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Browsers: Chrome 61, Mozilla Against Software Patents, Firefox Photon, and Tor 7.0

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Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

How open source is advancing the Semantic Web

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OSS
Web

The Semantic Web, a term coined by World Wide Web (WWW) inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, refers to the concept that all the information in all the websites on the internet should be able to interoperate and communicate. That vision, of a web of knowledge that supplies information to anyone who wants it, is continuing to emerge and grow.

In the first generation of the WWW, Web 1.0, most people were consumers of content, and if you had a web presence it was comprised of a series of static pages conveyed in HTML. Websites had guest books and HTML forms, powered by Perl and other server-side scripting languages, that people could fill out. While HTML provides structure and syntax to the web, it doesn't provide meaning; therefore Web 1.0 couldn't inject meaning into the vast resources of the WWW.

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Chrome 59 and Chromium

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Google
OSS
Web

Broswers: Chrome, Servo, and Firefox

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Web
  • Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

    Publishers will get a six-month headsup before Google kills intrusive advertising on Chrome, sources close to the ad giant have reportedly said.

    Google will also hand online publishers a special tool to make sure that their ads are "compliant", the WSJ was told, called "Ad Experience Reports" – ostensibly to be based on the recommendations of industry group the Coalition for Better Ads, of which Facebook and Google are members.

  • flatpak-ing Servo Nightly

    Servo - that rendering engine written in Rust - can be built from source. But there are also nightly builds available.

  • Mozilla Brings Virtual Reality to all Firefox Users

    We are delighted to announce that WebVR will ship on by default for all Windows users with an HTC VIVE or Oculus Rift headset in Firefox 55 (currently scheduled for August 8th). WebVR transforms Virtual Reality (VR) into a first-class experience on the web, giving it the infinite possibilities found in the openness and interoperability of the Web Platform. When coupled with WebGL to render 3D graphics, these APIs transform the browser into a platform that allows VR content to be published to the Web and instantaneously consumed from any capable VR device.

Web Browsers: WebAssembly and Mozilla's Open-Source Hackathon

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Google
Moz/FF
Web

  • Goodbye PNaCl, Hello WebAssembly!

    Historically, running native code on the web required a browser plugin. In 2013, we introduced the PNaCl sandbox to provide a means of building safe, portable, high-performance apps without plugins. Although this worked well in Chrome, it did not provide a solution that worked seamlessly across all browsers.

  • Google Plans End To PNaCl Support In Favor Of WebAssembly

    The Portable Native Client (PNaCl) ecosystem hasn't been too vibrant for executing native code in web-browsers given its lack of adoption outside of Google/Chrome and other factors. With WebAssembly seeing much broader adoption and inroads, Google is planning to end PNaCl.

  • Mozilla’s Giant, Distributed, Open-Source Hackathon

    Mozilla’s annual Global Sprint is scheduled for June 1 and 2. It’s an international public event: an opportunity for anyone, anywhere to energize their open-source projects with fresh insight and input from around the world.

    Participants include biostatisticians from Brazil, research scientists from Canada, engineers from Nepal, gamers from the U.S., and fellows from Princeton University. In years past, hundreds of individuals in more than 35 cities have participated in the Global Sprint.

Proprietary Browsers and Proprietary Games

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Software
Web
Gaming
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Web Browser to Let You Control New Tab Behavior Through Extensions

    The development of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.10 web browser continues at fast pace, and today we see the availability of a new snapshot, versioned 1.10.838.7, which implements more new features, but also fixes several regressions.

    Coming only one week after the previous snapshot, which added a new way to sort downloads, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.10.838.7 is the third in this development cycle, and it attempts to implement a new functionality that promises to allow users to control the behavior of new tabs directly from extensions. It will be located under Settings -> Tabs -> New Tab Page -> Control by Extension.

  • Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook

    Vivaldi, which was created by Opera's co-founder and former CEO, continues along its own path, focusing on privacy, security, and interesting enhancements to tabbed browsing. Vivaldi hit version 1.9 last week and now lets you "plant trees as you surf."

  • Wednesday Madness, a quick look at some good Linux gaming deals
  • Project Zomboid adds vehicles in a new beta

    I've tested it and as they mentioned in the announcement forum post, it is an early work in progress. Cars have no sound, sometimes other textures go on top of the car which looks weird and there are other issues. Even so, it's still awesome to finally be able to play around with vehicles to move around the map quicker.

4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

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Linux
Security
Web

There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

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Chrome 58 Released

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Google
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 58 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

  • Chrome 58 Makes Its Debut

    Not long after the Firefox 53 release, Google has promoted Chrome 58 to stable.

    Chrome 58 is now available with a number of fixes, new features, and a number of security fixes too. A list of the CVE fixes can be found in the release announcement.

  • Google Promotes Chrome 58 to Stable Channel with 29 Security Fixes, Improvements

    Google announced a few moments ago the promotion of the Chrome 58 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

Web/Browsers

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Web
  • Weblate 2.13.1

    Weblate 2.13.1 has been released quickly after 2.13. It fixes few minor issues and possible upgrade problem.

  • Vivaldi 1.9 Development Continues, Web Browser Now Based on Chromium 58

    We told you last week that development of the Vivaldi 1.9 web browser kicked off in style with the first snapshot, which brought numerous improvements to existing features, as well as some new ones.

    At the request of many users, Vivaldi 1.9 will let you shuffle the order of your extensions, and today's Vivaldi 1.9.811.13 snapshot is here to make it easier to fine tune screenshots taken with the built-in screenshot tool, but also to improve the URL autocomplete functionality and the Chromecasting Tab.

  • Google deprecates Octane JavaScript benchmark, because everyone is basically cheating

    Google has announced that its widely used Octane JavaScript benchmark is being retired, with Google saying that it's no longer a useful way for browser developers to determine how best to optimize their JavaScript engines.

    Octane was developed for and by the developers of V8, the JavaScript engine used in Chrome. It was intended to address flaws in the earlier SunSpider benchmark, developed by Apple's Safari team. SunSpider's tests were all microbenchmarks, sometimes testing something as small as a single operation performed thousands of times. It wasn't very representative of real-world code, and it was arguably being gamed, with browser vendors introducing optimizations that were aimed primarily, albeit not exclusively, at boosting SunSpider scores. This was being done even when those optimizations were detrimental to real-world performance, because having a good score carried so much prestige.

  • Chrome 59 To Support Headless Mode

    Chrome 59 stable isn't expected until early June, but when this release comes it will bring with it an interesting feature: a headless mode.

    Chrome's headless mode is made for headless/server environments, such as where you may automatically want to be capturing screenshots of rendered pages, etc. This is very practical for automated testing. Or there's the use-case of just wanting to interact with the DOM but not caring about presenting the contents on any connected physical display.

3 open source boilerplate web design templates

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OSS
Web

In the olden days, creating a website from scratch was easy.

With a basic understanding of HTML, and maybe a little CSS, you could put together a pretty functional web page with very little effort. Throw it onto your web server, and you were good to go.

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DistroWatch The Best Website For Distro Hoppers

The DistroWatch features release announcements of new versions of hundreds of Linux and other distributions. It does host reviews of distros, podcasts, and newsletters. DistroWatch first published by Ladislav Bodnar, the founder, and maintainer, on May 31, 2001. DistroWatch initially focused on Linux distributions. But later based on user requests, it went on adding different flavors of operating systems like BSD family, Android x86, Oracle Solaris, MINIX, and Haiku etc. The DistroWatch presents detailed information at one place in a very convenient manner. At the time of writing this article, the DistroWatch hosted information of more than 300 active distributions (referring the list of distros populated under drop-down feature on the first page of the DistroWatch) and more than hundred in queue. It is said that the DistroWatch lives out of advertising and donation. LinuxCD.org is the first to advertise on the DistroWatch site. Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS Amazon Linux AMIs Now Support Amazon's SSM Agent

As of July 2018, Amazon's Linux AMIs (Amazon Machine Images) that are based on either the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) or Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems now come pre-installed with the AWS Systems Manager Agent (SSM Agent), an Amazon software designed to run on hybrid or Amazon EC2 instances in public and private clouds on AWS (Amazon Web Services). "With this new feature release, AWS Systems Manager Agent is installed by default on all instances launched or built from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (2018.07 and later) and 18.04 LTS (all versions) AMIs," said Amazon. "By having the agent pre-installed, you can quickly start using AWS Systems Manager features such as Run Command, State Manager, Inventory and Patch Manager." Read more

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