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Internet news and Web-based stuff

Asus C200 Chromebook review: Long battery life, moderate performance

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The Asus C200 Chromebook is a 2.5 pound laptop that offers up to 12 hours of battery life and sells for just $249. It’s not the fastest notebook around, doesn’t have the best screen, and some folks might find Google’s Chrome OS operating system limiting. But there’s a lot to like about this little laptop… especially given the low price.

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Mozilla is Working on a Firefox OS-powered Streaming Stick à la Chromecast

Filed under
Linux
Google
Moz/FF

Mozilla took the world by surprised when it announced that it was developing a Firefox operating system that would be used for mobile phones, especially in developing markets. Now, there are already a few devices out there, but it seems that this isn’t the last step for the company whose name is still associated with the famous web browsers.

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Replacing freecode: a proposal

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OSS
Web

Web frameworks have gotten much more powerful since the original Freshmeat was built 17 years ago; today, I think building a replacement wouldn’t be a huge project. It is not, however, something I am willing to try to do alone. Whether or not this goes forward will depend on how many people are willing to step up and join me. I figure we need a team of about three core co-developers, at least one of whom needs to have some prior expertise at whatever framework we end up using.

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First impressions: Canonical Orange Box and Juju (Gallery)

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

Inside the Orange Box, you'll find ten Intel micro-servers. Each is powered by Ivy Bridge i5-3427U CPUs. Every one of these mini-servers has four cores, Intel HD Graphics 4000, 16GBs of DDR3 RAM, a 128GB SSD root disk, and a Gigabit Ethernet port. The first micro-server also includes a Centrino Advanced-N 6235 Wi-Fi Adapter, and 2TB Western Digital hard drive. These are all connected in a cluster with a D-Link Gigabit switch.

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Why I Built OwnCloud and Made It Open Source

Filed under
Server
Interviews
OSS

There I was, 4 years ago (this past January) at CampKDE in San Diego, giving a talk on data privacy, warning the audience about the risks to their privacy from cloud vendors – in particular, Dropbox. So, build it yourself they said. Sure, I’ve built things in the past, so sure, I’ll do it. And there is where I started my odyssey, first, to protect myself, my friends and my colleagues from the snooping of governments, and other bad guys, and later – as I saw the worldwide interest grow – to build a real and successful project.

I had to decide a few things before I got started of course, including what it is I wanted ownCloud to do, what development platform to use, how I wanted to structure ownCloud, and of course, to name it ownCloud.

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With OnMetal, Rackspace Enters Bare-Metal OpenStack Hosting Race

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Server
OSS

OnMetal Cloud Servers are built with Open Compute Project-specified hardware and run OpenStack.

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Google investing $50 million to get girls to code

Filed under
Google
Sci/Tech
Misc

Google conducted research to determine why girls are opting out of learning how to code? As a result Google found that most girls decide before they even enter college whether they want to learn to code—so the Tech-world must win them over them at a young age. They also found that there were four major factors that determined whether girls opted into computer science: social encouragement, self-perception, academic exposure and career perception. According to recent studies less than 1 percent of high school girls express interest in majoring in computer science.

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10 Quick Facts About Docker Container Virtualization

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Server
Software

The open-source Docker virtualization technology is one of the most exciting innovations to enter the enterprise IT space in years. Docker is a container virtualization technology that offers the promise of a more efficient, lightweight approach to application deployment than most organizations are currently implementing. With a traditional virtualization hypervisor like VMware ESX, Microsoft Hyper-V or the open-source Xen and Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) technologies, each virtual machine (VM) needs its own operating system. In contrast, with Docker, applications sit inside a container that resides on a single host operating system, that can serve many containers. Although Docker is a relatively new effort that got under way in March 2013, the project has matured quickly and the Docker 1.0 milestone was released on June 9. Alongside the Docker 1.0 release came the official debut of the Docker Hub, which is a repository for what are known as "dockerized" applications that can be deployed to any Docker host. Some of the world's largest technology vendors, including IBM, Microsoft, Google, Amazon and Red Hat, support Docker. eWEEK examines the world of Docker container virtualization.

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Also: Red Hat CTO asserts OpenStack buzz is more than just hype

Facebook turns its attentions to homegrown Wedge switch and Linux OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Microsoft

SOCIAL NETWORK Facebook has introduced some of the fruits of its Open Compute project, revealing a networking switch and a supporting Linux operating system (OS).

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Red Hat results beat estimates on subscription growth

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

Red Hat Inc, the world's largest commercial distributor of the Linux operating system, reported better-than-expected adjusted profit and revenue for the first quarter, helped by growth in subscriptions.

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Which Linux Distribution Powers HP Helion Cloud? [VIDEO]

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GNU
Linux
Server
Debian

HP Helion uses its own version of Linux based on the the open-source Debian Linux operating system at its core, which is a shift away from Ubuntu Linux, the Linux distribution previous iterations of HP's cloud efforts had been using.

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Also: HP Launches Helion Managed Services

A Process for Managing and Customizing HPC Operating Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

High-performance computing (HPC) for the past ten years has been dominated by thousands of Linux servers connected by a uniform networking infrastructure. The defining theme for an HPC cluster lies in the uniformity of the cluster. This uniformity is most important at the application level: communication between all systems in the cluster must be the same, the hardware must be the same, and the operating system must be the same. Any differences in any of these features must be presented as a choice to the user. The uniformity and consistency of running software on an HPC cluster is of utmost importance and separates HPC clusters from other Linux clusters.

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Real life experiences thanks to Google Summer of Code projects

Filed under
Linux
Google

While the open source community is filled with some of the most talented minds in the world, fresh perspectives from the next generation of developers is essential to the continued pioneering spirit of open source projects. Such an injection of youthful enthusiasm lends new creative blood to the open source community, allowing projects to stay cutting edge and in keeping with current trends.

To that end, the seeds of progress are often planted in the summertime as enterprising college students participate in the annual Google Summer of Code. The global program offers student developers stipends to write code for various free, open source software projects.

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Opinion: Why CIOs should cheer Google’s latest open source move

Filed under
Google
OSS

Virtualization is changing the IT landscape, and two news items last week drove home its impact. The first was Google’s release of Kubernetes under an open-source license. Kubernetes is basically a public version of Borg, the software that the company has used internally to harness computing power from across its data centers into a massive virtual machine.

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Also: Google Open Sources PDF Software Library<

Hands-on with Canonical’s Orange Box and a peek into cloud nirvana

Filed under
Server
Hardware
Ubuntu

First off, Canonical emphasized to Ars multiple times that it is not getting into the hardware business. If you really want to buy one of these things, you can have Tranquil PC build one for you (for £7,575, or about $12,700), but Canonical won’t sell you an Orange Box for your lab—there are too many partner relationships it could jeopardize by wading into the hardware game. But what Canonical does want to do is let you fiddle with an Orange Box. It makes for an amazing demo platform—a cloud-in-a-box that Canonical can use to show off the fancy services and tools it offers.
Inside the custom orange chassis are ten stripped Intel Ivy Bridge D53427RKE NUCs. Each comes with 16GB of RAM and a 120GB SSD, and they’re all connected to a gigabit Ethernet switch. One of the NUCs is the control node; its USB and HDMI ports are wired to the Orange Box’s rear panel, and that particular node also runs Canonical’s MAAS software. Its single unified internal 320W power supply runs on a single 110v outlet—even when all ten nodes are going flat-out, it doesn't require a second power plug.

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Google Fit: Google’s new health service to challenge Apple’s HealthKit

Filed under
Android
Google
Gadgets

However, there is a need for more clarity on whether Google Fit will be integrated into the next version of Android, or offered as a standalone app that could be downloaded independently.

It added: “One source with knowledge of Google’s plans said Google Fit would allow a wearable device that measures data like steps or heart rate to interface with Google’s cloud-based services, and become part of the Google Fit ecosystem.”

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Red Hat looks to the OpenStack cloud with Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4

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Red Hat
Server

In this latest RHEV release, Red Hat states that it brings new "enhancements for traditional virtualization infrastructure, guest support for the newly released Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, as well as advanced OpenStack [cloud] support across compute, storage and networking."

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Red Hat: Governments should invest in open source cloud to keep up with technology

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Red Hat
Server
Interviews

Governments should invest in open source cloud to avoid getting trapped with a vendor and their offerings when they need to meet policy requirements or the time comes to update to new technology, Red Hat says.

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Chrome OS Features to Look for in Current Chromebook Crop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

While users were uncertain at first about the concept of using a Web-based operating system, Chrome OS morphed into something far more usable and appealing to the average computer user since it was first released in 2009. Not only are computer users more comfortable with accessing cloud applications and storing their data in the cloud, but Google has added a number of features that make it convenient to use Chrome OS productively.

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Samsung Chromebook 2 review

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Two years ago, Samsung made the first great Chromebook. It was thin, and light, and had good battery life, but most of all it was a different kind of computer. Chrome OS wasn’t like Windows, which can do absolutely everything on earth including a laundry list of things that only confuse and overwhelm most users. It was designed to be simple, functional, and focused. “It’s just a web browser” wasn’t a problem, it was progress.

As Samsung releases its successor, the Chromebook 2, things have changed. Cheap laptops can be even thinner, even faster, even more powerful, even longer-lasting; the Chromebook 2 is all four. The opportunity has grown, too: these 11.6-inch and 13.3-inch laptops enter a market in which most of what most people do all day lives inside a web browser anyway. We can do basic word processing and number-crunching with Google Docs or Office Online; we store all our files in Dropbox or OneDrive. Chrome OS feels more native than ever, but in a very real way we’ve caught up to Google’s vision more than it’s caught up to us.

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