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Google, Money and Censorship in Free Software communities

Filed under
Google
Web
Debian

Alexander Wirt (formorer) has tried to justify censoring the mailing list in various ways. Wirt is also one of Debian's GSoC administrators and mentors, it appears he has a massive conflict of interest when censoring posts about Google.

Wirt has also made public threats to censor other discussions, for example, the DebConf Israel debate. The challenges of holding a successful event in that particular region require a far more mature approach.

Why are these donations and conflicts of interest hidden from the free software community who rely on, interact with contribute to Debian in so many ways? Why doesn't Debian provide a level playing field, why does money from Google get this veil of secrecy?

[...]

Google also operates a mailing list for mentors in Google Summer of Code. It looks a lot like any other free software community mailing list except for one thing: censorship.

Look through the "Received" headers of messages on the mailing list and you can find examples of messages that were delayed for some hours waiting for approval. It is not clear how many messages were silently censored, never appearing at all.

Recent attempts to discuss the issue on Google's own mailing list produced an unsurprising result: more censorship.

Read more

6 open source web browser alternatives

Filed under
OSS
Web

Open source web browsers have come a long way since Microsoft dominated the web browser market with its closed source Internet Explorer (IE). For many years, IE was the standard browser for Microsoft's Windows operating system, while Safari (also closed source) was the default browser for MacOS. Then Mozilla's introduction of Firefox, followed by Google's release of Chrome, sparked a revolution in open source internet browsers. Those two are extremely well known but are not the only open source browsers available.

This article introduces seven open source browsers, summarizes their features, and shares how you can contribute to them.

Read more

Horde vs Roundcube vs Squirrelmail - Which Works Best

Filed under
Server
Software
Web

Webmail is a great way to access your emails from different devices and when you are away from your home. Now, most web hosting companies include email with their server plans. And all of them offer the same three, webmail clients as well: RoundCube, Horde, and SquirrelMail. They are part of the cPanel - most popular hosting control panel.

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Proprietary Vivaldi 2.6 Released

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Vivaldi browser blocks abusive ads, improves profile management and more

    At Vivaldi, we continue to focus on our two hallmarks – privacy and customization. We are always looking to enhance what a browser should provide, and the latest version of Vivaldi has a handful of new features that do just that.

    We’ve improved security by blocking advertisements on sites with abusive ad practices. There are new ways to navigate quicker, customize user profiles along with overall improvements that add more flexibility to Vivaldi’s intuitive user interface.

  • Vivaldi 2.6 Released with Improved Security & User Profile

    Vivaldi web browser released new stable version 2.6 today with improved security, profile management and more.

  • Browse the Web More Securely with Vivaldi Browser 2.6

    Vivaldi 2.6 released with improvements and new features.

    Vivaldi is free and open source cross platform web browser. Vivaldi is fairly new in web world where Chrome, Firefox, Opera are already playing. Vivaldi is a Chromium based browser targeted to the technical users than generic users having a minimal UI, icons and tabs. Here’s a quick rundown of Vivaldi’s features.

  • Vivaldi to give abusive sites the middle finger with built-in ad blocking

    Amid Google's huffing and puffing over ad blockers, an update to Chromium-based browser Vivaldi puts privacy squarely in its sights.

    The release, version 2.6, is not quite the feature-fest of previous builds, but contains a couple of standout tweaks to please those fed up with advertisers and online trackers, and others who like things just so.

Tails 3.14.1 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Web
Debian

This release is an emergency release to fix a critical security vulnerability in Tor Browser.

It also fixes other security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

Read more

Also: It's Time to Switch to a Privacy Browser

12 Best Web Browsers for Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Selecting the best web browsers for Ubuntu largely depends on your personal needs, but usually, browsers are used for accessing/browsing websites.

In this article, we will look under the hood and highlight some of the best web browsers for Ubuntu.

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Browsers: Firefox Upselling and Branding, Chromium-Based Browsers Will Ignore Google’s Ad-Blocking Ban

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • This Free software ain't free to make, pal, it's expensive: Mozilla to bankroll Firefox with paid-for premium extras

    Mozilla is planning to launch a suite of paid-for subscription services to complement its free and open-source Firefox browser in October.

    CEO Chris Beard elaborated on the plan, mentioned in the company's bug reporting system eleven months ago, to German technology site T3N last week. In an interview, he said Mozilla's premium service plan will include VPN bandwidth above what's available from Mozilla's ProtonMail VPN partnership.

    He suggested the arrangement will augment a free VPN tier. That would be a change from the current $10 per month ProtonMail VPN arrangement, one that resembles the free VPN offering from the competing Opera browser. He also suggested the service bundle will include an allotment of secure cloud storage, though it isn't yet clear how much storage will be included or whether "secure" means user-held encryption keys.

  • Firefox 68 Beta 10 Testday, June 14th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, June 14th we are organizing Firefox 68 Beta 10 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Sync & Firefox Account and Browser notifications & prompts.

    Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

  • Mozilla Open Design Blog: Firefox: The Evolution Of A Brand

    Consider the fox. It’s known for being quick, clever, and untamed — attributes easily applied to its mythical cousin, the “Firefox” of browser fame. Well, Firefox has another trait not found in earthly foxes: stretchiness. (Just look how it circumnavigates the globe.) That fabled flexibility now enables Firefox to adapt once again to a changing environment.

    The “Firefox” you’ve always known as a browser is stretching to cover a family of products and services united by putting you and your privacy first. Firefox is a browser AND an encrypted service to send huge files. It’s an easy way to protect your passwords on every device AND an early warning if your email has been part of a data breach. Safe, private, eye-opening. That’s just the beginning of the new Firefox family.

    Now Firefox has a new look to support its evolving product line. Today we’re introducing the Firefox parent brand — an icon representing the entire family of products. When you see it, it’s your invitation to join Firefox and gain access to everything we have to offer. That includes the famous Firefox Browser icon for desktop and mobile, and even that icon is getting an update to be rolled out this fall.

  • Chromium-Based Browsers Will Ignore Google’s Ad-Blocking Ban

    Brave Opera and Vivaldi will not implement Google’s changes that will cripple ad-blockers.

    Commercial web browsers including Brave, Opera, and Vivaldi won’t be disabling ad blocker extensions as desired by Google. These browsers are based on the the same open source codebase that is used with Google Chrome. Google maintains an open source project called Chromium as the base of its Chrome browsers.

    According to ZDnet, “At the end of May, Google made a new announcement in which it said that the old technology that ad blockers were relying on would only be available for Chrome enterprise users, but not for regular users.”

Deluge BitTorrent Client 2.0

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Deluge BitTorrent Client 2.0 Released With Sequential Downloads, Now Uses Python3 And Gtk3

    Deluge BitTorrent client has reached version 2.0 stable recently, after more than 2 years since the previous stable release. The new stable Deluge version comes with major changes, including code ported to Python 3, Gtk UI ported to Gtk 2, sequential downloads support, a new logo, and much more.

    Deluge is a free and open source BitTorrent client that runs on Linux, Windows, macOS and *BSD. It's written in Python, and it includes a text console, a web interface, and a graphical desktop interface that uses Gtk.

  • Deluge 2.0.0 Major version is Released after continuous development of 2 Years and 5 Months

    The Deluge development team is proudly announced the new major version release of Deluge 2.0.0 on 06 June, 2019.

    In the following days (Deluge 2.0.1 on 07 June, 2019 & Deluge 2.0.2 on 08 June, 2019), they had been released the minor version of Deluge in the same branch to fix some of the issue, which have reported by users.

  • Welcome to the Deluge BitTorrent Project

    Latest Deluge release 2.0.2 available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows.

From student message board to open-source CMS: a Q&A with the creator of Drupal

Filed under
Software
Interviews
Drupal
Web

Drupal has completely changed the way large organisations think about and build their digital estate.

The open source content management system (CMS), which was founded in the year 2000, is now used by some of the world’s biggest brands like Warner Music, Virgin Sport, Princess Cruises and Wilson because of its ability to handle huge spikes of web traffic and because of how it enables marketers to manage their brand digitally on a global level.

TechRadar Pro recently had the opportunity to interview the creator of Drupal, Dries Buytaert who told us how he came to create the CMS and gave us insight into what's in store for future versions...

Read more

Also: Acquia Lightning Revamped, Enonic 7.0 Released, More Open Source News [Ed: Drupal founder now selling better performance]

Exim and GNU Screen Patched

Filed under
GNU
Security
Web
  • New RCE vulnerability impacts nearly half of the internet's email servers

    A critical remote command execution (RCE) security flaw impacts over half of the Internet's email servers, security researchers from Qualys have revealed today.

    The vulnerability affects Exim, a mail transfer agent (MTA), which is software that runs on email servers to relay emails from senders to recipients.

    According to a June 2019 survey of all mail servers visible on the Internet, 57% (507,389) of all email servers run Exim -- although different reports would put the number of Exim installations at ten times that number, at 5.4 million.

  • CVE-2019-10149 Exim 4.87 to 4.91

    We received a report of a possible remote exploit. Currently there is no evidence of an active use of this exploit.

    A patch exists already, is being tested, and backported to all versions we released since (and including) 4.87.

    The severity depends on your configuration. It depends on how close to the standard configuration your Exim runtime configuration is. The closer the better.

    Exim 4.92 is not vulnerable.

  • GNU Screen MScrollV Function Denial of Service Vulnerability [CVE-2015-6806]

    A vulnerability in the MScrollV function of GNU Screen could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to cause a denial of service (DoS) condition on a targeted system.

    The vulnerability exists because the MScrollV function, as defined in the ansi.c source code file of the affected software, does not properly limit recursion. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a request that submits malicious input to the targeted system. A successful exploit could trigger a stack overflow condition, resulting in a DoS condition.Proof-of-concept (PoC) code that demonstrates an exploit of this vulnerability is publicly available. GNU has confirmed the vulnerability and released software updates.

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Android Leftovers

Free Software program Basis Provides Advantages and Merchandise In Its Annual Fundraiser

An nameless reader writes: The Free Software program Basis is holding its annual fundraiser, with a aim of attracting 600 new members by the tip of December. (New members to date: 112.) “We’re nonetheless combating the oppressive nature of proprietary software program,” explains the marketing campaign’s net web page. “Now we have made strong inroads, and the neighborhood is as passionate as ever.” As a 501(c)(3) charity the group’s membership dues are all tax deductible, and affiliate memberships are simply $10 a month ($5 for college kids). They arrive with particular advantages together with as much as 5 electronic mail aliases within the member.fsf.org area, eligibility to hitch the nonprofit Digital Credit score Union, free admission to the annual LibrePlanet convention in Boston, and 20% reductions on FSF merchandise and GNU gear (together with this pleasant stuffed child gnu). Read more Also: Mark J. Wielaard: Software Freedom Conservancy Donor Match

Python Programming: Python 3, MicroPython, Creating Command Line Utilities and Installing/Updating Packages in Python

  • It’s Time to Upgrade to Python 3 – Time Is Running Out!

    As of January 1, 2020, Anaconda will no longer be adding new packages built for Python 2.7 to repo.anaconda.com default channels. The Python 2.7 packages available prior to that date will remain available. This means, for instance, that if there is a newly released version of TensorFlow after the first of the new year – it will not be available in defaults for Python 2.7. The one exception is that Python 2.7.18 is slated to be released in mid-April 2020 according to PEP-0373. Packages for Python 2.7.18 will be built and made available on the repo.anaconda.com defaults channel.

  • MicroPython: An Intro to Programming Hardware in Python

    Are you interested in the Internet of Things, home automation, and connected devices? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to build a blaster, a laser sword, or even your own robot? If so, then you’re in luck! MicroPython can help you do all of those things and more. [...] Python’s popularity has skyrocketed in recent years. These days, it’s used everywhere from DevOps to statistical analysis, and even in desktop software. But for a long time, there was one field where Python use was conspicuously missing. Developers working with microcontrollers had not yet adopted the language. All of that changed in 2013 when Damien George launched a Kickstarter campaign. Damien, an undergraduate at Cambridge University, was an avid robot programmer. He wanted to move the Python world from machines that worked with capacities in the gigabytes down to the kilobytes. His Kickstarter campaign was an attempt to back his development while he turned his proof of concept into a finished implementation. Many developers jumped at the chance, not only to use Python on microcontrollers but also to get an early version of Damien’s own reference hardware, which was built especially for the task! In fact, by the end of the campaign, Damien had blown past his £15,000 goal. Thanks to over 1,900 backers, he reached just shy of £100,000.

  • Creating Command Line Utilities with Python's argparse

    Most of the user-facing software comes with a visually pleasing interface or via a decorated webpage. At other times, a program can be so small that it does not warrant an entire graphical user interface or web application to expose its functionality to the end-user. In these cases, we can build programs that are accessible via a Command Line Interface, or CLI. In this post, we will explore Python's argparse module and use it to build a simple command-line tool to help us shorten URLs swiftly.

  • Learn all About Installing & Updating Packages in Python

    In this tutorial, we will learn the basics of installing, working and updating packages in Python. First, we will learn how to install Python packages, then how to use them, and finally, how to update Python packages when needed. More specifically, we are going to learn how to install and upgrade packages using pip, conda, and Anaconda Navigator. Now, before we are going to learn how to install Python packages we are going to answer the question “what is a package in Python?”

Facebook's New Linux Slab Memory Controller Saving 30~40%+ Of Memory, Less Fragmentation

Back in September we wrote about Facebook's Roman Gushchin working on a new slab memory controller/allocator implementation that in turn could provide better memory utilization and less slab memory usage. This wasn't ready in time for the 5.5 kernel but a revised patch series was sent out last week. Roman continues to talk up this new slab memory controller with it turning out much better than the existing slab memory code, which he says in Facebook production workloads is only seeing 45~65% slab utilization and at best case around 85%. This controller rework aims for better slab utilization and also sharing of slab pages between multiple memory cgroups. The memory accounting is done now per-object rather than per-page, among other changes. Read more Also: KubeCon gets bigger, the kernel gets better, and more industry trends