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Action Against DRM on the Web

Filed under
Web
  • Leaders needed for International Day Against DRM (July 9, 2017)

    In the last year, we've seen cracks appearing in the foundation of the DRM status quo.

    Of course, the companies that profit from Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) are still trying to expand the system of law and technology that weakens our security and curtails our rights, in an effort to prop up their exploitative business models.

  • Tim Berners-Lee approves Web DRM, but W3C member organizations have two weeks to appeal

    Yesterday Tim Berners-Lee, the chief arbiter of Web standards, approved the controversial proposed Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) standard for the Web, Encrypted Media Extensions (EME).

  • Tim Berners-Lee Sells Out His Creation: Officially Supports DRM In HTML

    For years now, we've discussed the various problems with the push (led by the MPAA, but with some help from Netflix) to officially add DRM to the HTML 5 standard. Now, some will quibble with even that description, as supporters of this proposal insist that it's not actually adding DRM, but rather this "Encrypted Media Extensions" (EME) is merely just a system by which DRM might be implemented, but that's a bunch of semantic hogwash. EME is bringing DRM directly into HTML and killing the dream of a truly open internet. Instead, we get a functionally broken internet. Despite widespread protests and concerns about this, W3C boss (and inventor of the Web), Tim Berners-Lee, has signed off on the proposal. Of course, given the years of criticism over this, that signoff has come with a long and detailed defense of the decision... along with a tiny opening to stop it.

    There are many issues underlying this decision, but there are two key ones that we want to discuss here: whether EME is necessary at all and whether or not the W3C should have included a special protection for security researchers.

Web Browsers and Blockchain

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Mozilla Rolls Out First Firefox 54 Point Release to Fix Netflix Issue on Linux

    More than two weeks after Mozilla unveiled Firefox 54 as the first branch of the web browser to use multiple operating system processes for web page content, we now see the availability of the first point release.

    Mozilla Firefox 54.0.1 was first offered to the stable release channel users on June 29, 2017, and, according to the official release notes, it fixes a Netflix issues for users of Linux-based operating systems, addresses a PDF printing issue, and resolves multiple tab-related issues that have been reported from Firefox 54.0.

  • The Top Four Open-Source Blockchain Projects in Media

    1. Brave Web Browser

    Once upon a time, getting users to pay attention to ads on webpages was the biggest problem facing online marketers. Today, that challenge has grown even more daunting. Convincing users not to block online ads entirely has become a major task in online media.

    Brave is an open-source web browser that gives users the option to block the ads that they would normally see when they visit a website. If the user so chooses, Brave replaces those blocked ads with ones tailored to a user's preferences. The browser gives the users a slice of the advertising revenue from the tailored ads. By paying users to view ads tailored to them, Brave delivers a better user experience, while also making it easier for advertisers to reach qualified leads through online ads.

    Blockchain technology enters the picture in two ways. First, Bitcoin is used to facilitate financial transactions between Brave and its advertising partners and users. Second, Brave uses the Bitcoin ledger to store data about user browsing behavior. This eliminates the need for a centralized database where specific users' behavior would be linked to their names. Instead, browsing behavior remains anonymous and essentially un-hackable.

  • Blockstack: An Open Source Browser Powered By Blockchain For Creating A New Internet

    Blockstack, a blockchain startup, has released a decentralized browser to make an internet that would be free from dependence on large organizations and key players. The makers of Blockstack browser have called it the Netscape of the decentralized internet for running and making apps. A developer release of Blockstack browser is available, and a user version will arrive in six months.

  • Colu Launches Bankbox, an Open-Source Protocol to Help Banks Issue Digital Currencies
  • BloqLabs from Bloq goes live to connect enterprises with open source blockchain projects
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  • Bloq Launches BloqLabs to Bring Open Source Blockchain Technologies to Enterprise

    Bloq, a leader in the development of enterprise-grade Blockchain solutions, has launched BloqLabs to expand its ongoing sponsorship and support of critical open source projects in the bitcoin and Blockchain ecosystems.

  • [Older] Blockchain pioneers back open source code, Greenwich Associates

    81% view permissioned blockchains as inherently more secure than public blockchains. “In the end, a blockchain-enabled financial market will likely consist of a core plumbing of market infrastructure developed by the open source community, operating beneath proprietary applications that provide a higher level of security,” says Johnson.

Chromium, Chrome, and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Chromium Mus/Ozone update (H1/2017): wayland, x11

    Since January, Igalia has been working on a project whose goal is to make the latest Chromium Browser able to run natively on Wayland-based environments. The project has various phases, requires us to carve out existing implementations and align our work with the direction Chromium’s mainline is taking.

    In this post I will provide an update on the progresses we have made over 2017/H1, as well as our plans coming next.

    In order to jump straight to the latest results section (including videos) without the details, click here.

  • Browse Against the Machine

    I head up Firefox marketing, but I use Chrome every day. Works fine. Easy to use. Like most of us who spend too much time in front of a laptop, I have two browsers open; Firefox for work, Chrome for play, customized settings for each. There are multiple things that bug me about the Chrome product, for sure, but I‘m OK with Chrome. I just don’t like only being on Chrome.

  • Firefox hogs less memory and gets a speed bump in its latest update

    In an attempt to even the playing field with competitors, Mozilla Firefox stepped up its game Tuesday by releasing an update that will increase browser speeds and cut down on memory usage.

    Firefox 54 has opened up its upper limit of processes from one to four, although users can customize it to be more by entering “about:config” in the address bar and adjusting the settings themselves.

    This new version of Firefox feels faster and it scores higher on an online browser speed test than Chrome or Safari, even after opening 20 tabs, although it still gives the old loading sign on all of the pages. Firefox product vice president Nick Nguyen calls this upgrade “the largest change to Firefox code in our history,” according to his blog post detailing the changes.

  • [Older] Firefox memory usage with multiple content processes

    My previous measurements found that four content processes are a sweet spot for both memory usage and performance. As a follow up we wanted to run the tests again to confirm my conclusions and make sure that we’re testing on what we plan to release. Additionally I was able to work around our issues testing Microsoft Edge and have included both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Firefox on Windows; 32-bit is currently our default, 64-bit is a few releases out.

    The methodology for the test is the same as previous runs, I used the atsy project to load 30 pages and measure memory usage of the various processes that each browser spawns during that time.

Chrome 60 Beta, New Firefox, Thunderbird Themes

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome 60 Beta Rolls Out With VP9 Improvements, New Developer Features

    Chrome 60 Beta adds a Paint Timing API to provide more insight to developers about their "first paint" performance, CSS font-display support, improvements to the Credential Management API, the Payment Request API has been added to desktop Chrome, there's a new Web Budget API to allow sites using push notifications to send a limited number of push messages that will trigger background work, support for Web Push Encryption was added, and a range of other CSS/JavaScript features and APIs.

  • The Best Firefox Ever

    On the Firefox team, one thing we always hear from our users is that they rely on the web for complex tasks like trip planning and shopping comparisons. That often means having many tabs open. And the sites and web apps running in those tabs often have lots of things going on– animations, videos, big pictures and more. Complex sites are more and more common. The average website today is nearly 2.5 megabytes – the same size as the original version of the game Doom, according to Wired. Up until now, a complex site in one Firefox tab could slow down all the others. That often meant a less than perfect browsing experience.

  • Thunderbird Arc Theme Updated With Support for Arc Variants

    An update to the Arc Thunderbird theme add-on is now available for download, and brings support for the 3 Arc GTK theme variants.

WordPress 4.8 Overview and Working From Home

Filed under
OSS
Web

Browsers: Chrome 61, Mozilla Against Software Patents, Firefox Photon, and Tor 7.0

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

How open source is advancing the Semantic Web

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Semantic Web, a term coined by World Wide Web (WWW) inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, refers to the concept that all the information in all the websites on the internet should be able to interoperate and communicate. That vision, of a web of knowledge that supplies information to anyone who wants it, is continuing to emerge and grow.

In the first generation of the WWW, Web 1.0, most people were consumers of content, and if you had a web presence it was comprised of a series of static pages conveyed in HTML. Websites had guest books and HTML forms, powered by Perl and other server-side scripting languages, that people could fill out. While HTML provides structure and syntax to the web, it doesn't provide meaning; therefore Web 1.0 couldn't inject meaning into the vast resources of the WWW.

Read more

Chrome 59 and Chromium

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web

Broswers: Chrome, Servo, and Firefox

Filed under
Web
  • Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

    Publishers will get a six-month headsup before Google kills intrusive advertising on Chrome, sources close to the ad giant have reportedly said.

    Google will also hand online publishers a special tool to make sure that their ads are "compliant", the WSJ was told, called "Ad Experience Reports" – ostensibly to be based on the recommendations of industry group the Coalition for Better Ads, of which Facebook and Google are members.

  • flatpak-ing Servo Nightly

    Servo - that rendering engine written in Rust - can be built from source. But there are also nightly builds available.

  • Mozilla Brings Virtual Reality to all Firefox Users

    We are delighted to announce that WebVR will ship on by default for all Windows users with an HTC VIVE or Oculus Rift headset in Firefox 55 (currently scheduled for August 8th). WebVR transforms Virtual Reality (VR) into a first-class experience on the web, giving it the infinite possibilities found in the openness and interoperability of the Web Platform. When coupled with WebGL to render 3D graphics, these APIs transform the browser into a platform that allows VR content to be published to the Web and instantaneously consumed from any capable VR device.

Web Browsers: WebAssembly and Mozilla's Open-Source Hackathon

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

  • Goodbye PNaCl, Hello WebAssembly!

    Historically, running native code on the web required a browser plugin. In 2013, we introduced the PNaCl sandbox to provide a means of building safe, portable, high-performance apps without plugins. Although this worked well in Chrome, it did not provide a solution that worked seamlessly across all browsers.

  • Google Plans End To PNaCl Support In Favor Of WebAssembly

    The Portable Native Client (PNaCl) ecosystem hasn't been too vibrant for executing native code in web-browsers given its lack of adoption outside of Google/Chrome and other factors. With WebAssembly seeing much broader adoption and inroads, Google is planning to end PNaCl.

  • Mozilla’s Giant, Distributed, Open-Source Hackathon

    Mozilla’s annual Global Sprint is scheduled for June 1 and 2. It’s an international public event: an opportunity for anyone, anywhere to energize their open-source projects with fresh insight and input from around the world.

    Participants include biostatisticians from Brazil, research scientists from Canada, engineers from Nepal, gamers from the U.S., and fellows from Princeton University. In years past, hundreds of individuals in more than 35 cities have participated in the Global Sprint.

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More in Tux Machines

Making GNOME Look Like Apple's Operating System

  • A macOS Mojave Inspired GTK Theme Appears
    A new GTK theme brings the luscious look of macOS Mojave to the Linux desktop. Not that you should be surprised; we’ve written before about how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac. But thanks to this new macOS Mojave inspired GTK theme that fact is truer, and more faithful, than ever.
  • Make Ubuntu Look Like macOS Mojave’s Dark Mode
    If you’re a Linux user who likes the look of the dark mode coming in macOS Mojave, you’re in luck: there’s a GTK theme just for you. The theme is available on Gnome-Look.org alongside several other macOS inspired themes. You’re looking for the one titled McOS-MJV-Dark-mode, but feel free to download more if you think you might want to switch it up later. Installing is a little tricky: you need to create a .themes directory in your home folder, then extract the folder in the downloaded archive into that folder. Next you need to install Gnome Tweaks in the Ubuntu Software Store, which you can use to change the theme. You can also use Gnome Tweaks to move the buttons to the left side of the window, where they belong. Fight me.

Android Leftovers

Servers With GNU/Linux

  • Linux Foundation Shifts Network Infrastructure to Kubernetes
    The Linux Networking Fund (LNF) is making significant progress toward embracing Kubernetes as a platform for delivering a range of networking services that are expected to be widely embraced by telecommunications carriers and cloud service providers (CSP). Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking an orchestration for The Linux Foundation, says the latest Beijing release of the Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP) contains several modules that have been ported to Kubernetes, with more to follow once the Casablanca release of ONAP is released.
  • A Platform Of A Certain Age And Respectability
    But seriously. The many rivals of the OS/400 platform and its follow-ons since that June 21, 1988, launch of the Application System/400 are now gone or not even on life support. We can all rattle them off, but the important ones that drove innovation for OS/400 and its children through to the current IBM i are DEC’s VMS for the VAX and Alpha systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s MPE for the HP 3000 and HP-UX for the HP 9000s, and Sun Microsystems’ Solaris for the Sparc systems. You could throw in SCO Unix, Novell NetWare, and a slew of proprietary operating systems in Europe and Japan, and while you are at it, you should probably also include the IBM System/38’s CPF operating system and the IBM System/36’s SSP operating system. Even OS/2 and its PS/2 platform actually predate the AS/400 by 10 months – and they are long, long gone.
  • Uptycs Raises $13M, Launches Osquery-Based Security Platform
    No. 2 is the growing popularity of Mac and Linux-based infrastructure. Traditional enterprise workloads are deployed on Windows, so that’s where malicious activity historically occurred. But now more companies are using Mac infrastructure and transitioning new workloads to Linux in the cloud. Companies need to monitor and secure these environments as well, and Uptycs’ security platform covers all of the above.
  • CeBIT 2018: Huawei to roll-out KunLun V5 server
    Huawei is set to launch the latest server in its KunLun mission critical range with the V5, teaming up once more with Suse, further confirming that the company’s Linux Enterprise Server system is its preferred standard for the range.
  • Why an Infrastructure Transition is the Perfect Time to Invest in Security
    The idea behind containers has been around since the 1970s, when the technology was first used to isolate application code on Unix systems. However, the use of containers only became widespread in 2013 with the advent of Docker, and container orchestration tools like Kubernetes are even newer than that.

A look at Lutris – Open Gaming Platform for GNU/Linux

Lutris is quite the handy application I’ve discovered, that helps with organization and installation of games on GNU/Linux, even if they come from multiple sources. One of the project's goals is to support any game that runs on Linux regardless of whether it runs natively, through Wine, or other means. The main appeal of Lutris is that it provides an interface to manage all games installed on the machine regardless of source. While it is necessary to integrate the games in the application first, doing so is not super complicated. You may add local games right away by selecting them from the local system or visit the Lutris website to add games this way. Lutris simplifies nearly everything. Users can visit the list of support games on the Lutris website, choose to download and install the game (Note: If its a game that must be bought, you must own it first.) The website lists supported games and where you can acquire or download them. You can use filters on the site to display only free games, games of a genre, or use the built-in search to find games of interest quickly using it. Read more