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, US Demand for Back Doors, and Microsoft's Collusion with the NSA Keeps Serving Crackers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • State Department Still Sucks At Basic Cybersecurity And Senators Want To Know Why
    The senators are hoping the State Department will have answers to a handful of cybersecurity-related questions by October 12th, but given the agency's progress to compliance with a law that's been on the book for two years at this point, I wouldn't expect responses to be delivered in a timelier fashion. The agency's track record on security isn't great and these recent developments only further cement its reputation as a government ripe for exploitation. The agency's asset-tracking program only tracks Windows devices, its employees are routinely careless with their handling of classified info, and, lest we forget, its former boss ran her own email server, rather than use the agency's. Of course, given this long list of security failures, there's a good possibility an off-site server had more baked-in security than the agency's homebrew.
  • EternalBlue Vulnerability Puts Pirated Windows Systems at Malware Risk [Ed: Microsoft's collusion with the NSA (for US-controlled back doors) continues to cost billions... paid by people who foolishly chose or accepted PCs with Windows.]
    A particular vulnerability that has been codenamed EternalBlue is to be blamed for this misfortune. The malware risk especially affects computers which use pirated Windows versions. This gap in security has its traces back in the legacies of US secret service NSA. Even after several years, many systems continue to be vulnerable. For more than three years, US intelligence was using it for performing hidden attacks on all kinds of targets. The agency finally had to leak the vulnerability to Microsoft due to the danger of hacking by a famous hacker group, Shadow Brokers. Microsoft then consequently had to abandon a patch day for the very first time in the company’s history for filling in the gap as quickly as possible.

today's howtos

Moving Compiler Dependency Checks to Kconfig

One reason became clear recently when Linus Torvalds asked developers to add an entirely new system of dependency checks to the Kconfig language, specifically testing the capabilities of the GCC compiler. It's actually an important issue. The Linux kernel wants to support as many versions of GCC as possible—so long as doing so would not require too much insanity in the kernel code itself—but different versions of GCC support different features. The GCC developers always are tweaking and adjusting, and GCC releases also sometimes have bugs that need to be worked around. Some Linux kernel features can only be built using one version of the compiler or another. And, some features build better or faster if they can take advantage of various GCC features that exist only in certain versions. Up until this year, the kernel build system has had to check all those compiler features by hand, using many hacky methods. The art of probing a tool to find out if it supports a given feature dates back decades and is filled with insanity. Imagine giving a command that you know will fail, but giving it anyway because the specific manner of failure will tell you what you need to know for a future command to work. Now imagine hundreds of hacks like that in the Linux kernel build system. Read more

Fedora be pretty - The ultimate customization guide

I am quite pleased with the final result of this transformation. But it also requires a lot of non-standard changes, which is a shame, because none of what I did, subjective taste elements aside, is super complicated. Imagine a Fedora, or for that any which distro, that has everything really nicely tailored for max. efficiency, ergonomics, productivity, and fun. My journey encompasses the use of third-party repos, extra software, Gnome Tweak Tool, about a dozen extensions, new themes, icons, and fonts, the use of a dock, plus some extra visual polish. In the end, though, Fedora 28 looks and behaves the part. This is something I could happily show to other people, and I am convinced they would be inclined to try it. Well, there you go. The guide. Hopefully, you'll find it useful, and perhaps it may even hype up your enthusiasm for Linux. In these dreary times, an injection of fanboyese is quite needed. Take care. Read more