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USDOJ Takes on Google, Mozilla Responds

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
Legal
  • Justice Department Sues Monopolist Google For Violating Antitrust Laws

    oday, the Department of Justice — along with eleven state Attorneys General — filed a civil antitrust lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to stop Google from unlawfully maintaining monopolies through anticompetitive and exclusionary practices in the search and search advertising markets and to remedy the competitive harms. The participating state Attorneys General offices represent Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, South Carolina, and Texas.

    “Today, millions of Americans rely on the Internet and online platforms for their daily lives. Competition in this industry is vitally important, which is why today’s challenge against Google — the gatekeeper of the Internet — for violating antitrust laws is a monumental case both for the Department of Justice and for the American people,” said Attorney General William Barr. “Since my confirmation, I have prioritized the Department’s review of online market-leading platforms to ensure that our technology industries remain competitive. This lawsuit strikes at the heart of Google’s grip over the internet for millions of American consumers, advertisers, small businesses and entrepreneurs beholden to an unlawful monopolist.”

  • Mozilla Reaction to U.S. v. Google

    Like millions of everyday internet users, we share concerns about how Big Tech’s growing power can deter innovation and reduce consumer choice. We believe that scrutiny of these issues is healthy, and critical if we’re going to build a better internet. We also know from firsthand experience there is no overnight solution to these complex issues. Mozilla’s origins are closely tied to the last major antitrust case against Microsoft in the nineties.

    In this new lawsuit, the DOJ referenced Google’s search agreement with Mozilla as one example of Google’s monopolization of the search engine market in the United States. Small and independent companies such as Mozilla thrive by innovating, disrupting and providing users with industry leading features and services in areas like search. The ultimate outcomes of an antitrust lawsuit should not cause collateral damage to the very organizations – like Mozilla – best positioned to drive competition and protect the interests of consumers on the web.

  • DOJ May Force Google To Sell Chrome To Settle Antitrust Case: Report

    he U.S. Department of Justice may force Google to sell its Chrome browser. The development came after the US Congress’ antitrust report on big tech companies.

    It is also told that the DOJ is targeting Google’s advertising business as well. The prosecutors aim at breaking Google’s monopoly on the $162 billion digital advertising market. Politico reported the development via anonymous sources.

Nyxt – keyboard-oriented extensible open source web browser

Filed under
Software
Web

Developing a web browser is a gargantuan task with the market dominated by a handful of web browsers. And if you want an open source graphical web browser your options are even more limited; the two popular choices are Firefox and Chromium.

Why are web browsers difficult to code? Let’s look at the components of a web browser. They typically offer a graphical user interface, an engine, and a controller. The engine is the most complicated element. Engines used by open source web browsers include WebKit, Blink, and Gecko (or the Goanna fork).

The graphical user interface is a large part of the user experience for many web browsers. Firefox sees a fair chunk of the screen estate devoted to its interface. However, advanced users prefer to declutter the interface, leaving almost all of the screen real-estate to the engine.

Step forward Nyxt. This open source web browser offers familiar key-bindings (Emacs, vi, CUA), it is fully configurable and extensible in Lisp, and sports powerful features. You may not have heard of Nyxt even though it’s attracted nearly 5K GitHub stars. Let’s put that right!

This web browser was originally called Next, but sensibly the project was recently renamed to Nyxt.

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15 Privacy-Focused Free Open-source Web Browsers That care about your Privacy

Filed under
Web

Most of the popular web browsers does not care much about user privacy with minor exceptions for Mozilla Firefox and Opera.

Privacy is not a luxury, it's a necessity especially nowadays when our private data, interests, usage behaviors are becoming a product for many companies and enterprises to use to reach us or generate more revenue.

Google Chrome is dominating other browsers with the largest share, however with its default state, it provides a basic privacy protection and requires more tools and customization to make it more privacy-aware.

Unfortunately, many users find that hard to do, as they are not experienced or that tech-savvy user. And the same goes for Mozilla Firefox.

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Web Alternatives, Chrome, Mozilla, and More

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Simplify your web experience with this internet protocol alternative

    If you've been on the internet for a very long time or you're just very resourceful, you might remember an early text-sharing protocol called Gopher. Gopher was eventually displaced by the HTTP protocol, which of course is the basis for the modern World Wide Web. For many people, the "internet" and the "World Wide Web" are the same thing, because many people don't consciously do anything online that's not on the www subdomain.

    But there have always been a variety of network protocols to share information over an interconnected network: Telnet, FTP, SSH, Torrent, GNUnet, and many more. Recently, there's been an addition to this collection of alternatives, and it's called Gemini.

    The Gemini protocol, named after the space mission between the rudimentary experiments of Project Mercury and Project Apollo, is meant to sit peacefully between Gopher and HTTP. It doesn't aim to replace the modern web, by any means, but it does try to create both a simplified web and a modernized Gopher.

  • Browse the web using Gemini on your Apple device

    Lately, I've been checking out pages on the nascent Gemini protocol, a new application-level protocol for hypertext documents. It falls somewhere between the minimalism of Gopher and the complexity and weight of the World Wide Web.

  • Chrome 86 Released With Native File-System, WebCodecs APIs

    Chrome 86 is out today as the latest feature release to Google's cross-platform web browser.

  • about:Mozilla's #introduction channel - and how it could work for your project

    Mozilla is a large community, with dozens of projects, from Firefox front-end to localization to addons.mozilla.org to Firefox Hubs to support.mozilla.org, etc. Unsurprisingly, we have many communication channels. Bugzilla and Phabricator, Github issues and Pull Requests, Matrix/Riot/Element (formerly IRC) and Discourse, etc.

  • Get ready for virtual Halloween with Mozilla Hubs

    Halloween is around the corner and like everything in 2020, it’s probably going to be different this year. Meeting up with friends is fraught, dunking for apples is right out, and going door-to-door for candy?

    [...]

    Hosting a virtual Halloween party in Hubs is easy. Visit the Hubs website, and click on “Create a Room.” A Hubs room is where you’ll invite your friends to gather. As you enter the room, you’ll need to grant mic permission so that your friends will be able to hear you talk.

  • This Week in Glean: FOG progress report

    About a year ago chutten started the "This Week in Glean" series with an initial blog post about Glean on Desktop. Back then we were just getting started to bring Glean to Firefox Desktop. No code had been written for Firefox Desktop, no proposals had been written to discuss how we even do it.

    Now, 12 months later, after four completed milestones, a dozen or so proposal and quite a bit of code, the Project Firefox on Glean (FOG) is finally getting into a stage where we can actually use and test it. It's not ready for prime time yet, but FOG is enabled in Firefox Nightly already.

    Over the past 4 weeks I've been on and off working on building out our support for a C++ and a JavaScript API. Soon Firefox engineers will be able to instrument their code using Glean. In C++ this will look like:

PHP 8.0.0 Release Candidate 1

Filed under
Development
Web

  • PHP 8.0.0 Release Candidate 1 available for testing

    The PHP team is pleased to announce the eighth testing release of PHP 8.0.0, Release Candidate 1.

    At this time, we're not planning to adjust the GA date, however this may change during the course of the RC cycle. The updated release schedule can, as always, be found on the PHP Wiki page about the PHP 8.0.

  • PHP 8.0 RC1 Released

    The first release candidate of the big PHP 8.0 is now available for testing.

    PHP 8.0 is continuing to enhance the performance with the introduction of the PHP JIT and other optimizations as a big upgrade over PHP 7.x and now an insanely different beast from the sluggish days of PHP 5.x. PHP 8.0 also brings the JSON support into PHP core rather than an optional extension, improves the PHP GD imaging library, cryptographic message syntax support within PHP OpenSSL, PHP Zip improvements, and countless other enhancements. The PHP language now supports union types, the nullsafe operator, attributes, match expressions, and more.

Mozilla and Firefox Promotion, Pale Moon Web Browser 28.14 Released

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Join the anti-establishment

    Firefox puts people first. In fact, we’re backed by a not-for-profit and our profits go back into making the internet UNFCKING BELIEVABLE FOR YOU.

    Luckily, we aren’t the only ones who believe that the internet works best when your privacy and security are protected. There are a number of us out there pushing for an internet that is powered by more than a handful of large tech companies, because we believe the more choice you have the better things are for you — and for the web. We vetted these companies for how they treat your data and for their potential to shake up things up. In short: they’re solid.

  • The internet needs our love

    It’s noisy out there. We are inundated with sensational headlines every minute, of every day. You almost could make a full-time job of sorting the fun, interesting or useful memes, feeds and reels from those that should be trashed. It’s hard to know what to pay attention to, and where to put your energy. With so much noise, chaos and division, it seems that one of the only things we all have in common is relying on the internet to help us navigate everything that’s happening in the world, and in our lives.

  • Pale Moon Web Browser 28.14 Released [Ubuntu PPA]

    Pale Moon, an open-source Goanna-based web browser, released version 28.14.0 (and 28.14.1 with quick fix) with stability and security improvements.

  • Mozilla Partners with the African Telecommunications Union to Promote Rural Connectivity

    Mozilla and the African Telecommunications Union (ATU) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for a joint project that will promote rural connectivity in the Africa region. “The project, pegged to the usage of spectrum policy, regulations and practices, is designed to ensure affordable access to communication across the continent,” said ATU Secretary-General John OMO. “Figuring out how to make spectrum accessible, particularly in rural areas, is critical to bringing people online throughout the African continent,” said Mitchell Baker, CEO of Mozilla, “I’m committed to Mozilla making alliances to address this challenge.”

    While half the world is now connected to the internet, the existing policy, regulatory, financial, and technical models are not fit for purpose to connect the poorer and more sparsely populated rural areas. More needs to be done to achieve the United Nations’ universal access goals by 2030. Clear policy and regulatory interventions that can support innovation, and new business models to speed up progress, are urgently required.

  • This is how we unfck the internet

    We have a once-in-a-lifetime chance to unfck the internet. We should take it. How we talk, work, and play online depends on it.

    Dramatic? No, Kardashians is dramatic. The truth is we have more than a few problems to deal with. A whole sh*tton of how we communicate is controlled by a few centi-billionaires. That’s a new word for all of us: centi-billionaire. It means worth over $100 billion USD. Each.

    [...]

    People deserve to feel safe with the knowledge that their personal information is shielded from hackers, spies and strangers. Let’s Encrypt, an alliance Mozilla helped found, now delivers greater security to over 85% of web transactions — while adding the “s” in “https://” — proving that security is possible on a large scale. With security comes trust, and trust will be the bedrock of a better internet.

Why web developers need to target open source browsers

Filed under
OSS
Web

In a recent article I wrote: Web browser developers are failing their most important task, I took aim at web developers for forgetting the most important task of a web browser was rendering web pages. In this article, it's time I took a turn at web developers.

Once upon a whimsical time, web sites were nothing more than simple HTML. Those now ancient relics were static, sometimes hard to read (remember Geocities and all those black backgrounds and red fonts?), but a lot of fun to explore. They also, for the most part, were rendered the same across the board. Even text browsers like Lynx could faithfully render those sites, minus the animated backgrounds and various images. But the text? Oh yeah, Lynx could handle it.

So too could Netscape Navigator, Internet Explorer (IE), Opera (which actually came into being on April 10, 1995), and Mozilla (the original Firefox).

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Tails 4.11 is Out With Major Security Vulnerability Fixes

Filed under
OS
Linux
Security
Web

The Tails (The Amnesic Incognito Live System) team recently announced the release of their latest version, Tails 4.11 with several major security vulnerability fixes added on top the numerous security holes fixed in Tails 4.10.

The Debian-based, live distro with the sole purpose of providing users with Internet anonymity by directing Internet traffic through the Tor network and at the same time, providing built-in tools for a secure work environment just received its latest release which has the primary focus of squashing bugs and toughening security.

The distro has received fixes to numerous major security issues that existed in earlier versions and the developers strongly encourage users to upgrade their versions to the latest immediately.

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Ade Malsasa Akbar on CloudTube and Mailo

Filed under
Web
  • Let's Welcome CloudTube

    Do you remember Invidious Everywhere? Since early September Invidio.us is unfortunately officially closed and the Invidious web software development is now seeking for new maintainer. Thank you Omarroth for this incredibly good YouTube front end for your hard works help people and me truly a lot for these years. However, there is a good news, it is CloudTube now an alternative to Invidious so we can watch YouTube right in the web browser without being tracked nor running nonfree javascript.

  • Mailo Email Service for Internet Users

    Here is Mailo a new email service you can register to based in France, Europe. With Mailo your email address will be like malsasa@mailo.com. It promises ethical emails, offers free accounts, and gives imap feature with beautiful yet easy to use interface. What's so special about Mailo is it's friendly to everyone using Free Libre Open Source Software in general and everyone seeking privacy alternative to Gmail in particular. It is featured in Free Software Foundation's Webmail Systems page. For you who are looking for secure email other than Disroot or Tutanota, Mailo is very promising. By this article I wish our readers try and give us comments about it.

10 Open Source Static Site Generators to Create Fast and Resource-Friendly Websites

Filed under
OSS
Web

Technically, a static website means the webpages are not generated on the server dynamically. The HTML, CSS, JavaScript lie on the server in the version the end user receives it. The raw source code files are already prebuilt, the source code doesn’t change with the next server request.

It’s FOSS is a dynamic website which depends on several databases and the web pages are generated and served when there’s a request from your browser. Majority of the web is powered by dynamic sites where you interact with the websites and there are plenty of content that often change.

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