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CMS-Centric FOSS Funding

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • London-based New Vector nabs €4.1 million for ‘Matrix’, its decentralised comms ecosystem

    Today New Vector, who is behind new collaboration solutions used by European governments and organisations alike, has announced raising approximately €4.1 million from Automattic Inc. This new investor brings both the financial backing and experience of being the parent company of web publishing and e-commerce platforms WordPress.com, WooCommerce, Jetpack, and enterprise WordPress VIP.

    New Vector, founded in 2017, is on a mission to enable governments, businesses and individuals to run their own secure communication infrastructure, while interconnecting via the global Matrix network. So far the startup has developed Riot, the flagship Matrix-based messaging app, and Modular, the leading Matrix-based hosting platform. New Vector, formed by the team who created Matrix, also provides significant development to the Matrix open source project (an open network for secure, decentralised communication which lets organisations and individuals run their own collaboration apps).

  • Automattic pumps $4.6M into New Vector to help grow Matrix, an open, decentralized comms ecosystem
  • Headless CMS company Strapi raises another $10 million
  • Open-Source 'Headless' CMS Company Strapi Raises $10 Million

    Strapi — the open-source “headless” content management system (CMS) — announced it raised $10 million in Series A funding led by Index Ventures. Including this round of funding, the company has raised a total of $14 million.

    Previously, Strapi raised $4 million in seed funding in October 2019 with Accel and Stride.VC. And the company also hired former Docker head of community Victor Coisne as VP of marketing and the company also announced plans to open its first U.S. office in San Francisco.

Vivaldi Web Browser Gives Users More Privacy Options with Startpage

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Web

In an attempt to put user privacy first, the Vivaldi web browser now features Startpage as a search engine option. Users will be able to enable Startpage with a few mouse clicks if they care about their privacy when surfing the Internet.

With the latest release, Vivaldi already adopted more privacy-oriented features for its power users with new build-in tracker and ad blockers. Now, Vivaldi wants to offer users private search results without third-party tracking.

Read more

Best Linux Text-Based Browsers

Filed under
Linux
Web

In the past, the Internet was mostly made up of simple pages and text. These pages could be accessed by low powered computers that used slow dial up connections. People used text-based browsers to visit sites and surf the Internet. Over time, things have progressed greatly and now, the world of Internet has become fully graphical.Powerful browsers such as Chrome and Firefox have introduced and a huge transition in the world of browsing. Even so, text-based web browsers are still alive and kicking; specifically, in Linux. Users of Linux consider themselves to be Command Line experts, and often prefer to do their work through the help of the terminal, rather than using the GUI.

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Internet: IndieWeb, Tor, DMARC and Moodle

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Web
  • This Week in the IndieWeb celebrates six years of weekly newsletters!

    First published on 2014-05-12, the newsletter started as a fully-automatically generated weekly summary of activity on the IndieWeb’s community wiki: a list of edited and new pages, followed by the full content of the new pages, and then the recent edit histories of pages changed that week.

    Since then the Newsletter has grown to include photos from recent events, the list of upcoming events, recent posts about the IndieWeb syndicated to the IndieNews aggregator, new community members (and their User pages), and a greatly simplified design of new & changed pages.

  • New Release: Tor 0.4.3.5

    Tor 0.4.3.5 is the first stable release in the 0.4.3.x series. This series adds support for building without relay code enabled, and implements functionality needed for OnionBalance with v3 onion services. It includes significant refactoring of our configuration and controller functionality, and fixes numerous smaller bugs and performance issues.

  • Nearly 1 Million Domains Use DMARC, but Only 13% Prevent Email Spoofing

    Valimail says a total of 933,000 domains had published DMARC records in January 2020, up from 784,000 domains in July 2019. The adoption of DMARC increased by 70% compared to the previous year and by 180% compared to two years ago.

    However, only 13% of the 933,000 domains are configured with the quarantine or reject enforcement policies.

    “Worse, that percentage has generally declined over time, although it has remained level in the past twelve months. The inescapable conclusion: interest in DMARC is growing, but DMARC expertise is not keeping pace,” Valimail wrote in its report.

  • The Certified Moodle Partner Network: a pledge of guarantee

    Moodle is the world’s most popular learning management system (LMS), used by countless schools, universities, not-for-profit organisations and companies to respond to their education and training needs. To date, Moodle is being used by almost 200 million learners worldwide Many of these users are supported by our Certified Moodle Partner Network.

Mozilla and the Internet

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • [Mozilla's Eric Rescorla] What the heck happened with .org?

    If you are following the tech news, you might have seen the announcement that ICANN withheld consent for the change of control of the Public Interest Registry and that this had some implications for .org. However, unless you follow a lot of DNS inside baseball, it might not be that clear what all this means. This post is intended to give a high level overview of the background here and what happened with .org. In addition, Mozilla has been actively engaged in the public discussion on this topic; see here for a good starting point.

    [...]

    During this period the actual name registrations were handled by a series of government contractors (first SRI and then Network Solutions) but the creation and assignment of the top-level domains was under the control of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), which in practice, mostly meant the decisions of its Director, Jon Postel. However, as the Internet became bigger, this became increasingly untenable especially as IANA was run under a contract to the US government. Through a long and somewhat complicated series of events, in 1998 this responsibility was handed off to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which administers the overall system, including setting the overall rules and determining which gTLDs will exist (which ccTLDs exist is determined by ISO 3166-1 country codes, as described in RFC 1591). ICANN has created a pile of new gTLDs, such as .dev, .biz, and .wtf (you may be wondering whether the world really needed .wtf, but there it is). As an aside, many of the newer names you see registered are not actually under gTLDs, but rather ccTLDs that happen to correspond to countries lucky enough to have cool sounding country codes. For instance, .io is actually the British Indian Ocean’s TLD and .tv belongs to Tuvalu.

    One of the other things that ICANN does is determine who gets to run each TLD. The way this all works is that ICANN determines who gets to be the registry, i.e., who keeps the records of who has which name as well as some of the technical data needed to actually route name lookups. The actual work of registering domain names is done by a registrar, who engages with the customer. Importantly, while registrars compete for business at some level (i.e., multiple people can sell you a domain in .com), there is only one registry for a given TLD and so they don’t have any price competition within that TLD; if you want a .com domain, VeriSign gets to set the price floor. Moreover, ICANN doesn’t really try to keep prices down; in fact, they recently removed the cap on the price of .org domains (bringing it in line with most other TLDs). One interesting fact about these contracts is that they are effectively perpetual: the contracts themselves are for quite long terms and registry agreements typically provide for automatic renewal except under cases of significant misbehavior by the registry. In other words, this is a more or less permanent claim on the revenues for a given TLD.

  • Heads-Up to RSS Reader Authors

    NetNewsWire 5.0.1 for iOS is delayed due to an apparently new, or newly-enforced, issue: if an RSS reader includes default feeds, Apple will ask for documentation that says you have permission to include those default feeds.

  • Why Forking HTML Into A Static Language Doesn't Make Sense

    A bigger issue is that defining a static fork of HTML is easy, but persuading Web developers to use it is where the real problem lies, and that is immensely difficult and no-one has any good ideas for how to do it. Of course, if you do find a way to persuade Web developers to avoid features you don't like, there isn't much value in defining a specific "static subset" of HTML.

Free Software on the Web: Mozilla, Drupal, TYPO3 and More

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Web
  • SpiderMonkey Newsletter 4 (Firefox 76-77)

    SpiderMonkey is the JavaScript engine used in Mozilla Firefox. This newsletter gives an overview of the JavaScript and WebAssembly work we’ve done as part of the Firefox 76 and 77 Nightly cycles.

  • William Lachance: A principled reorganization of docs.telemetry.mozilla.org

    I’ve been thinking a bunch over the past few months about the Mozilla data organization’s documentation story. We have a first class data platform here at Mozilla, but using it to answer questions, especially for newer employees, can be quite intimidating. As we continue our collective journey to becoming a modern data-driven organization, part of the formula for unlocking this promise is making the tools and platforms we create accessible to a broad internal audience.

    My data peers are a friendly group of people and we have historically been good at answering questions on forums like the #fx-metrics slack channel: we’ll keep doing this. That said, our time is limited: we need a common resource for helping bring people up to speed on how to use the data platform to answer common questions.

    Our documentation site, docs.telemetry.mozilla.org, was meant to be this resource: however in the last couple of years an understanding of its purpose has been (at least partially) lost and it has become somewhat overgrown with content that isn’t very relevant to those it’s intended to help.

  • Contegix Welcomes Jon Pugh as Director of Product, Open Source for BlackMesh Drupal Offerings

    Contegix is committed to supporting the Drupal and Open Source DevOps communities, and is demonstrating that commitment by investing in the OpenDevShop platform. Contegix will continue to offer its BlackMesh Drupal support services to organizations with highly complex and secure deployments.

    “One of the many reasons I joined Contegix was their clear intent to support the Open Source DevOps community,” said Pugh. “That commitment is crucial for the DevShop ecosystem to thrive. Open Source is a requirement if you want to host on your own servers or use it locally.”

  • TYPO3 Updates, Magnolia Partners With BigCommerce, More Open Source News

    The TYPO3 community announced the availability of TYPO3 v10.4, also known as TYPO3 v10 LTS. The community believes this version is the most stable to date, featuring modern PHP libraries and many new enterprise features. Here’s an overview of some of the updates for key stakeholders.

  • In pursuit of open science, open access is not enough

    The struggle for control over information and knowledge looms large. When Berners-Lee created the World Wide Web, his intention was to enable researchers to share their work. Not only have our research communication tools and practices thus far fallen short of the decentralization that the Web made possible, but the evolution of the Web itself also reminds us that making vast amounts of linked data readily accessible to third parties can trigger a number of unintended consequences. The dominance of a limited number of social networks, shopping services, and search engines shows us how [Internet] platforms based on data and analytics can tend toward monopoly. In the research information space, contracts are being negotiated establishing de facto terms and conditions for how data analytics services are being provided. Learned societies are being wooed. Research assessment metrics are being proposed. Building blocks for establishing discipline portals are being assembled. The time for the academic community to act in coordination is now.

  • Minimalist HTML

    This article is about HTML5.

    Note: Some of these *might* break spec, but are so commonplace that they might as well be in here. For example, <title> is required by the HTML spec, but 99% of all browsers will make up something for you if it isn't supplied.

    Note: I wouldn't use this advicefEnergy on production websites. But for quick development, here are some tips that help me.

  • The Library of Congress is launching an open-source archive of hip-hop samples dating back more than a century

    Citizen DJ is the brainchild of Brian Foo, a 2020 Innovator-in-Residence Program at the U.S. Library of Congress. The goal of the project is simple: to provide free audio and video samples to encourage creativity through remixing.

WWW/Internet: Curl, Mozilla and WordPress

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Web
  • Daniel Stenberg: qlog with curl

    I want curl to be on the very bleeding edge of protocol development to aid the Internet protocol development community to test out protocols early and to work out kinks in the protocols and server implementations using curl’s vast set of tools and switches.

    For this, curl supported HTTP/2 really early on and helped shaping the protocol and testing out servers.

    For this reason, curl supports HTTP/3 already August 2019. A convenient and well-known client that you can then use to poke on your brand new HTTP/3 servers too and we can work on getting all the rough edges smoothed out before the protocol is reaching its final state.

  • Mozilla starts funding open source coronavirus tech projects

    Mozilla has revealed the first set of open source projects that will receive funding for developing innovative technology for use during the coronavirus pandemic.

    On Wednesday, the non-profit said that three recipients, so far, have been selected from over 160 applicants from 30 countries.

    The COVID-19 Solutions Fund Awards were opened less than two weeks ago. The scheme, launched under the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) awards program, offers applicants up to $50,000 each to develop open source technology that tackles issues caused by COVID-19.

  • March Madness 2020 is cancelled (in May)

    Welcome to May 2020, where everything is terrible.

    Let's take a look at a bug reported against a site rendered irrelevant by the world we find ourselves currently living in, one where March Madness 2020 was cancelled.

    That site is bracketchallenge.ncaa.com, which I've never used, but I gather is fun cross between Pogs and college basketball. But sponsored by a Fortune 500 American bank.

    [...]

    So what are the "security flaws that allow for exploits of authentication" in non-Chrome Mobile browsers? The first rule of playing basketball pogs, it turns out, is to just fabricate nonsense. Actually, I can see why children and adults (and banks!) love March Madness so much.

  • The Future of WordPress: The Block Editor Is Here to Stay

    Soviet-style mind manipulation and propaganda for certain unnamed companies.

    It is not all negative. Far more comments are from people who are ecstatic about the current editor and the upcoming features that will expand the block system to other areas of WordPress.

    However, I felt the need to address a recent request that we stop covering the block editor. While I cannot speak for our entire staff, there are two simple truths about why I write about blocks.

Browse the Peer-to-peer Web With Beaker Browser

Filed under
Software
Web

The Internet as we know it has existed unchanged (more or less) for the last 50 years. People across the globe use their devices to retrieve data from huge servers dotted around the world.

A group of dedicated technologists wants to change that to make the internet a place where people can connect and share information directly instead of relying on a central server (decentralization).

There are a bunch of such decentralized services that we have already covered on It’s FOSS. LBRY as YouTube alternative, Mastodon as Twitter alternative are just a couple of such examples.

And today I am going to cover another such product called Beaker Browser which is essentially for browsing the peer to peer web.

Read more

Better than Zoom: Try these free software tools for staying in touch

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an enormous amount of changes in how people work, play, and communicate. By now, many of us have settled into the routine of using remote communication or video conferencing tools to keep in touch with our friends and family. In the last few weeks we've also seen a number of lists and guides aiming to get people set up with the "right" tools for communicating in hard times, but in almost every case, these articles recommend that people make a difficult compromise: trading their freedom in order to communicate with the people they care about and work with.

In times like these it becomes all the more important to remember that tools like Zoom, Slack, and Facebook Messenger are not benign public services, and while the sentiment they've expressed to the global community in responding to the crisis may be sincere, it hasn't addressed the fundamental ethical issues with any piece of proprietary software.

After taking the LibrePlanet 2020 conference online, we received a number of requests asking us to document our streaming setup. As the pandemic grew worse, this gave way to more curiosity about how the Free Software Foundation (FSF) uses free tools and free communication platforms to conduct our everyday business. And while the stereotype of hackers hunched over a white on black terminal session applies to us in some ways, many of the tools we use are available in any environment, even for people who do not have a lot of technical experience. We've started documenting ethical solutions on the LibrePlanet wiki, in addition to starting a remote communication mailing list to help each other advocate for their use.

In the suggestions that follow, a few of the tools we will recommend depend upon some "self-reliance," that is, steering clear of proprietary network services by hosting free software solutions yourself, or asking a technical friend to do it for you. It's a difficult step, and the benefits may not be immediately obvious, but it's a key part of preserving your autonomy in an age of ubiquitous digital control.

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Jitsi Meet in the News Still

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Jitsi Meet: A futuristic video conferencing app you should check out

    Enter 'Jitsi Meet,' a state-of-the-art free and open source project that deploys a scalable and secure video conferencing solution for all the social activities you have been missing. By making it an open-source project that runs on Java WebRTC application, the creators have provided an option for developers to work on the code, improve quality, and develop better iterations of the product.

    Jitsi has no limit on the number of participants or the duration of calls, and the user will never be asked to create an account whatsoever. All you need to do is to create a string of characters to start a new meeting or join one that already exists.

  • What Is Jitsi and Is it More Secure Than Zoom?

    The Jitsi Meet web app and smartphone apps are incredibly simple to use. You don’t have to worry about having a username or signing up for the service. Type a name for your Jitsi video conferencing room, and press Go. Share the name of the room with your friends, family, or colleagues, and they can begin joining you.

  • OSS video conferencing service 'Jitsi Meet' will support end-to-end encryption

    End-to-end encryption (E2EE) solves this problem. WebRTC E2EE can be implemented simply by adding the encryption function to the existing application. It can be used by enabling the function ' Insertable Streams ' under development in the Chromium engine, which makes it possible to process the data exchanged with WebRTC with a browser, and it will be possible to pass JVB encrypted communication as it is thing.

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More in Tux Machines

Septor 2020.5

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2) System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020 Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1 Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2 Update Tor to 0.4.4.5 Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20 Read more

Incremental backup with Butterfly Backup

This article explains how to make incremental or differential backups, with a catalog available to restore (or export) at the point you want, with Butterfly Backup. Read more

Regressions in GNU/Linux Evolution

  • When "progress" is backwards

    Lately I see many developments in the linux FOSS world that sell themselves as progress, but are actually hugely annoying and counter-productive. Counter-productive to a point where they actually cause major regressions, costs, and as in the case of GTK+3 ruin user experience and the possibility that we'll ever enjoy "The year of the Linux desktop". [...] We live in an era where in the FOSS world one constantly has to relearn things, switch to new, supposedly "better", but more bloated solutions, and is generally left with the impression that someone is pulling the rug from below one's feet. Many of the key changes in this area have been rammed through by a small set of decision makers, often closely related to Red Hat/Gnome/freedesktop.org. We're buying this "progress" at a high cost, and one can't avoid asking oneself whether there's more to the story than meets the eye. Never forget, Red Hat and Microsoft (TM) are partners and might even have the same shareholders.

  • When "progress" is backwards

Graphics: Vulkan, Intel and AMD

  • NVIDIA Ships Vulkan Driver Beta With Fragment Shading Rate Control - Phoronix

    This week's Vulkan 1.2.158 spec release brought the fragment shading rate extension to control the rate at which fragments are shaded on a per-draw, per-primitive, or per-region basis. This can be useful similar to OpenGL and Direct3D support for helping to allow different, less important areas of the screen be shaded less than areas requiring greater detail/focus. NVIDIA on Tuesday released the 455.26.02 Linux driver (and 457.00 version for Windows) that adds this fragment shading rate extension.

  • Intel Begins Adding Alder Lake Graphics Support To Their Linux Driver - Phoronix

    Intel has begun adding support for Alderlake-S to their open-source Linux kernel graphics driver. An initial set of 18 patches amounting to just around 300 lines of new kernel code was sent out today for beginning the hardware enablement work on Alderlake-S from the graphics side. Yes, it's only a few hundred lines of new driver code due to Alder Lake leveraging the existing Gen12/Tigerlake support. The Alder Lake driver patches similarly re-use some of the same workarounds and changes as set for the 14nm Rocket Lake processors with Gen12 graphics coming out in Q1.

  • AMD Linux Driver Preparing For A Navi "Blockchain" Graphics Card - Phoronix

    While all eyes are on the AMD Radeon RX 6000 "Big Navi" graphics cards set to be announced next week, it also looks like AMD is preparing for a Navi 1x "Blockchain" graphics card offering given the latest work in their open-source Linux driver. Patches posted today provide support for a new Navi graphics card referred to as the "navi10 blockchain SKU." The Navi 10 part has a device ID of 0x731E. From the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver perspective, the only difference from the existing Navi 10 GPU support is these patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support with this new SKU not having any display support.