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Chromium and Chrome

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chromium Rolls Out Enhanced GTK3 Theme Support

    Chromium is sporting greater GTK3 support in its latest daily development snapshots. Developers have begun building the browser with proper GTK3 theme integration enabled by default. I know: hardly ground breaking, but as Chromium (and its more popular sibling, Google Chrome) are widely used by Ubuntu users, it’s a change worth a note.

  • Chrome 58 Beta: IndexedDB 2.0, an improvement to iframe navigation, and immersive full screen for PWAs

    The IndexedDB 2.0 standard is now fully supported in Chrome, making it simpler to work with large data sets in the browser. IDB 2.0 features new schema management, bulk action methods, and more standardized handling of failures.

  • Chrome 58 Beta Supports IndexedDB 2.0, New Developer Features

    Google developers are busy today not only with the Android O Developer Preview but the Chrome team has delivered the first public beta for the upcoming Chrome 58.0.

    The Chrome 58 beta adds full support for IndexedDB 2.0, improvements to iframe navigation by adding a new sandbox keyword to control iframe top navigation behavior, immersive full-screen support for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and various other developer changes.

Chrome and Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Tor Browser 6.5 Gets First Point Release to Support Tor 0.2.9.10, OpenSSL 1.0.2k

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Tor Project announced the immediate availability of the first point release of the Tor Browser 6.5 stable branch of the open-source, Firefox-based anonymity web browser with enhanced security and privacy features based on Tor.

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Microsoft’s browsers are shedding users, new Firefox for Ubuntu, Firefox axes Windows XP support

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Node.js Coverage

Filed under
Development
Web
  • Node.js: A project for casual contributors

    I sat down at the Open Source Leadership Summit to record a podcast with Mikeal Rogers, who heads the Node.js Foundation, a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation. He observed that one of the characteristics of Node.js and its community is that it's a "post-GitHub platform," meaning "the first release of Node.js and the first code written on Node.js were in a GitHub repository. That's the environment we live in, so we had to come up with some newer ways of managing the project that are unique to this newer and more modern open source."

  • Tune Up Your Code with the Crankshaft Compiler

    Safia Abdalla is an open source developer and a maintainer on a project called nteract, but her pet topic is compilers. And, in her talk at Node.js Interactive, Abdalla explained the inner workings of the V8 compiler and how it can optimize the code it gets fed. Although Abdalla specifically focused on what goes on in the V8 compiler, she noted that there are many similarities to other compilers.

What's the fastest Linux web browser?

Filed under
Linux
Web

Firefox is easily the most popular Linux web browser. In the recent LinuxQuestions survey, Firefox took first place with 51.7 percent of the vote. Chrome came in second with a mere 15.67 percent. The other browsers all had, at most, scores in single percentages. But is Firefox really the fastest browser? I put them them to the test, and here's what I found.

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Open source web servers | NGINX, Apache, Lighttpd and more

Filed under
OSS
Web

Web servers have come a long way since the CERN httpd was developed by Tim Berners-Lee in 1990 as part of the same project that resulted in the first ever web browser.

Some of the leading suppliers of web servers today provide closed source enterprise-level options for enterprises, but many others retain the open values embodied by Tim Berners-Lee and the decision to release the source code for CERN httpd into the public domain in 1993.

Computerworld UK looks at the best open source web servers currently available for enterprises.

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OpenSUSE Web Site Cracked, Tumbleweed Update

Filed under
Security
Web
SUSE

Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser to Introduce a Powerful "Clear Personal Data" Dialog

Filed under
GNOME
Web

The development of the Epiphany 3.24 web browser continues for the upcoming GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, due for release on March 22, 2017, and a new preview release is now available for public testing.

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WordPress Addons

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • 8 Essential WordPress Plugins Your Website Must Have

    WordPress, what a CMS right? So many available plugins, themes, and tutorials. More than 27% of world websites are powered by a WordPress CMS. A staggering statistic which kinda indicates the level of functionality and flexibility it offers to webmasters. A complete website solution with an easy-to-use aura surrounding it.

    Chances are that while you are reading this another WordPress website has been launched into the vast ocean of information we call the Internet. Hell, you’ve probably reached this article by researching about WordPress after hearing that Joe from high school is making tons of money with his WordPress sites.

  • WordPress Updates in CentOS 7 + Apache + SELinux

    A couple of weeks ago I moved my WordPress blogs from a trivial shared hosting to a more sophisticated VPS running CentOS 7 since I was in search of more flexibility from my server.

    During these days, I learned a lot about managing a web server on my own and I’m still currently learning a ton of interesting things about this topic.

    One of the most annoying problems I faced a couple of days ago concerned, in particular, my WordPress installation. Everytime I was trying to update its core and plugins, the dashboard showed me a message similar to this...

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.