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Browsers: Mozilla Firefox and Bromite

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Firefox 60 Product Integrity Requests Report

    Late last year I was putting out weekly reports on the number of requests Mozilla’s Product Integrity group was receiving and how well we were tracking toward our self-imposed service-level agreement (respond to 90% within 48 hours).

    The initial system we set up was only ever intended to be minimally viable and has not scaled well, although that’s probably to be expected. There’s been quite a lot of growing pains so I’ve been tasked with taking it to the next level.

  • Tab Warming: How Firefox Will Improve Web Browsing Experience? How To Get It Now?

    Mozilla developer Mike Conley described the details about Tab Warming in a post on his personal blog. It will improve tab switching by pre-loading the contents of a tab before it gets displayed in front of the users.

  • Bromite Is the New NoChromo — Open Source Chrome Port with Ad Blocking

    A while back, we told you about NoChromo, a no-root ad-blocking browser based on Google Chrome's open source code base, Chromium. That browser was wildly successful, as it offered an identical interface to regular Chrome, but without any ads. Sadly, the developer abandoned NoChromo, but a new ad-blocking Chromium port called Bromite has been released to fill its void.

Private Internet Access creator, London Trust Media, acquires Linux Journal

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

Over the years, with your help, we have supported many worthy projects and events in the open source space. At the beginning of December, Carlie Fairchild posted a farewell to the Linux community in a post titled “Linux Journal Ceases Publication.” We know that some of our users may have also read this message, given the strong overlap between those that care about privacy and those that care about freedom and open source software. Needless to say, upon reading the news, we immediately reached out to see how we could help.

Many members of our team have been Linux Journal readers for years – even since before they worked with Private Internet Access. We truly believe that Linux Journal needs to be there to chronicle our journey into a more open future. Private Internet Access is proud to announce that our parent company, LTM, has acquired Linux Journal. 2018 is going to be a big year for Linux – and we will continue to play our part in facilitating this.

Read more

Also: Happy New Year- Welcome to Linux Journal 2.0!

More on Chrome 63

Filed under
Google
Software
Web

New Chrome Browser and End of Chrome Web Store

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome 63 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux w/ Flags redesign, Site Certificate shortcut

    Chrome 63 is rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux today with an assortment of developer-focused features and security fixes. The biggest additions in this desktop release are a redesigned chrome://flags page and a tweaked permissions dropdown.

  • Chrome Apps are dead, as Google shuts down the Chrome Web Store section

    More than a year ago, Google announced that Chrome Apps would be removed from Windows, Mac, and Linux versions of Chrome (but not Chrome OS) some time in 2017, and it seems we've come to that point today. Google has shut down the "app" section of the Chrome Web Store for those platforms, meaning you can't install Chrome Apps anymore. Google has started sending out emails to Chrome app developers telling them that Chrome Apps are deprecated, and while previously installed apps still work, the functionality will be stripped out of Chrome in Q1 2018.

Opera-Inspired Otter and Vivaldi

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Otter RC3 Released As The Browser Inspired By Opera 12 & Implemented Using Qt5

    At the end of 2013 we wrote about a new Qt5 web-browser inspired by Opera and in 2014 it entered alpha form. But since then we hadn't heard much of that browser, Otter, until a Phoronix reader brought it up in our forums today.

    It turns out that the Otter web browser is nearing its hard feature freeze for their first major release and the latest release candidate was made available this week. The goal of Otter remains to "recreate the best aspects of the classic Opera (12.x)" while making use of the Qt5 tool-kit and offering packages for Windows, macOS, and Linux (including AppImage support).

  • Raspberry Pi, Linux on Arm users: Now you get a new browser option with Vivaldi

    Raspberry Pi users now have one more browser to choose from besides Chromium, Firefox and Midori, with the newly announced availability of an experimental version of power-user focused Vivaldi.

    The Blink-based browser from former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner is expanding beyond Windows, macOS and Linux PCs to a range of Arm-based developer boards, including the Raspberry Pi, CubieBoard, Asus Tinker Board, and more.

    Vivaldi doesn't yet have a mobile browser but it was its work on one that helped spawn the build for Raspberry Pi, according to the company. It also points to Samsung's DeX project as a potential new platform for Vivaldi. DeX aims to run full Linux on a Galaxy phone connected to a display.

Recommended Privacy Tools (Apps, Add-Ons, Search Engines) for Ubuntu Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Web
HowTos

This is an user-friendly list of tools to protect user's internet privacy for Ubuntu users. The tools including search engine (StartPagec.com), add-ons (HTTPS Everywhere, Disconnect), and programs (DNSCrypt Proxy, OpenVPN) that are easy for beginners to install on Ubuntu. This list introduces the importance of privacy for all of you (yes, please read PrivacyTools.io) and that protecting your privacy is not difficult. This list is kept short so you can learn one by one and exercise them on many computers you have. I wish this helps you a lot!

Read more

Mastodon is Free Software, But It Does Not Respect Free Speech

Filed under
OSS
Web

Mastodon was always known to be tough on Nazis; it was known that they were strict on free speech only to a degree. After the treatment that I received yesterday, however, I can no longer recommend Mastodon. It may be Free software, but it’s very weak on free speech.

Read more

The Fox Hunt - Firefox and friends compared

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

So what should you use? Well, it depends. You want extensions, the entire repertoire as it's meant to be? Go with Pale Moon, but be aware of the inconsistencies and problems down the road. However, another piece of penalty is less than optimal looks. If you are more focused on speed and future development, then it's Firefox, as it offers the most complete compromise. The add-ons will make it or break it. Waterfox makes less sense, because the margins of benefit are too small.

My take is - Firefox. It's not ideal, but Pale Moon does not solve the problem fully, it combines nostalgia with technicals, and that's a rough patch, even though the project is quite admirable in what it's trying to do. Alas, I'm afraid the old extensions will die, and the new ones won't be compatible, so the browser will be left stranded somewhere in between. But hopefully, this little comparison test gives you a better overview and understanding how things work.

Finally, we go back to the question of speed. We've seen how one flavor of Fox stacks against another, but what about Chrome? I will answer that in a follow-up article, which will compare Chrome to Vivaldi, again based on popular demand, and then we will also check how all these different browsers compare using my small, limited and entirely personal corner of the Web. Stay tuned.

Read more

Also: Firefox Private Browsing vs. Chrome Incognito: Which is Faster?

Tor Improvements and Bugfix

Filed under
Security
Web
  • Next-Gen Algorithms Make Tor Browser More Secure And Private, Download The Alpha Now

    Tor, the anonymity network was in need of an upgrade, as the world started raising concerns about its reliability. It was this year only when a hacker managed to take down almost 1/5th of the onion network.

    The possible applications of Tor have reached far ahead than calling it a grey market for drugs and other illegal things. It’s already actively used for the exchange of confidential information, file transfer, and cryptocurrency transactions with an expectation that nobody can track it.

  • TorMoil Vulnerability Leaks Real IP Address from Tor Browser Users

    The Tor Project has released a security update for the Tor Browser on Mac and Linux to fix a vulnerability that leaks users' real IP addresses.

    The vulnerability was spotted by Filippo Cavallarin, CEO of We Are Segment, an Italian company specialized in cyber-security and ethical hacking.

  • Critical Tor flaw leaks users’ real IP address—update now

    Mac and Linux versions of the Tor anonymity browser just received a temporary fix for a critical vulnerability that leaks users' IP addresses when they visit certain types of addresses.

    TorMoil, as the flaw has been dubbed by its discoverer, is triggered when users click on links that begin with file:// rather than the more common https:// and http:// address prefixes. When the Tor browser for macOS and Linux is in the process of opening such an address, "the operating system may directly connect to the remote host, bypassing Tor Browser," according to a brief blog post published Tuesday by We Are Segment, the security firm that privately reported the bug to Tor developers.

Chromium in Slackware, New Chrome Beta

Filed under
Google
Web
  • [Slackware] Chromium is now compiled using clang

    In my previous blog post about Chromium 62, I described the issues I had while attempting to compile it on Slackware14.2. The gcc compiler suite on Slackware 14.2 is “too old” for Chromium because it lacks the required C++11 support. More to the point, the Google developers use clang instead of gcc for their own compilations and therefore gcc support is becoming stale. Response by Google developers when they encounter a gcc-related bug report is to ‘please switch to clang’.

  • Google Pushes Chrome 63 Into Beta with Dynamic Module Imports, Device Memory API

    Google recently pushed the Chrome 63 web browser for beta testing for all supported platforms, giving us a heads up to what we should expect from this release when it hits stable next month.

    Google Chrome 63 now lives in the Beta channel pocket, and it can be installed on Chrome OS, Linux, Android, Mac, and Windows operating systems. It promises big changes for developers, including dynamic module imports, a new Device Memory API, permissions UI changes, as well as async generators and iterators.

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