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Ade Malsasa Akbar on CloudTube and Mailo

Filed under
Web
  • Let's Welcome CloudTube

    Do you remember Invidious Everywhere? Since early September Invidio.us is unfortunately officially closed and the Invidious web software development is now seeking for new maintainer. Thank you Omarroth for this incredibly good YouTube front end for your hard works help people and me truly a lot for these years. However, there is a good news, it is CloudTube now an alternative to Invidious so we can watch YouTube right in the web browser without being tracked nor running nonfree javascript.

  • Mailo Email Service for Internet Users

    Here is Mailo a new email service you can register to based in France, Europe. With Mailo your email address will be like malsasa@mailo.com. It promises ethical emails, offers free accounts, and gives imap feature with beautiful yet easy to use interface. What's so special about Mailo is it's friendly to everyone using Free Libre Open Source Software in general and everyone seeking privacy alternative to Gmail in particular. It is featured in Free Software Foundation's Webmail Systems page. For you who are looking for secure email other than Disroot or Tutanota, Mailo is very promising. By this article I wish our readers try and give us comments about it.

10 Open Source Static Site Generators to Create Fast and Resource-Friendly Websites

Filed under
OSS
Web

Technically, a static website means the webpages are not generated on the server dynamically. The HTML, CSS, JavaScript lie on the server in the version the end user receives it. The raw source code files are already prebuilt, the source code doesn’t change with the next server request.

It’s FOSS is a dynamic website which depends on several databases and the web pages are generated and served when there’s a request from your browser. Majority of the web is powered by dynamic sites where you interact with the websites and there are plenty of content that often change.

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Web Browsing: Mozilla Firefox, Project Maelstrom and FreeTube on PCLinuxOS

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Firefox usage is down 85% despite Mozilla's top exec pay going up 400%

    One of the most popular and most intuitive ways to evaluate an NGO is to judge how much of their spending is on their programme of works (or "mission") and how much is on other things, like administration and fundraising. If you give money to a charity for feeding people in the third world you hope that most of the money you give them goes on food - and not, for example, on company cars for head office staff.

    Mozilla looks bad when considered in this light. Fully 30% of all expenditure goes on administration. Charity Navigator, an organisation that measures NGO effectiveness, would give them zero out of ten on the relevant metric. For context, to achieve 5/10 on that measure Mozilla admin would need to be under 25% of spending and, for 10/10, under 15%.

  • This is a pretty dire assessment of Mozilla

    Back to Mozilla -- in my humble but correct opinion, Mozilla should be doing two things and two things only:

    1. Building THE reference implementation web browser, and

    2. Being a jugular-snapping attack dog on standards committees.

    3. There is no 3.

  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 81 on POWER

    Firefox 81 is released. In addition to new themes of dubious colour coordination, media controls now move to keyboards and supported headsets, the built-in JavaScript PDF viewer now supports forms (if we ever get a JIT going this will work a lot better), and there are relatively few developer-relevant changes.

    This release heralds the first official change in our standard POWER9 .mozconfig since Fx67. Link-time optimization continues to work well (and in 81 the LTO-enhanced build I'm using now benches about 6% faster than standard -O3 -mcpu=power9), so I'm now making it a standard part of my regular builds with a minor tweak we have to make due to bug 1644409. Build time still about doubles on this dual-8 Talos II and it peaks out at almost 84% of its 64GB RAM during LTO, but the result is worth it.

  • What happened to BitTorrent’s Project Maelstrom web browser?

    In April 2015, BitTorrent Inc. announced the public beta of Project Maelstrom; its new experimental peer-to-peer web browser. The browser reimagined the web using the company’s name sake file-sharing protocol. Websites would be distributed equally by its visitors instead of being hosted by an expensive central webserver. The company published a beta and some blog posts, but then never mentioned Project Maelstrom again. What happened to it?

    Project Maelstrom was launched four years after Opera had launched Opera Unite (Project Alien). Unite gave everyone their own web server built right into its web browser. It enabled anyone to host a website, share photos, and do all sorts of web things like music streaming directly from their own computer. Unite failed to account for people wanting to shut their computers — now servers — off at the end of the day, however.

    BitTorrent’s Project Maelstrom sought to fix this limitation by making everyone who visited a website help contribute to its distribution! As long as someone else was hosting a copy of it, you could shut down your computer for the night without taking your website offline with it.

  • Freetube 0.7.3 added to repository

    FreeTube is a YouTube client built around using YouTube more privately. You can enjoy your favorite content and creators without your habits being tracked. All of your user data is stored locally and never sent or published to the internet. Being powered by the Invidious API, FreeTube has become one of the best methods to watch YouTube privately on the desktop.

Mozilla: Firefox, Hubs and SeaMonkey

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

  • 81.0 Firefox Release
  • Firefox 81 Released With Security Fixes, PDF Viewer Enhancements

    Firefox 81 is out this morning as the newest monthly update to the Mozilla web browser.

    Firefox 81.0 brings the ability for keyboard/headset-based controls for audio/video playback in the browser, various accessibility fixes for HTML5 audio/video controls, Picture-in-Picture mode is now more accessible with icon improvements, and other video work. It also looks like a few VA-API fixes made it into this version too after the big push in Firefox 80.

  • Your Privacy and Mozilla Hubs

    At Mozilla, we believe that privacy is fundamental to a healthy internet.

    [...]

    There’s a certain amount of information that we have to process in order to provide you with the Hubs experience. For example, we receive and send to others the name and likeness of your avatar, its position in the room, and your interactions with objects in the room. If you create an account, you can store custom avatars and their names.

    We receive data about the virtual objects and avatars in a room in order to share that data with others in the room, but we don’t monitor the individual objects that are posted in a room. Users have the ability to permanently pin objects to a room, which will store them in the room until they’re deleted. Unpinned files are deleted from Mozilla’s servers after 72 hours.

    We do collect basic metrics about how many rooms are being created and how many users are in those rooms, but we don’t tie that data to specific rooms or users. What we don’t do is collect or store any data without the user's explicit consent.

    [...]

    We will never perform user monitoring or deep tracking, particularly using VR data sources like gaze-tracking. We will continue to minimize the personal data we collect, and when we do need to collect data, we will invest in privacy preserving solutions like differential privacy.

  • [PCLinuxOS] Seamonkey updated to 2.53.4

    SeaMonkey is a free and open-source Internet suite. It is the continuation of the former Mozilla Application Suite, based on the same source code, which itself grew out of Netscape Communicator and formed the base of Netscape 6 and Netscape 7.

Now and Then: The Fate of 7 Promising Free Linux Web Browsers

Filed under
Linux
Web

This is illustrated by the image to the left which depicts the web browser share for visits to LinuxLinks.com for the period covering June – September 2020.

But Chrome and Firefox are not for everyone. Chrome is proprietary software so it’s not very appealing to open source enthusiasts. There’s the open source Chromium, of course, but that’s not very popular. And Firefox has been steadily losing market share.

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TenFourFox FPR27 available

Filed under
Mac
Moz/FF
Web

TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 27 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). Unfortunately, I have thus far been unable to solve issue 621 regarding the crashes on LinkedIn, so to avoid drive-by crashes, scripts are now globally disabled on LinkedIn until I can (no loss since it doesn't work anyway). If you need them on for some reason, create a pref tenfourfox.troublesome-js.allow and set it to true. I will keep working on this for FPR28 to see if I can at least come up with a better wallpaper, though keep in mind that even if I repair the crash it may still not actually work anyway. There are otherwise no new changes since the beta except for outstanding security updates, and it will go live Monday evening Pacific assuming no new issues.

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5 Linux VPN Providers To Secure your Connections With

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a communication tunnel between your devices and remote connection servers to bypass your local ISP censorship and local network monitoring. The working concept is that you redirect all your Internet traffic via these tunnels to access the Internet rather than directly using your ISP, and in this way, ISPs ability to see your activities on the Internet will be greatly reduced.

[...]

There are many companies out there which provide VPN services, but if you are a Linux user then what you should be concerned with is what companies provide native clients for Linux? Because not all of them do so, so you have to make sure that the VPN provider supports Linux before subscribing for their service.

This, of course, is in addition to the privacy and security features provided by the VPN provider.

We’ll take you today in a tour on some Linux VPN providers, so that you can use them and increase your security and privacy online.

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Wasmer, TenFourFox FPR27b1 and Socorro/Firefox

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF
Web
  • Wasmer 1.0 Is Approaching For Running WebAssembly Anywhere

    The Wasmer 1.0 alpha release is now available for running WebAssembly programs anywhere. Wasmer is about providing a universal runtime for WebAssembly (WASM) that can run across platforms / operating systems and also embed into other programming languages. Wasmer leverages WebAssembly principles to provide safety around untrusted code on top of its other design features.

  • TenFourFox FPR27b1 available (now with sticky Reader View)

    The big user-facing update for FPR27 is a first pass at "sticky" Reader View. I've been paying attention more to improving TenFourFox's implementation of Reader View because, especially for low-end Power Macs (and there's an argument to be made that all Power Macs are, by modern standards, low end), rendering articles in Reader View strips out extraneous elements, trackers, ads, social media, comments, etc., making them substantially lighter and faster than "full fat." Also, because the layout is simplified, this means less chance for exposing or choking on layout or JavaScript features TenFourFox currently doesn't support. However, in regular Firefox and FPR26, you have to go to a page and wait for some portion of it to render before you enter Reader View, which is inconvenient, and worse still if you click any link in a Reader-rendered article you exit Reader View and have to manually repeat the process. This can waste a non-trivial amount of processing time.

    So when I say Reader View is now "sticky," that means links you click in an article in reader mode are also rendered in reader mode, and so on, until you explicitly exit it (then things go back to default). This loads pages much faster, in some cases nearly instantaneously. In addition, to make it easier to enter reader mode in fewer steps (and on slower systems, less time waiting for the reader icon in the address bar to be clickable), you can now right click on links and automatically pop the link into Reader View in a new tab ("Open Link in New Tab, Enter Reader View").

  • Socorro Engineering: Half in Review 2020 h1

    2020h1 was rough. Layoffs, re-org, Berlin All Hands, Covid-19, focused on MLS for a while, then I switched back to Socorro/Tecken full time, then virtual All Hands.

    It's September now and 2020h1 ended a long time ago, but I'm only just getting a chance to catch up and some things happened in 2020h1 that are important to divulge and we don't tell anyone about Socorro events via any other medium.

KMail account trouble

Filed under
KDE
OSS
Web

KMail is the open-source email client that I’ve always wanted to use. However, I’ve always given up on it after a few hours or days after running into critical bugs. I gave it another shot this month, and here’s how it went.

I’ve been using Evolution for the last few years. I’ve recently had serious issues with it corrupting messages, and its PGP-integration has been buggy for years. A couple of weeks ago, I needed to send off a PGP-encrypted email to [redacted] regarding a security issue. So I went looking for alternative email clients. As many times before, KMail was the first option on my list.

KMail has every feature I need, including PGP support and integration with my email provider (IMAP/SMTP) and address book server (CardDAV). It’s recommended by Use plain-text email and formats email messages in the way I like it. It even has a Unicode-compatible spellchecker (something Thunderbird is still missing in 2020!) It’s been an appealing option for me for years.

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The 10 Best Linux Web Browsers

Filed under
Software
Web

Web browsers were introduced around 1991. Since then, they have progressively advanced to operate on multiple operating systems with increased efficiency and performance. Linux, being an open-source community product, gives freedom for experimenting with several browsing features to improve functionality and usability.

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