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FOSS content management systems (CMS)

Filed under
OSS
Drupal
Web
  • How to Resolve Your Open Content Management Quandary

    After years of development and competition, open source content management systems (CMS) have proliferated and are very powerful tools for building, deploying and managing web sites, blogs and more. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla.

    As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue. The good news is that free, sophisticated guides for evaluating CMS systems have flourished. There are even good options for trying open CMS systems online before you choose one. Here, in this newly updated post, you'll find some very good resources.

    he first thing to pursue as you evaluate CMS systems to deploy, including the many free, good platforms, is an overview of what is available. CMSMatrix.org is a great site for plotting out side-by-side comparisons of what CMS systems have to offer. In fact, it lets you compare the features in over 1200 content management system products. Definitely take a look. This site also has a good overview of the options.

  • Postleaf is an open-source blogging platform for the design-conscious

    Content management systems are boring until you have to use one. You can install a little Drupal or WordPress, pick up some Squarespace, or just dump to Medium, the graveyard for posts about protein shakes and VC funding. But what if you could roll your own CMS? And what if you made it really cool?

    That’s what Cory LaViska did. LaViska is the founder of SurrealCMS and has been making it easy to edit stuff on the web for nine years. Rather than build and sell an acceptable CMS, however, he took all of his best ideas and made a far better CMS. And he made it open source and called it Postleaf.

Death of Adobe Trash (Flash)

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Google
Web
  • Chrome to make Flash mostly-dead in early December [Ed: but do we replace one blob with another? (Chrome is proprietary)]

    Google yesterday set an early December deadline for purging most Flash content from its Chrome browser, adding that it will take an interim step next month when it stops rendering Flash-based page analytics.

    In a post to a company blog, Anthony LaForge, a technical program manager on the Chrome team, said the browser would refuse to display virtually all Flash content starting with version 55, which is scheduled for release the week of Dec. 5.

    Previously, Google had used a broader deadline of this year's fourth quarter for quashing all Flash content except for that produced by a select list of 10 sites, including Amazon, Facebook and YouTube.

  • Google Chrome's plan to kill Flash kicks into high gear

    Google is getting serious about ending the reign of Adobe Flash on the web.

    The company recently detailed a timeline for bringing Flash on Chrome to an end—kind of. Even in these late stages of Flash’s life on the web you still can’t kill it off entirely. Instead, Google says it will “de-emphasize” Flash to the point where it’s almost never used except when absolutely necessary.

  • HTML5 Wins: Google Chrome Is Officially Killing Flash Next Month

    With an aim to bring security, better battery life, and faster load times, Google is de-emphasizing Flash next month. After this change in Chrome 53, the behind-the-scenes Flash will be blocked in favor of HTML5. Later, with Chrome 55, HTML5 will be made the default choice while loading a web page.

Web Sites' FOSS

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Govstrap.io enables rapid deployment of UK government websites

    United Kingdom government websites can now be deployed within minutes by re-using the familiar theme produced by Government Digital Services (GDS) in combination with the Bootstrap framework.

    The open source software specialist OpusVL has made it possible to take the official Gov.UK website theme, which is under the MIT license, and reproduce it quickly and easily using Bootstrap, which originated from Twitter. Bootstrap is an HTML, CSS, and JavaScript framework for creating front end websites and applications. With an increase in the variety of devices used to view websites, Bootstrap is a standard tool kit for building responsive design, and enabling websites to be mobile- and tablet-friendly.

  • Concrete5 Releases Version 8 Beta, More Open Source CMS News

    Portland, Ore.-based concrete5 released its version 8 beta for testing and feedback. It's good for site builders who are comfortable reporting and fixing bugs, and who are prepared to build their test sites from scratch. Just remember: Beta releases are never recommended for production websites.

    Technology evangelist Jessica Dunbar called it "a key milestone and is the work of more than 230 contributors." To find out about the new features, see what’s in store for version 8.

Qt WebBrowser 1.0

Filed under
OSS
Web

We have recently open sourced Qt WebBrowser!

Read more

Also: Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Open-Sourced

How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer

Filed under
Linux
Server
Web
HowTos

Welcome to small tutorial series of hosting website on Linux machine. This series of articles will teach how to setup a web server on Linux computer and make it available online. The website we'll host on our personal computer can be accessed from around the globe. In this article(Part 1), we are going to install all the required tools to setup web server. So let's get started and start our own setup web server. ​

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Web browsers for GNU/Linux

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Web
  • Best Graphical Web Browsers for Linux

    Web Browsers is one of the top most contributor of Computer desktops. As we know, we can’t do any work in system without browser help like, for browsing something, checking mails, net banking access, chatting, etc.., here I’m going to show you modern web browsers which is in active, under development and widely using in Linux Desktops.

  • Latest Vivaldi Browser Snapshot Improves Tab Hibernation on GNU/Linux Distros

    Today, July 11, 2016, Vivaldi released a new snapshot version for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows, bringing multiple fixes and improvements.

Web Browsers

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • WebVR Shell: Google Is Making Every Website On The Web Viewable In VR

    Boosting its efforts in the virtual reality technology, Google has brought the WebVR APIs to its Chrome web browser. In near future, one should expect a richer web full of VR-enabled websites that a person can explore using a VR headset.

  • Context Graph: It’s time to bring context back to the web

    The largest button on a modern browser is the back button. Trips to the web are short. Enter a search, get a result, click back, then try again. This feels backwards (forgive the pun!). What if there was a better forward button? One that helps you understand a topic better or find alternative solutions to a problem you’re solving? What if web browsers were immediately useful instead of demanding input when you launched them? Browsers could do so much more, through a better understanding of your behavior and by using the experience of people at human-scale to give you content that enriches your life, regardless of whom you know or where you live.

  • Mozilla Is Looking To Build A Recommendation System: Context Graph

    If Mozilla didn't already have their hands full with enough projects, the latest they are looking to engage in is a recommendation system to potentially upset the likes of Facebook and Google when it comes to looking for similar sites/resources.

  • This Coder Shows How To Play Games Inside A PDF File

    A GitHub user named Omar Rizwan has found a way to put games in PDF files. He even coded his own game after taking help from a tutorial. Rizwan has put the details of this Horrifying PDF Experiments on his repository.

Servo Nightly for GNU/Linux

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Moz/FF
Web
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Initial Retpoline Support Added To LLVM For Spectre v2 Mitigation
    The LLVM code has been merged to mainline for the Retpoline x86 mitigation technique for Spectre Variant 2. This will be back-ported to LLVM 6.0 and also LLVM 5.0 with an immediate point release expected to get this patched compiler out in the wild. The compiler-side work -- similar to GCC's Retpoline code -- is to avoid generating code where an indirect branch could have its prediction poisoned by a rogue actor. The Retpoline support uses indirect calls in a non-speculatable way.
  • Teen Hacker Who Social Engineered His Way Into Top-Level US Government Officials' Accounts Pleads Guilty To Ten Charges
    The teenage hacker who tore CIA director John Brennan a new AOL-hole is awaiting sentencing in the UK. Kane Gamble, the apparent founder of hacker collective Crackas With Attitude, was able to access classified documents Brennan has forwarded to his personal email account by posing as a Verizon tech. Social engineering is still the best hacking tool. It's something anyone anywhere can do. If you do it well, a whole host of supposedly-secured information can be had, thanks to multiple entities relying on the same personal identifiers to "verify" the social engineer they're talking to is the person who owns accounts they're granting access to. Despite claiming he was motivated by American injustices perpetrated around the world (Palestine is namechecked in the teen's multiple mini-manifestos), a lot of what Gamble participated in was plain, old fashioned harassment.
  • The Guardian view on cyberwar: an urgent problem [Ed: Lists several attacks by Microsoft Windows (but names neither)]
    The first known, and perhaps the most successful of these, was the joint US/Israeli Stuxnet attack on the Iranian nuclear programme in 2009. Since then there has been increasing evidence of attacks of this sort by Russia – against Estonia in 2009, and then against Ukraine, where tens of thousands of attacks on everything from power supplies to voting machines have opened an under-reported front in an under-reported war. Across the Baltic, the Swedish government has just announced a beefed-up programme of civil defence, of which the most substantial part will be an attempt to protect its software and networks from attacks. Meanwhile, North Korean state hackers are blamed by western intelligence services for the WannaCry ransomware attacks which last year shut down several NHS hospitals in the UK. Persistent reports suggest the US has interfered in this way with North Korea’s nuclear missile programme.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #143
  • Don’t Install Meltdown And Spectre Patches, Intel Warns It Would Increase System Reebots
  • On that Spectre mitigations discussion
    By now, almost everybody has probably seen the press coverage of Linus Torvalds's remarks about one of the patches addressing Spectre variant 2. Less noted, but much more informative, is David Woodhouse's response on why those patches are the way they are.

Tails 3.5 Anonymous OS Released to Mitigate Spectre Vulnerability for AMD CPUs

Tails, the open-source Linux-based operating system designed to protect user's privacy while surfing the Internet, also known as Anonymous OS, was updated today to version 3.5. Coming only two weeks after the Tails 3.4 release, which included patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities publicly disclosed earlier this month, today's Tails 3.5 update is here to bump the Linux kernel to version 4.14.13 and include the microcode firmware for AMD CPUs to mitigate the Spectre flaw. Read more

Graphics: Freedreno, Gallium3D, AMDGPU, RadeonSI, Mesa

  • Code Aurora Working On Adreno 6xx Support For Freedreno
    The Qualcomm-aligned Code Aurora is working on supporting the latest-generation Adreno A6xx graphics hardware with the open-source Freedreno+MSM driver stack.
  • Work Revised On Adding SPIR-V Support To Clover Gallium3D
    Last May we reported on a Nouveau developer adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's OpenCL state tracker. Finally the better part of one year later, Pierre Moreau is ready with the second version of these patches to accept this IR associated with Vulkan / OpenCL 2.1+ within Clover.
  • Trying Out DRM-Next For Linux 4.16 With AMDGPU On Polaris & Vega
    I have spent some time this weekend trying out the DRM-Next code slated for inclusion in Linux 4.16 when its merge window opens next week. The DRM-Next state of the AMDGPU driver appears to be in good shape, at least for the RX 580 and RX Vega cards used for my initial testing.
  • RadeonSI NIR Back-End Picks Up Support For More OpenGL Extensions
    It was just a few days ago that Valve Linux developer Timothy Arceri enabled GLSL 4.50 support for RadeonSI's NIR back-end after previously taking care of tessellation shaders and other requirements. Now he has taken to implementing some other extensions in RadeonSI's NIR code-path.
  • mesa 18.0-0-rc1
    The first release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available. The plan is to have one release candidate every Friday, until the anticipated final release on 9th February 2018. The expectation is that the 17.3 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly releases until the 18.0.1 release. NOTE: Building the SWR with LLVM 3.9 is currently not possible. Please use newer LLVM version until the issue is resolved. Here are the people which helped shape the current release.
  • Mesa 18.0 Now Under Feature Freeze With 18.0-RC1 Premiere
    Feature development on Mesa 18.0 has now ended with the release today of 18.0-RC1 following the code-base being branched. Emil Velikov of Collabora just announced the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC1. As usual, he's planning on weekly release candidates until the 18.0.0 stable release is ready to ship. Velikov tentatively expects to ship Mesa 18.0.0 around 9 February, but as we know from past releases, it might end up slipping by some days.

Using Dual 4K Monitors Stacked With GNOME

The setup for my main production system that is still on Fedora Workstation 26 with GNOME Shell 3.24.3 has been working out fine. The two displays are the ASUS MG28UQ monitors that work out well on their own and do work with AMDGPU FreeSync on Linux. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is enough to power the dual 3840 x 2160 displays for desktop tasks mostly limited to many terminals, Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, and other GNOME desktop applications. Certainly that lower-end Pascal GPU isn't fast enough for 4K gaming, but it's not like I have the time for any gaming and for a purely desktop system it's working out fine paired with the 387.34 proprietary driver on Fedora 26 paired with Linux 4.14. Read more