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A Collection Of The Ultimate Web Browsers For Ubuntu

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Web
Ubuntu

Web browsers are vital if you're going to have any sort of online experience on your computer. There are hundreds of choices out there, as well as the standard browser which will come pre-installed on your computer, but that's often not the best choice, and it can be quite an intimidating task to sift through every dodgy review site on the internet to try and find the right browser for you. Ending up with a Downloads folder filled with installers and a desktop littered with icons isn't what you want or need, so this collection of web browsers for Ubuntu should be able to help you decide on which one you want before you go and download every single browser available on the internet.

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Top 4 Best Blogging Software for Linux in 2019

Filed under
Software
Web

In the last few years, blogging has become a popular way of sharing one’s thoughts about almost anything. While people use blogs to express themselves, businesses go with blogging to cement their position as a competent authority in their area of operations. Over the past years, many have taken on blogging as various blogging software makes it as simple and straightforward as possible. Now, you can create a blog site even if you lack technical skills such as coding and web development.

Today, blogging software is being created for every operating system, not just for Windows and Mac. Since bloggers who want to make themselves heard are using different operating systems, it is essential to help you identify the best blogging software for Linux as well. Here are the top four blogging software for Linux.

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Also: RV Offsite Backup Update

Daniel Stenberg: more tiny curl

Filed under
Software
Web

Without much fanfare or fireworks we put together and shipped a fresh new version of tiny-curl. We call it version 0.10 and it is based on the 7.65.3 curl tree.

tiny-curl is a patch set to build curl as tiny as possible while still being able to perform HTTPS GET requests and maintaining the libcurl API. Additionally, tiny-curl is ported to FreeRTOS.

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Daniel Stenberg: First HTTP/3 with curl

Filed under
Software
Web

In the afternoon of August 5 2019, I successfully made curl request a document over HTTP/3, retrieve it and then exit cleanly again.

(It got a 404 response code, two HTTP headers and 10 bytes of content so the actual response was certainly less thrilling to me than the fact that it actually delivered that response over HTTP version 3 over QUIC.)

The components necessary for this to work, if you want to play along at home, are reasonably up-to-date git clones of curl itself and the HTTP/3 library called quiche (and of course quiche’s dependencies too, like boringssl), then apply pull-request 4193 (build everything accordingly) and run a command line like:

curl --http3-direct https://quic.tech:8443

The host name used here (“quic.tech”) is a server run by friends at Cloudflare and it is there for testing and interop purposes and at the time of this test it ran QUIC draft-22 and HTTP/3.

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Chrome 76

Filed under
Google
Software
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 76 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.
    Chrome 76.0.3809.87 contains a number of fixes and improvements -- a list of changes is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 76.

  • Chrome 76 Released With Flash Blocked By Default

    Google today promoted their Chrome 76 web-browser to stable for all supported platforms, including Linux.

    The Chrome 76 release isn't the most exciting update in recent times, but is notable for now no longer auto-loading Flash content when Flash is active/available to the browser. It's another step towards eliminating Flash on the web.

  • Chrome 76 arrives with Flash blocked by default, detecting Incognito mode disabled, and PWA improvements

    Google today launched Chrome 76 for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS. The release includes Adobe Flash blocked by default, Incognito mode detection disabled, multiple PWA improvements, and more developer features. You can update to the latest version now using Chrome’s built-in updater or download it directly from google.com/chrome.

5 open-source Firefox alternatives for Linux users

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Mozilla Firefox is an excellent open-source web browser, perhaps one of the best tools on the entire Linux platform. Still, the Firefox browser is adding more and more features, and these new additions aren’t for everyone. If you’re looking for an open-source alternative to Firefox on Linux, we’ve got you covered. Here are 5 open-source Firefox alternatives for Linux users.

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PHP 7.4 Beta

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Web

GNUnet 0.11.6 released

Filed under
GNU
Web

This is a bugfix release for 0.11.5, fixing a lot of minor bugs, improving stability and code quality. Further, our videos are back on the homepage. In this release, we again improved the webpage in general and updated our documentation. As always: In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny (about 200 peers) and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.11.6 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance.

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Google, Money and Censorship in Free Software communities

Filed under
Google
Web
Debian

Alexander Wirt (formorer) has tried to justify censoring the mailing list in various ways. Wirt is also one of Debian's GSoC administrators and mentors, it appears he has a massive conflict of interest when censoring posts about Google.

Wirt has also made public threats to censor other discussions, for example, the DebConf Israel debate. The challenges of holding a successful event in that particular region require a far more mature approach.

Why are these donations and conflicts of interest hidden from the free software community who rely on, interact with contribute to Debian in so many ways? Why doesn't Debian provide a level playing field, why does money from Google get this veil of secrecy?

[...]

Google also operates a mailing list for mentors in Google Summer of Code. It looks a lot like any other free software community mailing list except for one thing: censorship.

Look through the "Received" headers of messages on the mailing list and you can find examples of messages that were delayed for some hours waiting for approval. It is not clear how many messages were silently censored, never appearing at all.

Recent attempts to discuss the issue on Google's own mailing list produced an unsurprising result: more censorship.

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6 open source web browser alternatives

Filed under
OSS
Web

Open source web browsers have come a long way since Microsoft dominated the web browser market with its closed source Internet Explorer (IE). For many years, IE was the standard browser for Microsoft's Windows operating system, while Safari (also closed source) was the default browser for MacOS. Then Mozilla's introduction of Firefox, followed by Google's release of Chrome, sparked a revolution in open source internet browsers. Those two are extremely well known but are not the only open source browsers available.

This article introduces seven open source browsers, summarizes their features, and shares how you can contribute to them.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux on the MAG1 8.9 inch mini-laptop (Ubuntu and Fedora)

The Magic Ben MAG1 mini-laptop is a 1.5 pound notebook computer that measures about 8.2″ x 5.8″ x 0.7″ and which features an 8.9 inch touchscreen display and an Intel Core m3-8100Y processor. As I noted in my MAG1 review, the little computer also has one of the best keyboards I’ve used on a laptop this small and a tiny, but responsive trackpad below the backlit keyboard. Available from GeekBuying for $630 and up, the MAG1 ships with Windows 10, but it’s also one of the most Linux-friendly mini-laptops I’ve tested to date. [...] I did not install either operating system to local storage, so I cannot comment on sleep, battery life, fingerprint authentication, or other features that you’d only be able to truly test by fully installing Ubuntu, Fedora, or another GNU/Linux-based operating system. But running from a liveUSB is a good way to kick the tires and see if there are any obvious pain points before installing an operating system, and for the most part the two operating systems I tested look good to go. Booting from a flash drive is also pretty easy. Once you’ve prepared a bootable drive using Rufus, UNetbootin, or a similar tool, just plug it into the computer’s USB port, hit the Esc key during startup to bring up the UEFI/SETUP utility. Read more Also: Top 10 technical skills that will get you hired in 2020

Android Leftovers

An Extensive Look At The AMD Naples vs. Rome Power Efficiency / Performance-Per-Watt

Since the AMD EPYC 7002 "Rome" series launch in August we have continue to be captivated by the raw performance of AMD's Zen 2 server processors across many different workloads as covered now in countless articles. The performance-per-dollar / TCO is also extremely competitive against Intel's Xeon Scalable line-up, but how is the power efficiency of these 7nm EPYC processors? We waited to deliver those numbers until having a retail Rome board for carrying out those tests and now after that and then several weeks of benchmarking, here is an extensive exploration of the AMD EPYC 7002 series power efficiency as well as a look at the peak clock frequencies being achieved in various workloads to also provide some performance-per-clock metrics compared to Naples. Read more

Firefox Picture in Picture is Sweet, Here’s How to Use it on Linux

Picture in picture (PIP) is a novel feature that makes it a doddle to watch a video while you’re busy doing something else (like reading blog posts). How? It allows video content to “pop out” of a web page and play in a separate floating window (with mouse-over player controls, where possible). With PIP you no longer need to tear out a browser tab, resize it narrowly, and try and fit it in somewhere on your screen. And Firefox 72, which is currently in beta, supports this handy feature on the Linux desktop. Read more