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Measuring The Fediverse

Filed under
Web

Fediverse is what Diaspora, Mastodon, PeerTube and other federated social media altogether being called. These relatively new style of social networking is growing rapidly, as people demand more independence to their own hands, and now everyone of us can overview how large its growth or simply how big one part of it grows with nice statistics and charts. I hope this helps you to find a fediverse you want with either crowded or less crowded population. Let's see!

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Chris Lord: OffscreenCanvas update

Filed under
GNOME
Web

So, a year ago, OffscreenCanvas was starting to become usable but was missing some key features, such as asynchronous updates and text-related functions. I’m pleased to say that, at least for Linux, it’s been complete for quite a while now! It’s still going to be a while, I think, before this is a truly usable feature in every browser. Gecko support is still forthcoming, support for non-Linux WebKit is still off by default and I find it can be a little unstable in Chrome… But the potential is huge, and there are now double the number of independent, mostly-complete implementations that prove it’s a workable concept.

Something I find I’m guilty of, and I think that a lot of systems programmers tend to be guilty of, is working on a feature but not using that feature. With that in mind, I’ve been spending some time in the last couple of weeks to try and bring together demos and information on the various features that the WebKit team at Igalia has been working on. With that in mind, I’ve written a little OffscreenCanvas demo. It should work in any browser, but is a bit pointless if you don’t have OffscreenCanvas, so maybe spin up Chrome or a canary build of Epiphany.

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Hurrah, Chrome for Linux Now Supports CSD Properly

Filed under
Google
GNOME
Web

The latest development builds of Google Chrome fix several of the browser’s extant CSD issues on Linux desktops.

Those of you mouthing “What CSD related issues?!” at your screens (and thus me) probably run Google Chrome maximised on the desktop.

However, those of us who run the browser windowed have to endure (hyperbole) Chrome’s cranky client-side decoration support which draws a thick border around the entire window. This is highly noticeable in GTK themes with dark header bars, like Ubuntu’s Yaru.

Compare the current stable version of Google Chrome for Linux (v92 at the time of writing) against the current unstable build (v94) by dragging the divider in the image below (if you read from an RSS reader or a scraper site you won’t be able to do this because hey: the internet doesn’t work like that, honey).

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Best Commenting Systems for Websites That You Can Self-Host

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Web

Isso is a free and open source commenting server similar to Disqus. Users can write comments in Markdown. There is also the option to edit or delete own comments within 15 minutes.

It uses Python and SQLite in the backend and you can deploy it on any website using a single 40kb JavaScript.

Isso also allows you to import comments from Disqus and WordPress. That's an additional benefit.

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The 10 Best Websites to Run Linux in a Web Browser

Filed under
Linux
Web

Linux is not everyone’s cup of tea. But does that mean you can’t get the hang of it on your own? Definitely not. You can embark on the journey to learn Linux-based operating systems even on your Windows and Mac device.

Surprised? Well, don’t be, for the key lies in your browser. You can access Linux on your very own internet browser, right from your existing operating system.

Still can’t believe it? Why not check out these websites and test them out for yourself?

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QtWebEngine and Google's Web Monoculture

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Google
Web
  • I’ve had enough of QtWebEngine

    I’ve been using the web browser qutebrowser for several years now. It has been my favorite web browser since the very first day when tried it. I like the minimal user interface and I love that it’s 100% keyboard driven.

    Unfortunately, after more than 5 years with qutebrowser, I’m back with Firefox. I don’t know if it’s temporary or not. The reason for it is primarily due to the elephant in the room; QtWebEngine.

  • Chromium Blog: Chrome 93: Multi-Screen Window Placement, PWAs as URL Handlers, and More

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome beta channel release for Android, Android WebView, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. Learn more about the features listed here through the provided links or from the list on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 93 is beta as of July 29, 2021.

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  • Chrome 93 Beta Brings Multi-Screen Window Placement API, CSD-Like Overlay Option

    Following last week's release of Chrome 92, Google has now made available the Chrome 93 beta as the next iteration of their cross-platform web browser. 

    Arguably most interesting with Chrome 93 beta is the Multi-Screen Window Placement API. This new API makes it easier to manage several displays and can be used for use-cases like presentations where one display may be showing a slide deck while another display is showing the speaker notes, managing multiple windows for tool panes like for image and video editors, or virtual trading desks with showing multiple related windows. With Chrome 93 this new Multi-Screen window Placement API is exposed as an origin trial. 

Brave vs. Firefox: Your Ultimate Browser Choice for Private Web Experience

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Moz/FF
Web

Web browsers have evolved over the years. From downloading files to accessing a full-fledged web application, we have come a long way.

For a lot of users, the web browser is the only thing they need to get their work done these days.

Hence, choosing the right browser becomes an important task that could help improve your workflow over the years.

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Google and Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 92 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

    Chrome 92.0.4515.107 contains a number of fixes and improvements -- a list of changes is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 92.

  • Chrome 92 Released With crypto.randomUUID, Security Fixes

    Google today released Chrome 92 as their newest release on the browser's four-week release regiment.

    Chrome 92 has a number of security changes as well as some new developer additions. Among the changes with Google Chrome 92 include...

  • Mark Mayo: How we airdropped 4700 MeebitsDAO “Red Ticket” NFTs

    So what happened was that the 6th most rare Meebit was fractionalized into 1M pieces, and 30,000 (3%) of those fragments were graciously donated to MeebitsDAO by Divergence.VC. Kai proposed that a fun way to re-distribute those fractions would be to do a giveaway contest. Earn tickets for a raffle, have a shot at a chunk of a famous Meebit. Cool! There’s 3 different kinds of tickets, but for the 1st lottery Kai wanted to airdrop a raffle ticket in the form of an NFT — aka the “Red Ticket” — to every current Meebit holder so they could have a chance to win. Hype up the MeebitsDAO and have some fun!

    [...]

    If you’re new to Ethereum and NFTs, the first thing you need to do know is that you 1st deploy your smart contract to the blockchain, at which point it will get an address, and then you call that smart contract on that address to mint NFT tokens. As you mint the tokens you need to supply a URI that contains the metadata for that particular token (almost everything we think of as “the NFT” — the description, image, etc. — actually lives in the metadata file off-chain). We generate a JSON file for each ticket and upload it to IPFS via a Pinata gateway, and then pin the file with the Pinata SDK. (pinning is the mechanism where you entice IPFS nodes to not discard your files.. ah, IPFS..)

TenFourFox and Chromium Monoculture

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • TenFourFox FPR32 SPR2 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 32 Security Parity Release 2 "32.2" is available for testing (downloads, hashes). There are no changes to the release notes and nothing particularly notable about the security patches in this release. Assuming no major problems, FPR32.2 will go live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

  • How big is chromium?

    Here’s a link to a commit for dsynth that gives an idea of how huge a debug build of chromium can be.

  • 10 of the Best Chrome Themes to Beautify Your Browser

Browsers, Google Openwashing, Google-Funded Mozilla Comments on Google

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Open YouTube (And More) Videos From Your Web Browser With mpv [Firefox, Chrome]

    mpv-handler is a protocol handler for mpv written in Rust which, accompanied by a browser userscript, allows users to open videos from YouTube, Twitch and Bilibili with mpv.

    It works with both Firefox and Chromium-based web browsers on Linux and Microsoft Windows, without making use of any background service.

    With everything set up, visiting a video on one of the websites mentioned above, a new button is displayed on the video web page (in the bottom left-hand side corner), allowing you to play that video using mpv, a free and open source media player.

    From its settings, you can control the video quality and if you want to pass cookies or not, useful to watch member videos.

  • Mozilla responds to the UK CMA consultation on Google’s commitments on the Chrome Privacy Sandbox [Ed: Google-funded Mozilla as little but a corporate lobbying arm of Google]

    Regulators and technology companies together have an unique opportunity to improve the privacy properties of online advertising. Improving privacy for everyone must remain the north star of efforts surrounding privacy preserving advertising and we welcome the recent moves by the UK’s Competition Markets Authority to invite public comments on the recent voluntary commitments proposed by Google for its Chrome Privacy Sandbox initiative.

    Google’s commitments are a positive step forward and a sign of tangible progress in creating a higher baseline for privacy protections on the open web. Yet, there remain ways in which the commitments can be made even stronger to promote competition and protect user privacy. In our submission, we focus on three specific points of feedback.

  • Google Makes New Attempt At "UMCG" As Part Of Their Open-Sourcing Effort Around Fibers [Ed: Openwashing of and by monopolies]

    Since 2013 Google has been working on Fibers as a promising user-space scheduling framework. Fibers has been in use at Google and delivering great results while recently they began work on open-sourcing this framework for Linux and as part of that working on the new "UMCG" code.

    As part of their recent effort towards open-sourcing the Fibers user-space scheduling framework, they have been working on a new underlying component called UMCG, or User-Managed Concurrency Groups, for providing new primitives and the foundation for supporting Fibers.

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More in Tux Machines

Hospital to run GNU Health, openSUSE

Thousands of patients in the coastal area of Kribi, Cameroon, are set to gain enhanced health-care delivery as a hospital in the city expands with the use of energy efficient open-source solutions. The Ebomé Hospital, which is on the southern coast of central Africa, has 24-hour emergency services, an operating room, radiology, maternity, a laboratory, a pharmacy and other services. The hospital treats thousands of people every year. As the facility expands, it will use the Hospital Information System GNU Health to manage patient records, laboratory information and administrative services. The system will be running openSUSE Leap 15.3 on several Raspberry Pi 4 computers. “The excellent, long time relationship among openSUSE and GNU Health communities have resulted in a solid infrastructure that delivers state of the art technology all while delivering outstanding performance and protecting the privacy of the patients and health professionals,” said computer scientist, physician and Free Software advocate Luis Falcón. “From Single Board Computers to enterprise grade servers, to mobile phones. Our communities will continue pioneering and delivering state-of-the-art technology in the areas of public health, hospital and laboratory management, bioinformatics and personal health tech like MyGNUHealth.” Read more

Games: Total War: WARHAMMER III, Sacred Fire, Kulebra and the Souls of Limbo, Space Chef, Europa Universalis IV

Android Leftovers

5 Best Ways To Secure Your Linux System Distribution

There are many ways to secure your Linux system distribution. Today, cyber attacks and computer hacking can be prevented by bolstering security systems. By securing a Linux system, a computer is shielded from identity theft, data extraction, and other forms of malware. Different ways of securing a Linux system can teach users how to avoid spam, scams, and phishing campaigns. As a Linux developer, you should follow basic principles to increase privacy, security and stability. In this article, we’ll discuss the best ways you can secure your Linux system. Enable full disk encryption (FDE) to secure your Linux system. You should encrypt your entire hard disk regardless of which operating system you are using. This will ensure that your data remains secure if the device is stolen. First, take advantage of full disk encryption at install time if possible. By encrypting your hard disk, a criminal will be unable to extract your information without an FDE password. Encrypt your full disk so you don’t have to worry about temporary files, swap files, or other directories containing sensitive information. Furthermore, you will notice that encrypting your full disk allows your computer to function at a similar level of performance. Certainly, consider FDE as a cybersecurity tip to help Linux users protect their computers. Read more