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Web/Browsers

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Web
  • Weblate 2.13.1

    Weblate 2.13.1 has been released quickly after 2.13. It fixes few minor issues and possible upgrade problem.

  • Vivaldi 1.9 Development Continues, Web Browser Now Based on Chromium 58

    We told you last week that development of the Vivaldi 1.9 web browser kicked off in style with the first snapshot, which brought numerous improvements to existing features, as well as some new ones.

    At the request of many users, Vivaldi 1.9 will let you shuffle the order of your extensions, and today's Vivaldi 1.9.811.13 snapshot is here to make it easier to fine tune screenshots taken with the built-in screenshot tool, but also to improve the URL autocomplete functionality and the Chromecasting Tab.

  • Google deprecates Octane JavaScript benchmark, because everyone is basically cheating

    Google has announced that its widely used Octane JavaScript benchmark is being retired, with Google saying that it's no longer a useful way for browser developers to determine how best to optimize their JavaScript engines.

    Octane was developed for and by the developers of V8, the JavaScript engine used in Chrome. It was intended to address flaws in the earlier SunSpider benchmark, developed by Apple's Safari team. SunSpider's tests were all microbenchmarks, sometimes testing something as small as a single operation performed thousands of times. It wasn't very representative of real-world code, and it was arguably being gamed, with browser vendors introducing optimizations that were aimed primarily, albeit not exclusively, at boosting SunSpider scores. This was being done even when those optimizations were detrimental to real-world performance, because having a good score carried so much prestige.

  • Chrome 59 To Support Headless Mode

    Chrome 59 stable isn't expected until early June, but when this release comes it will bring with it an interesting feature: a headless mode.

    Chrome's headless mode is made for headless/server environments, such as where you may automatically want to be capturing screenshots of rendered pages, etc. This is very practical for automated testing. Or there's the use-case of just wanting to interact with the DOM but not caring about presenting the contents on any connected physical display.

3 open source boilerplate web design templates

Filed under
OSS
Web

In the olden days, creating a website from scratch was easy.

With a basic understanding of HTML, and maybe a little CSS, you could put together a pretty functional web page with very little effort. Throw it onto your web server, and you were good to go.

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Vivaldi and Opera Web Browsers

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Web

Vivaldi 1.8

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk teams with Kolab for open source groupware

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk, one of the major providers of website management solutions, has chosen Kolab Systems’ groupware solution for its millions of users.

"You can now deploy Kolab in your Plesk installation with the Premium Email powered by Kolab extension. this extension is a step forward in the field of turn key groupware and online collaboration software. This package is easy and convenient to deploy — it can literally be installed in a few clicks, and it provides full Kolab functionality without the inconveniences and potential pitfalls of having to install Kolab from the ground up," said Kolab Systems in a press release.

This deal shows us why smart companies put their eggs in the open source basket instead of relying on proprietary solutions.

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Chromium and Chrome

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chromium Rolls Out Enhanced GTK3 Theme Support

    Chromium is sporting greater GTK3 support in its latest daily development snapshots. Developers have begun building the browser with proper GTK3 theme integration enabled by default. I know: hardly ground breaking, but as Chromium (and its more popular sibling, Google Chrome) are widely used by Ubuntu users, it’s a change worth a note.

  • Chrome 58 Beta: IndexedDB 2.0, an improvement to iframe navigation, and immersive full screen for PWAs

    The IndexedDB 2.0 standard is now fully supported in Chrome, making it simpler to work with large data sets in the browser. IDB 2.0 features new schema management, bulk action methods, and more standardized handling of failures.

  • Chrome 58 Beta Supports IndexedDB 2.0, New Developer Features

    Google developers are busy today not only with the Android O Developer Preview but the Chrome team has delivered the first public beta for the upcoming Chrome 58.0.

    The Chrome 58 beta adds full support for IndexedDB 2.0, improvements to iframe navigation by adding a new sandbox keyword to control iframe top navigation behavior, immersive full-screen support for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and various other developer changes.

Chrome and Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Tor Browser 6.5 Gets First Point Release to Support Tor 0.2.9.10, OpenSSL 1.0.2k

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Tor Project announced the immediate availability of the first point release of the Tor Browser 6.5 stable branch of the open-source, Firefox-based anonymity web browser with enhanced security and privacy features based on Tor.

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Microsoft’s browsers are shedding users, new Firefox for Ubuntu, Firefox axes Windows XP support

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Node.js Coverage

Filed under
Development
Web
  • Node.js: A project for casual contributors

    I sat down at the Open Source Leadership Summit to record a podcast with Mikeal Rogers, who heads the Node.js Foundation, a collaborative project under the Linux Foundation. He observed that one of the characteristics of Node.js and its community is that it's a "post-GitHub platform," meaning "the first release of Node.js and the first code written on Node.js were in a GitHub repository. That's the environment we live in, so we had to come up with some newer ways of managing the project that are unique to this newer and more modern open source."

  • Tune Up Your Code with the Crankshaft Compiler

    Safia Abdalla is an open source developer and a maintainer on a project called nteract, but her pet topic is compilers. And, in her talk at Node.js Interactive, Abdalla explained the inner workings of the V8 compiler and how it can optimize the code it gets fed. Although Abdalla specifically focused on what goes on in the V8 compiler, she noted that there are many similarities to other compilers.

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More in Tux Machines

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more

BSD: Testing OpenSSH 7.6, 23 Years of FreeDOS

  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 7.6

    OpenSSH 7.6p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • 23 Years of FreeDOS

    This eBook contains the voices of many of the users who contributed their stories, as well as the history of FreeDOS. Many individuals have helped make FreeDOS what it is, but this eBook represents only a few of them. I hope you enjoy this collection of 23 years of everything FreeDOS!

Various Leftovers

  • XFree KWin: Ridding KDE's Wayland Compositor Of X11 Dependencies
    Martin Flöser (nee Gräßlin) has announced the "XFree KWin" project. This isn't to be confused with XFree86 but rather is about ridding KWin optionally of X11/X.Org dependencies.
  • Bad News for Users of TopIcons Plus
    The development of the popular TopIcons Plus GNOME extension has been put on pause. Offering a convenient way to access indicator applets and system tray icons from the GNOME top bar, the extension has proven popular with GNOME Shell users, especially as GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray entirely.
  • Fix the “This version of Skype is not supported” Error on Ubuntu
  • Will Blockchain Race to the Front of the Disruption Line in IoT?
    The group, founded in 2015, is the fastest-growing project in the history of the Linux Foundation according to Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf.  This project has reached out to various industries in addition to IoT, industries which also are adopting IoT including healthcare.
  • The State Of Intel's GPU Virtualization Pass-Through On Linux
    Wrapping up our XDC2017 coverage for this annual X.Org developer event that took place this past week in Mountain View, Zhenyu Wang of Intel presented on their ongoing work for mediated GPU virtualization pass-through support on Linux, Intel GVT.
  • Red Hat announces that Ansible Project 2.4 now generally available
    Red Hat announced this week general availability of Ansible Project 2.4, its simple and agentless open source IT automation framework. The upstream Ansible project is one of the world’s most popular open source IT automation technologies, with nearly 3,000 unique contributors, more than 32,000 commits to the upstream Ansible open source project, and a user base that spans industries and the globe.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is Under Analysts Radar
  • Best Self-Hosted CRM Apps
    Customer relationship management or simply CRM is a term or specifically an approach to managing and analyzing the interaction of your current customers and leads. The CRM software allows you to manage the customer data, customer interaction, automate sales, manage client contacts and employees, customer support etc. In this article we will cover some of the best self-hosted CRM applications which you can install on a CRM Linux VPS and use for managing your company.
  • Electric Cars, Open Source Summit, and Linux Server Innovation [Ed: "This article was sponsored and written by IBM." Linux Foundation writes what Big Bully IBM tells it to write.]
  • Intel IX4 Networking Performance On DragonFly Gets Boosted By Direct Input Support
    DragonFlyBSD today picked up direct input support within the kernel's polling code. This can boost the networking performance though for now is just supported by the IX4 driver, what is used as the Intel 10Gb Ethernet driv
  • Chicago School Official: US IT Jobs Offshored Because 'We Weren't Making Our Own' Coders
    In the video, the Director of Computer Science and IT Education for the nation's third largest school district offers a take on why U.S. IT jobs were offshored that jibes nicely with the city's new computer science high school graduation requirement. From the transcript: "People still talk about it's all offshored, it's all in India and you know, there are some things that are there but they don't even realize some of the reasons that they went there in the first place is because we weren't making our own."
  • After the breach, Equifax now faces the lawsuits
    Since it announced a massive data breach earlier this month, Equifax has been hit with dozens of lawsuits from shareholders, consumers and now one filed by a small Wisconsin credit union that represents what could be the first by a financial institution attempting to preemptively recoup losses caused by alleged fraud the hack could cause. Equifax has said its breach exposed sensitive information about 143 million consumers, including Social Security and driver's license numbers. This kind of data could be used for identity theft and to create fake accounts, cybersecurity experts have said.