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4 of the Best Web Browsers for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

There are plenty of web browsers for Linux these days, but not all of them support all distros. This makes it a little bit difficult to choose, but there are some viable options that still work with the ecosystem. The choice isn’t just dependent on your Linux distribution, but also on your preferred use cases.

While Linux desktops offer most of the web browsers you’d use on Windows and Mac, there are some lesser-known browsers that aren’t available for the latter two operating systems.

Our top four picks for the best browsers you can use on Linux support the majority of most top distros, but your distro’s performance may vary for each of these browsers.

Here are four of the best web browsers for Linux.

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Android Browser Choice Screen in Europe

Filed under
Android
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Today, Google announced a new browser choice screen in Europe. We love an opportunity to show more people our products, like Firefox for Android. Independent browsers that put privacy and security first (like Firefox) are great for consumers and an important part of the Android ecosystem.

There are open questions, though, about how well this implementation of a choice screen will enable people to easily adopt options other than Chrome as their default browser. The details matter, and the true measure will be the impact on competition and ultimately consumers. As we assess the results of this launch on Mozilla’s Firefox for Android, we’ll share our impressions and the impact we see.

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The Rapid Progress Of The AV1 Video Format Over The Past Year

Filed under
Movies
Moz/FF
Web

Mozilla presented at the NAB Streaming Summit last week over the state of the royalty-free AV1 video format aiming to compete with H.265/HEVC and succeeding VP9 for open-source use-cases.

In particular, a lot of AV1 progress was made over the past year compared to when the bitstream wasn't finalized, poor encoder performance, lack of AV1 support, and slow adoption. 2018 also brought the introduction of the Dav1d AV1 video decoder, more members joining the AOMedia Foundation, and other advancements.

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Free Software in Web Multimedia

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • NAB 2019: Haivision Announces Peer-to-Peer Low-Latency Streaming for Its SRT Framework

    Prior to releasing SRT P2P to the open-source community, Haivision is seeking partners to collaborate and stress-test the technology at scale.

    [...]

    SRT P2P is the latest development for the SRT (Secure Reliable Transport) initiative that Haivision started in 2017 when the company open-sourced the SRT protocol and technology stack. SRT has been endorsed as a low-latency contribution and distribution streaming protocol by more than 200 companies across the broadcast and streaming industries. With a focus on video delivery, SRT P2P extends the SRT initiative to create a comprehensive framework for high-performance streaming from contribution through distribution and into delivery.

  • Netflix and Intel to Deploy AV1 CODEC For Content Streaming

    At The National Association of Broadcasters Show today, Intel and Netflix announced a new high-performance video codec that is available as open source and royalty-free to content creators, developers and service providers. Scalable Video Technology for AV1 (SVT-AV1) offers performance and scalability in video processing.

    AV1 is a royalty-free codec and offers improved compression compared to vp9 or hevc, the video bandwidth reduction can run upwards to 30 to 40 percent, without you seeing a difference. The best thing yet, this is a royalty-free model. 

  • NAB '19: Netflix and Intel Release SVT-AV1 Codec as Open Source

    This morning at NAB, Intel and Netflix together announced the SVT-AV1 codec which is capable of real-time 4K/60p 10-bit encoding when running on Intel Xeon Scalable processors and Intel Xeon D processors. To our knowledge, this is the first software-only AV1 implementation capable of real-time encoding and it represents an order of magnitude acceleration of AV1 encoding. The companies released SVT-AV1, or Scalable Video Technology for AV1, into the open source community for immediate availability.

Free Software Conquers the Web

Filed under
OSS
Web

Internet/WWW Software: Hugin 2019, Kiwi TCMS 6.7, Hugo Extended on CentOS 7, Curl Drops Pipelining

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Hugin 2019 Released! How to Install it in Ubuntu 18.04/16.04
  • Hugin-2019.0.0 Release Notes
  • Kiwi TCMS 6.7

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.7! This is a small improvement and bug-fix update.

  • Hugo Extended on CentOS 7
  • curl says bye bye to pipelining

    HTTP/1.1 Pipelining is the protocol feature where the client sends off a second HTTP/1.1 request already before the answer to the previous request has arrived (completely) from the server. It is defined in the original HTTP/1.1 spec and is a way to avoid waiting times. To reduce latency.

    HTTP/1.1 Pipelining was badly supported by curl for a long time in the sense that we had a series of known bugs and it was a fragile feature without enough tests. Also, pipelining is fairly tricky to debug due to the timing sensitivity so very often enabling debug outputs or similar completely changes the nature of the behavior and things are not reproducing anymore!

    HTTP pipelining was never enabled by default by the large desktop browsers due to all the issues with it, like broken server implementations and the likes. Both Firefox and Chrome dropped pipelining support entirely since a long time back now. curl did in fact over time become more and more lonely in supporting pipelining.

Security: DNS, Google and Facebook

Filed under
Security
Web
  • Waves of DNS hijacking attempts target mostly D-Link routers

    Waves of DNS hijackings over the past three months, aimed at consumer-grade routers mostly from D-Link, have been diverting traffic from a number of well-known domains and directing them elsewhere.

  • Ongoing DNS hijackings target unpatched consumer routers

    A wave of DNS hijacking attacks that abuse Google's cloud computing service is causing consumer routers to connect to fraudulent and potentially malicious websites and addresses, a security researcher has warned.

  • Hiding in Plain Sight

    Cisco Talos is continually working to ensure that our threat intelligence not only accounts for the latest threats but also new versions of old threats, such as spam. This often means pursuing cybercriminals wherever they congregate. However, instead of wheeling-and-dealing using hidden servers on some mysterious dark web address, a surprisingly large number of cyber scofflaws prefer to operate right out in the open using social media. For example, Facebook is host to dozens of groups that serve as online marketplaces and exchanges for cybercriminals. Talos saw spam from services advertised in these Facebook groups show up in our own telemetry data, indicating a potential impact to Cisco customers from these groups.

    Over the past several months, Cisco Talos has tracked several groups on Facebook where shady (at best) and illegal (at worst) activities frequently take place. The majority of these groups use fairly obvious group names, including "Spam Professional," "Spammer & Hacker Professional," "Buy Cvv On THIS SHOP PAYMENT BY BTC," and "Facebook hack (Phishing)." Despite the fairly obvious names, some of these groups have managed to remain on Facebook for up to eight years, and in the process acquire tens of thousands of group members.

  • Cybercrime On Facebook Is Of Least Concern To Its Executives

    There is no better time for committing Cybercrime on Facebook than right now. At least that’s the intent the platform is displaying with its least bothered attitude.

    Cisco Talos — an online security research group, has released a report showcasing in detail the fearless existence of cybercrime on Facebook.

Events: HTTP Workshop, foss-north and SUSECON

Filed under
OSS
Web
SUSE
  • Daniel Stenberg: Workshop Season 4 Finale

    The 2019 HTTP Workshop ended today. In total over the years, we have now done 12 workshop days up to now. This day was not a full day and we spent it on only two major topics that both triggered long discussions involving large parts of the room.

    [...]

    Mike Bishop did an excellent presentation of HTTP/3 for HTTP people that possibly haven’t kept up fully with the developments in the QUIC working group. From a plain HTTP view, HTTP/3 is very similar feature-wise to HTTP/2 but of course sent over a completely different transport layer. (The HTTP/3 draft.)

    Most of the questions and discussions that followed were rather related to the transport, to QUIC. Its encryption, it being UDP, DOS prevention, it being “CPU hungry” etc. Deploying HTTP/3 might be a challenge for successful client side implementation, but that’s just nothing compared the totally new thing that will be necessary server-side. Web developers should largely not even have to care…

    One tidbit that was mentioned is that in current Firefox telemetry, it shows about 0.84% of all requests negotiates TLS 1.3 early data (with about 12.9% using TLS 1.3)

    Thought-worthy quote of the day comes from Willy: “everything is a buffer”

  • Daniel Stenberg: The HTTP Workshop 2019 begins

    35 persons from all over the world walked in the room and sat down around the O-shaped table setup. Lots of known faces and representatives from a large variety of HTTP implementations, client-side or server-side – but happily enough also a few new friends that attend their first HTTP Workshop here. The companies with the most employees present in the room include Apple, Facebook, Mozilla, Fastly, Cloudflare and Google – all with three each I believe.

    Patrick Mcmanus started off the morning with his presentation on HTTP conventional wisdoms trying to identify what have turned out as successes or not in HTTP land in recent times. It triggered a few discussions on the specific points and how to judge them. I believe the general consensus ended up mostly agreeing with the slides. The topic of unshipping HTTP/0.9 support came up but is said to not be possible due to its existing use. As a bonus, Anne van Kesteren posted a new bug on Firefox to remove it.

  • foss-north 2019 – it is happening

    This years experiments are the training day, and community day. Looking at the various RSVPs for the community day, it looks like we’ll be 130+ attendees. For the conference days we have only ten tickets left out of 240, beating last years record attendance with 90 people.

  • The Openness Continues: SUSECON Day 2 Recap

    Michael Miller then took the stage, provided an overview of the day and then welcomed Dr. Thomas Di Giacomo, President of Engineering, Product and Innovation to the stage.  But before diving into this discussion for the day, Thomas introduced a new SUSE video instructing everyone on the proper way to say “SUSE”.

DRM and Free/Open Source Software Conflict

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • After years of insisting that DRM in HTML wouldn't block open source implementations, Google says it won't support open source implementations

    The absurd figleaf used to justify this was a reference implementation of EME in open source that only worked on video that didn't have the DRM turned on. The only people this impressed were people who weren't paying attention or lacked the technical depth to understand that a tool that only works under conditions that are never seen in the real world was irrelevant to real-world conditions.

  • I tried creating a web browser, and Google blocked me

    The browser I’m building, called Metastream, is an Electron-based (Chromium derived), MIT-licensed browser hosted on GitHub. Its main feature is the ability to playback videos on the web, synchronized with other peers. Each client runs its own instance of the Metastream browser and transmits playback information to keep them in sync—no audio or video content is sent.

    If someone is creating a browser that wants to playback media, they’ll soon discover the requirement of DRM for larger web media services such as Netflix and Hulu. There are a few DRM providers for the web including Widevine, PlayReady, and FairPlay.

GNUnet 0.11.1 released

Filed under
GNU
Web

We are pleased to announce the release of GNUnet 0.11.1.

This is a bugfix release for 0.11.0, mostly fixing minor bugs, improving documentation and fixing various build issues. In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny (about 200 peers) and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.11.1 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance.

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Android Leftovers

Heroku Review apps available for Treeherder

In bug 1566207 I added support for Heroku Review Apps (link to official docs). This feature allows creating a full Treeherder deployment (backend, frontend and data ingestion pipeline) for a pull request. This gives Treeherder engineers the ability to have their own deployment without having to compete over the Treeherder prototype app (a shared deployment). This is important as the number of engineers and contributors increases. Once created you get a complete Heroku environment with add-ons and workers configured and the deployment for it. Looking back, there are few new features that came out of the work, however, Heroku Review apps are not used as widely as I would have hoped for. Read more

Linux-driven RISC-V core to debut on an NXP i.MX SoC

The OpenHW Group unveiled a Linux-driven “CORE-V Chassis” eval SoC due for tape-out in 2H 2020 based on an NXP i.MX SoC, but featuring its RISC-V-and PULP-based 64-bit, 1.5GHz CV64A CPU and 32-bit CV32E cores. Meanwhile, Think Silicon demonstrated a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU. A not-for-profit, open source RISC-V initiative called the OpenHW Group that launched in June has announced that it plans to tape out a Linux-friendly CORE-V Chassis evaluation SoC in the second half of 2020 built around its 64-bit CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E coprocessor. The RISC-V based cores will be integrated into an undefined, NXP i.MX heterogeneous, multi-core SoC design. The SoC was announced at this week’s RISC-V Summit in San Jose, Calif., where Think Silicon also demo’d an early version of a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU (see farther below). The open source CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E are based on RISC-V architecture PULP Platform cores developed by the University of ETH Zurich. The 64-bit CV64A core is based on ETH Zurich’s Ariane implementation of its RV64GC RISC-V core IP. RV64GC is also used by many other RISC-V projects, including SiFive’s U54. Read more

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