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WWW: Chrome 61 Beta and WebAssembly Working Group

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome 61 Beta: JavaScript modules, Payment Request API on desktop, Web Share API, and WebUSB

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 61 Beta Rolls Out With JavaScript Modules, WebUSB Support

    Google today is shipping the beta version of the upcoming Chrome 61 web-browser release.

    Highlights of Chrome 61 Beta include native support for JavaScript modules, Payment Request API support in the desktop browser, support for the Web Share API for easily sharing content on social networks, and initial WebUSB support.

  • Launching the WebAssembly Working Group

    For over two years the WebAssembly W3C Community Group has served as a forum for browser vendors and others to come together to develop an elegant and efficient compilation target for the Web. A first version is available in 4 browser engines and is on track to become a standard part of the Web. We’ve had several successful in-person CG meetings, while continuing our robust online collaboration on github. We also look forward to engaging the wider W3C community at the WebAssembly meeting at this year’s TPAC.

Mozilla Firefox 55 Web Browser Is Now Available to Download, Here's What's New

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

It's not yet official, but the Firefox 55.0 open-source and cross-platform web browser is now available for download on GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

Read more

Browsers: Chrome/Chromium and Mozilla's Firefox, Send

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome/Chromium Turns On Support For OpenType Variable Fonts

    Google's Chrome/Chromium web-browser has now enabled support by default for OpenType Variable Fonts.

  • The latest challenge to Google's AI dominance comes from an unlikely place -- Firefox

    Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox internet browser, has begun testing a feature that lets you enter a search query using your voice instead of typing it in. The move could help Mozilla's efforts to make Firefox more competitive with Google Chrome.

    If you're using Firefox in English on Mac, Windows or Linux, you can turn on the experimental "Voice Fill" feature and then use it on Google, Yahoo and DuckDuckGo. Support for other websites will come later.

    Alphabet's Google offers speech recognition on its search engine when accessed through Chrome on desktop -- it became available in 2013 -- and Yahoo, Microsoft's Bing and Google all let you run search queries with your voice on mobile devices. But searching with your voice on Google while using Firefox on the desktop, for example, has historically been impossible. Now Mozilla wants to make its desktop browser more competitive.

  • Fedora 26 - Firefox Test Pilot send large files.

    This tool from Firefox team let you to send you upload and encrypt large files (up to 1GB) to share online.

Mozilla Advocacy, New Test Pilot Experiments

Filed under
Web
  • Mozilla releases research results: Zero rating is not serving as an on-ramp to the internet

    Today, 4 billion people live without the internet. There’s a global debate about how to connect the unconnected, but it’s often dominated by assumptions and not a lot of data or talking to actual users on the ground.

    To better inform this issue, Mozilla recently supported a series of focus groups to investigate how and why people use subsidized services in India, Myanmar, Peru, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda and South Africa. Today, we’re releasing the results of this research carried out by Research ICT Africa, LIRNEasia and IEP.

  • New Test Pilot Experiments Available Today

    Last month, we delivered the first in a series of groundbreaking updates to the browser. This week, the Test Pilot team is continuing to evolve Firefox features with three new experiences that will make for a simpler, faster and safer experience.

Google Chrome 60 Released

Filed under
Google
Web

DRM-Carrying Flash's Death in the News

Filed under
Web
  • Google: HTML is Faster, Safer, and More Power Efficient Than Adobe's Flash

    After Adobe's big announcement this morning that they plan to end support for Flash in late 2020, Google Chrome's Anthony Laforge published a blog article asking Flash developers to start transitioning to HTML.

    For a long time, Google shipped its Chrome web browser built-in with Flash support, but it now looks like Chrome will slowly start blocking Flash content, require explicit permission from users, until upstream support is terminated three years from now, at the end of 2020. Google, like anyone else on this planet, believe HTML is faster, safer, and more power efficient than Flash, without a doubt.

  • Adobe Flash will die by 2020, Adobe and browser makers say

     

    For many, though, Flash was simply seen at least as a nuisance, and at worst a serious security risk. 
     

     

    Flash-based exploits have circulated for years, in a game of cat-and-mouse between hackers and Adobe itself. Apple's Steve Jobs famously banned Flash from the iPhone, claiming that Flash hurt battery life and also was a security risk. [...]

  • Adobe Flash is dead (well, nearly)

     

    Tech firms have long been hammering nail's into its coffin, too, and back in 2010, Steve Jobs famously penned a letter that called for the demise of Adobe Flash in favour of a shift to open web standards.

  • The end of Flash

IoT Framework for Edge Computing Gains Ground

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Web

In April, The Linux Foundation launched the open source EdgeX Foundry project to develop a standardized interoperability framework for Internet of Things (IoT) edge computing. Recently, EdgeX Foundry announced eight new members, bringing the total membership to 58.

The new members are Absolute, IoT Impact LABS, inwinSTACK, Parallel Machines, Queen’s University Belfast, RIOT, Toshiba Digital Solutions Corporation, and Tulip Interfaces. They join a roster that includes AMD, Analog Devices, Canonical/Ubuntu, Cloud Foundry, Dell, Linaro, Mocana, NetFoundry, Opto 22, RFMicron, and VMWare, among others.

EdgeX Foundry is built around Dell’s early stage, Apache 2.0 licensed FUSE IoT middleware framework, which offers more than a dozen microservices comprising over 125,000 lines of code. The Linux Foundation worked with Dell to launch the EdgeX Foundry after the FUSE project merged with a similar AllJoyn-compliant IoTX project led by current EdgeX members Two Bulls and Beechwood.

Read more

Also: Tizen Experts Weekly News Recap – 23th July 2017

Android: NXP i.MX6 on Etnaviv Update

W3C and DRM, Net Neutrality Debate

Filed under
Web
  • W3C just fragmented the open internet with DRM - here's how we can fix it

    Last week, on the 6th of July, Tim Burners Lee approved the proposal for DRM in open web. He approved EME (Encrypted Media Extensions); which endorses non-free extensions to be built into the modern web so that HollyWood's content can be watched without challenging their view of technology.

  • We Must Keep the Internet Free and Open. EFF, Tech Giants, Startups and Internet Users Tell FCC: Don’t Sell Out Net Neutrality To Appease ISPs

    AirBnB, Amazon, ACLU, Google, Etsy, Y Combinator Among Organizations Standing Up To Government Plan To Let ISPs Block Content, Charge Fees for ‘Fast Lanes’

    San Francisco—The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and a broad coalition of user advocacy groups and major technology companies and organizations joined forces today to protest the FCC’s plan to toss out net neutrality rules that preserve Internet freedom and prevent cable and telecommunications companies from controlling what we can see and do online.

    Without net neutrality, Internet service providers (ISPs) can block your favorite content, throttle or slow down Internet speeds to disadvantage competitors’ content, or make you pay more than you already do to access movies and other online entertainment.

  • The mere existence of the Net Neutrality debate is a symptom of a much, much deeper rabbit hole

    The problem is that politicians in the United States and some other places are giving communications monopolies and tax breaks to entrenched legacy industries – telco and cable – which have an enormous strategic incentive to prevent the Internet from ever reaching its potential, but pretend to embrace it.

EFF Appeals EME Travesty, Slackware Developer Weighs In

Filed under
Slack
Web
  • Encrypted Media Extensions on the World Wide Web

    Before I continue, I want you to fully realize that with Slackware Linux, your rights are not taken away. You are free to use – or not use – technologies that allow you to watch “protected” content like Netflix videos. Our browsers will work just as well if you choose not to use DRM technologies. The libraries which implement the DRM layer are separate from the Slackware packages containing the browsers (Firefox, Chromium) and are not distributed with the OS. It is up to you to add DRM extensions if you need them. You are and remain in control of your OS.

  • [Older] Amid Unprecedented Controversy, W3C Greenlights DRM for the Web [Ed: see "I know this isn't specifically Linux related, but I'm shocked we're not talking about this already."]
  • EFF has appealed the W3C's decision to make DRM for the web without protections

    Five days ago, the World Wide Web Consortium announced that it would go ahead with its project of making DRM for web-video, and that the Director, Tim Berners-Lee had overruled or decided not to act further on all objections about the dangers this posed to legitimate and important activities including security audits, accessibility adaptation and competition.

    The W3C has an appeals process, which has never been successfully used in W3C history. If 5 percent of the members appeal a decision by the Director, all members are entitled to vote, and if there's a majority in favor of overulling the Director, the decision is unmade.

  • Global Web standard for integrating DRM into browsers hits a snag

    Days ago, Ars reported on a controversial decision by the industry trade group that oversees the global development of Web standards. The decision by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to back a standard for implementing digital rights management (DRM) for Web-based content is now under appeal, the Electronic Frontier Foundation announced Wednesday.

Net Neutrality Protest Today

Filed under
Web
  • AT&T is joining tomorrow’s net neutrality protest, but it hates the FCC’s net neutrality rules

    AT&T is hardly a fan of net neutrality, at least as most people understand it. The company has been accused by the FCC of violating open internet protections, and has forcefully lobbied against the current rules. It’s even joined in lawsuits to block them.

  • AT&T joins net neutrality protest—despite suing to block neutrality rules

    AT&T says it is joining a big protest to save net neutrality—even though the company previously sued the US Federal Communications Commission in a failed attempt to get the commission's rules thrown out.

    "Tomorrow, AT&T will join the 'Day of Action' for preserving and advancing an open Internet," AT&T Senior Executive VP Bob Quinn wrote in a blog post this afternoon.

  • AT&T Pretends To Love Net Neutrality, Joins Tomorrow's Protest With A Straight Face

    You'd be hard pressed to find a bigger enemy of net neutrality than the fine folks at AT&T. The company has a history of all manner of anti-competitive assaults on the open and competitive internet, from blocking customer access to Apple FaceTime unless users subscribed to more expensive plans, to exempting its own content from arbitrary and unnecessary usage caps while penalizing streaming competitors. AT&T also played a starring role in ensuring the FCC's 2010 net neutrality rules were flimsy garbage, and sued to overturn the agency's tougher, 2015 rules.

  • Telecom Industry Feebly Tries To Deflate Net Neutrality Protest With Its Own, Lame 'Unlock The Net' Think Tank Campaign

    With this week's net neutrality protests being joined by the likes of Google, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Reddit and hundreds of startups and small companies, the cable and broadcast industry appears to be getting a little nervous. So far they've had a relatively easy time convincing FCC boss Ajit Pai to not only dismantle the rules, but to blatantly ignore the massive public support the rules enjoy. Pai's even turned a blind eye as somebody used a bot to stuff the agency's public comment system with bogus support for the telecom industry's horrible idea.

  • The FCC Insists It Can't Stop Impostors From Lying About My Views On Net Neutrality

    So we've been talking for months now about how the Trump FCC has quite intentionally turned a blind eye to fraudulent comments being posted to the agency's net neutrality proceeding, since the lion's share of these bogus comments support the agency's plan to gut the popular consumer protections. Numerous people say they've had their identities lifted by somebody that has used a bot to populate the agency's comment system with hundreds-of-thousands of fake comments supporting the telecom-industry backed effort. Calls by these folks (and a few Senators) for an investigation have been simply ignored.

  • Defending Net Neutrality: A Day of Action

    As always, Mozilla is standing up for net neutrality.

    And today, we’re not alone. Hundreds of organizations — from the ACLU and GitHub to Amazon and Fight for the Future — are participating in a Day of Action, voicing loud support for net neutrality and a healthy internet.

    “Mozilla is supporting the majority of Americans who believe the web belongs to individual users, without interference from ISP gatekeepers,” says Ashley Boyd, Mozilla’s VP of Advocacy. “On this Day of Action, we’re amplifying what millions of Americans have been saying for years: Net neutrality is crucial to a free, open internet.”

  • Net neutrality protests to blanket internet

     

    Major technology companies and tech advocacy organizations are banding together in a last-ditch effort to save the Federal Communication Commission’s net neutrality rules.

  • Join Us in the Fight for Net Neutrality

     

    Automattic strongly believes in a free and open Internet and it’s hard to imagine a truly open Internet without Net Neutrality.

  • The Who's Who of Net Neutrality's 'Day of Action'

     

    Here's where seven internet giants stand on the issue, and what a world with fast and slow lanes might mean for them.

  • Net Neutrality: The July 12 Internet-Wide Day of Action protest and what to expect

     

    Who will come together for the protest: More than 180 companies including Amazon, Twitter, Etsy, OkCupid, and Vimeo, along with advocacy groups such as the ACLU, Change.org, and Greenpeace, will join the protest and urge their users and followers to do the same.  

  • Why the 12 July protest to protect net neutrality matters

     

    What can people do? Tell the FCC and Congress to protect the open web through BattleForTheNet.com, or through one of the widgets on many popular websites on Wednesday.

  • Ars Technica supports net neutrality

    To explain how the current rules work, Ars Senior IT Reporter Jon Brodkin today takes us on a deep-dive into net neutrality and the current "Title II authority" behind the rules. If FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, appointed by President Donald Trump, revokes the rules, as he says he will, "Title II provisions related to broadband network construction, universal service, competition, network interconnection, and Internet access for disabled people would no longer apply."

  • If You Want To Protect The Internet, Look To Congress

    As you probably know (because it's almost unavoidable across the web), today is the "Day of Action" on behalf of net neutrality. Tons of other sites are participating in various ways. Many are popping up widgets, warning you of how crappy the internet might become if broadband access providers were allowed to create the kind of internet they dream of -- one in which they are the gatekeepers, and where they get to put tollbooths on services trying to reach you. But you already know about all that, because you already read Techdirt, and we've been talking about this for over a decade. Many sites are encouraging you to comment on the FCC's proceedings -- which you absolutely should do (even as the FCC itself is making a mockery of the commenting process, by allowing bogus and fraudulent comments in. 

    [...]

     Second: while you absolutely should go and file FCC comments (and I highly recommend first reading this guide to filing impactful FCC comments from a former top FCC staffer), this fight is going to end with Congress one way or the other. Two months ago we wrote about the real game plan to destroy net neutrality, and you can see it playing out in realtime. Ajit Pai's move to get the FCC to repeal the rules is an effort to force the hand of Congress, and make it come in and create new regulations. Indeed, if you look around, it's not hard to find lots of opeds from telco-funded folks about how "Congress should solve this" (all of which pretend to support net neutrality). And, yes, this is the kind of thing that Congress should solve -- if we trusted Congress to actually do what was in the interest of the public, rather than the interests of the broadband access providers. But, right now, you shouldn't. After all, this is the same Congress that happily voted to kill broadband privacy rules, and then seemed shocked that this upset people.

  • How to write a meaningful FCC comment supporting net neutrality

    Gigi Sohn was a top counselor to former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler when the commission reclassified ISPs as common carriers and imposed net neutrality rules against blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. Yesterday, she published a post on Mashable titled "4 steps to writing an impactful net neutrality comment (which you should do)." Even if the FCC repeals net neutrality rules, meaningful comments could help net neutrality advocates argue in a future court case that the rules should be reinstated, she wrote.

    Before joining the FCC, Sohn was president and co-founder of the advocacy group Public Knowledge, which still plays an active role supporting net neutrality rules and other consumer protection regulations. She left the FCC after the election of President Donald Trump and took fellowship positions with Georgetown Law's Institute for Technology Law & Policy, Open Society Foundations, and Mozilla.

  • If FCC gets its way, we’ll lose a lot more than net neutrality

    The Republican-led Federal Communications Commission is preparing to overturn the two-year-old decision that invoked the FCC's Title II authority in order to impose net neutrality rules. It's possible the FCC could replace today's net neutrality rules with a weaker version, or it could decide to scrap net neutrality rules altogether.

    Either way, what's almost certain is that the FCC will eliminate the Title II classification of Internet service providers. And that would have important effects on consumer protection that go beyond the core net neutrality rules that outlaw blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization. Without Title II's common carrier regulation, the FCC would have less authority to oversee the practices of Internet providers like Comcast, Charter, AT&T, and Verizon. Customers and websites harmed by ISPs would also have fewer recourses, both in front of the FCC and in courts of law.

    Title II provisions related to broadband network construction, universal service, competition, network interconnection, and Internet access for disabled people would no longer apply. Rules requiring disclosure of hidden fees and data caps could be overturned, and the FCC would relinquish its role in evaluating whether ISPs can charge competitors for data cap exemptions.

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Oracle's Exadata (GNU/Linux-powered) and VirtualBox 5.2 Beta

  • Oracle Brings Bare Metal Exadata Performance to the Cloud
    Oracle's Exadata Cloud Service price list for non-metered services currently starts at a list price of $55,000 a month. For that price, organizations get the Oracle Database Exadata Cloud Service with a quarter-rack bare-metal Exadata X6 system.
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The future of Python and when not to use a regex

  • The future of Python: Concurrency devoured, Node.js next on menu
    The PyBay 2017 conference, held in San Francisco over the weekend, began with a keynote about concurrency. Though hardly a draw for a general interest audience, the topic – an examination of multithreaded and multiprocess programming techniques – turns out to be central to the future of Python. Since 2008, the Python community has tried to reconcile incompatibility between Python 2 and newly introduced Python 3. For years, adoption of Python 3 was slow and some even dared to suggest Python didn't have a future. As late as last year, Zed Shaw, an accomplished developer and author of the popular Learn Python the Hard Way, even ventured to opine, "There is a high probability that Python 3 is such a failure it will kill Python." Despite these unsubstantiated odds, Shaw – a polarizing figure for some Pythonistas – this year released a version of his book for Python 3.
  • When not to use a regex
     

    A regex is useful for validating simple patterns and for finding patterns in text. For anything beyond that it’s almost certainly a terrible choice.

Linux: Cloud Foundry, HMM, AMD Radeon and NVIDIA

  • Navigating Cloud Foundry
    This open source platform-as-a-service cloud platform bridges the gap between legacy applications and cloud services. For all the talk about the cloud, many applications continue to run on traditional servers. Hybrid architectures are sometimes the right option, but if you want to move corporate applications onto the Internet, you don’t want to start from scratch. Cloud Foundry, a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) cloud platform, enables enterprises to move older software to the cloud and build new cloud-centric programs using familiar tools and programming languages.
  • HMM Revised Its 25th Time, Seeking Inclusion In Linux 4.14
    Jerome Glisse of Red Hat has published his 25th revision to the Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM) patch series. HMM is about allowing a process address space to be mirrored and for system memory to be transparently used by any device process. With HMM v25, there are more code comments and documentations, fixes to the code, merging the HMM-CDM patches into this patch series, and other improvements.
  • Radeon X.Org Driver Gets Fixed Up To Always Allow Page-Flipping With TearFree
    It's fairly rare these days seeing improvements to the xf86-video-ati DDX: the driver for those running a pre-AMDGPU (GCN 1.2) graphics card with this driver paired with Radeon DRM and not using the generic xf86-video-modesetting driver instead. But if you are using xf86-video-ati and use the "TearFree" feature to try to avoid screen tearing, a number of patches landed today. Michel Dänzer of AMD landed a handful of patches to the xf86-video-ati Git repository today for the Radeon DDX. Notably the patches make for always allowing DRI2 page-flipping to be used with TearFree and the same goes for DRI Present page-flipping with the TearFree option. Long story short, page-flipping should now always work in the TearFree mode.
  • NVIDIA Releases Vulkan 381.26.13 Beta Linux Driver
    NVIDIA's driver team has today released new Vulkan beta drivers for both Windows and Linux. The new NVIDIA Linux Vulkan beta is versioned at 381.26.13, so still not yet re-based to the current 384 series, but these changes should end up being merged for their next feature series to mainline.

Krita 3.2.0 Released

  • Krita 3.2.0 Released
    Later than planned, here’s Krita 3.2.0! With the new G’Mic-qt plugin integration, the smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets and a lot of bug fixes. Read the full release notes for more information!. Here’s GDQuest’s video introducing 3.2.0:
  • Krita 3.2 Released For Leading Open-Source Digital Painting
    The Krita project has today announced version 3.2 is ready of their open-source, cross-platform digital painting program. Krita 3.2 features new G'Mic-qt plugin integration, a smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets, a variety of fixes, and other minor improvements.