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DistroWatch resolves its domain registrar problems

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Web

Last week the Linux world was surprised to find that DistroWatch was not available at its usual domain name. Many wondered what was happening with the site, and it turned out that it had some domain registrar problems. Ladislav Bonar clarifies what went wrong last week and assures DistroWatch readers that the site has already been transferred to a new registrar.

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Breach is a completely modular, hackable and open source web browser

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OSS
Web

When it comes to surfing the web, our options are limited: the market is dominated by three or four mainstream web browsers, all of which share major similarities in design and function. Unless you want to build your own browsing program, you're stuck with their modern browsing paradigms. For San Francisco programmer Stanislas Polu, that wasn't good enough, so, he created Breach -- an open source modular web browser designed to allow anybody to tweak and modify it on a whim.

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Linux's DistroWatch site stumbles

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Linux
Web

It appears that DistroWatch went down because of some kind of account issue with its web-hosting provider. This would not be the first, nor last, time an important site went down because of a simple payment problem. The website's last update, a listing for the new version of Scientific Linux, was posted on July 4th.

The one thing we know for certain is that DistroWatch's dropping off the net at this point is not because its domain registration has expired. DistroWatch's domain doesn't expire until July 3, 2018.

It appears that DistroWatch went down because of some kind of account issue with its web-hosting provider. This would not be the first, nor last, time an important site went down because of a simple payment problem. The website's last update, a listing for the new version of Scientific Linux, was posted on July 4th.

The one thing we know for certain is that DistroWatch's dropping off the net at this point is not because its domain registration has expired. DistroWatch's domain doesn't expire until July 3, 2018

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Two Months & Counting, LGP Remains Offline

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Web
Gaming

At the end of April LGP was migrating servers and expected to "keep downtime to an absolute minimum" while more than two months later the once leading Linux game publishing company remains offline.

It's been more than two months now that LinuxGamePublishing.com has gone dark and no status about their game DRM copy-protection servers. There's also been no new updates via their Facebook page when mentioning, "As part of improving our infrastructure and leading towards some exciting new developments LGP will be migrating hosts and servers over the next few days. We will, of course, attempt to keep downtime to an absolute minimum but there will be downtime. The absolute priority must be our game servers so that everyone can continue playing games. These will be up on the new platform first, followed by the website and other services." I've also received no updates via email.

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Replacing freecode: a proposal

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OSS
Web

Web frameworks have gotten much more powerful since the original Freshmeat was built 17 years ago; today, I think building a replacement wouldn’t be a huge project. It is not, however, something I am willing to try to do alone. Whether or not this goes forward will depend on how many people are willing to step up and join me. I figure we need a team of about three core co-developers, at least one of whom needs to have some prior expertise at whatever framework we end up using.

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Review: DuckDuckGo Compared to Google, Bing, Yandex

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Reviews
Web

If you are reading this article, you’ve probably already heard of DuckDuckGo. Internet users that stick with the status quo usually don’t look any farther than the first search option offered by their web browser. On the other hand, inquisitive users that depend on the Internet for statistics, comparisons, and hidden pearls of useful information are probably all too familiar with the perks and pitfalls of the current Internet search engines. DuckDuckGo was nothing more than a miniscule blip on the radar of demanding Internet searchers since its inception in 2008. However, the recent scandal of NSA monitoring resulted in a massive influx of users defecting to DuckDuckGo. And a major refresh of DuckDuckGo’s interface in May, 2014 also attracted the attention of many new users, including myself. So, how does DuckDuckGo compare to the big players in the Internet search engine field? Will users who prefer DuckDuckGo for privacy related issues find what they are searching for? And are there any advantages to using DuckDuckGo based solely on the merits of its interface and search result quality? That’s what we hope to determine in this article.

Open Letter to European Commission about DRM in HTML5

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Web

Dear Commissioner Malmstroem,

we are writing to you on the occasion of the international Day Against Digital Restrictions Management, which today is being celebrated around the world. We are very concerned about the security of European citizens, and we ask you to take action to protect them.

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is an independent charitable non-profit dedicated to promoting Free Software and freedom in the information society. Today we would like to direct your attention to a very specific threat to the freedom and security of computer users everywhere.

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An open source success: EFF ‘awed’ by response to project for easily contacting Congress

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OSS
Web

On Tuesday, the Electronic Frontier Foundation called on hackers to revolutionize how everyday people contact Congress — and it’s been absolutely floored by the response.

The digital rights advocate is building a free, public domain tool that makes it simple to contact any member of Congress from one central location. The EFF and project partner Sunlight Foundation finished the backend themselves, but they needed help from web developers to test all the different forms for each member of Congress.

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IoT dev kit includes Linux-based multiprocol router

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Linux
Hardware
Web

Echelon introduced its IzoT Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) framework for peer-to-peer networking of embedded controllers last October. At that time, the building automation and smart grid networking vendor released the IzoT multi-protocol stack in an ARM-ready beta version and reference implementation optimized for the Linux-based Raspberry Pi SBC. Since then, support has extended to the BeagleBone Black.

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Open source project builds mobile networks without big carriers

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OSS
Web

Open source projects garner the attention of the tech community because the passionate people behind these developments occasionally cause major disruption and create opportunities to change industries, as Android and Linux did.

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CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

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