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Chrome 60 Beta, New Firefox, Thunderbird Themes

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Web
  • Chrome 60 Beta Rolls Out With VP9 Improvements, New Developer Features

    Chrome 60 Beta adds a Paint Timing API to provide more insight to developers about their "first paint" performance, CSS font-display support, improvements to the Credential Management API, the Payment Request API has been added to desktop Chrome, there's a new Web Budget API to allow sites using push notifications to send a limited number of push messages that will trigger background work, support for Web Push Encryption was added, and a range of other CSS/JavaScript features and APIs.

  • The Best Firefox Ever

    On the Firefox team, one thing we always hear from our users is that they rely on the web for complex tasks like trip planning and shopping comparisons. That often means having many tabs open. And the sites and web apps running in those tabs often have lots of things going on– animations, videos, big pictures and more. Complex sites are more and more common. The average website today is nearly 2.5 megabytes – the same size as the original version of the game Doom, according to Wired. Up until now, a complex site in one Firefox tab could slow down all the others. That often meant a less than perfect browsing experience.

  • Thunderbird Arc Theme Updated With Support for Arc Variants

    An update to the Arc Thunderbird theme add-on is now available for download, and brings support for the 3 Arc GTK theme variants.

WordPress 4.8 Overview and Working From Home

Filed under
OSS
Web

Browsers: Chrome 61, Mozilla Against Software Patents, Firefox Photon, and Tor 7.0

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

How open source is advancing the Semantic Web

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Semantic Web, a term coined by World Wide Web (WWW) inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee, refers to the concept that all the information in all the websites on the internet should be able to interoperate and communicate. That vision, of a web of knowledge that supplies information to anyone who wants it, is continuing to emerge and grow.

In the first generation of the WWW, Web 1.0, most people were consumers of content, and if you had a web presence it was comprised of a series of static pages conveyed in HTML. Websites had guest books and HTML forms, powered by Perl and other server-side scripting languages, that people could fill out. While HTML provides structure and syntax to the web, it doesn't provide meaning; therefore Web 1.0 couldn't inject meaning into the vast resources of the WWW.

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Chrome 59 and Chromium

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web

Broswers: Chrome, Servo, and Firefox

Filed under
Web
  • Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

    Publishers will get a six-month headsup before Google kills intrusive advertising on Chrome, sources close to the ad giant have reportedly said.

    Google will also hand online publishers a special tool to make sure that their ads are "compliant", the WSJ was told, called "Ad Experience Reports" – ostensibly to be based on the recommendations of industry group the Coalition for Better Ads, of which Facebook and Google are members.

  • flatpak-ing Servo Nightly

    Servo - that rendering engine written in Rust - can be built from source. But there are also nightly builds available.

  • Mozilla Brings Virtual Reality to all Firefox Users

    We are delighted to announce that WebVR will ship on by default for all Windows users with an HTC VIVE or Oculus Rift headset in Firefox 55 (currently scheduled for August 8th). WebVR transforms Virtual Reality (VR) into a first-class experience on the web, giving it the infinite possibilities found in the openness and interoperability of the Web Platform. When coupled with WebGL to render 3D graphics, these APIs transform the browser into a platform that allows VR content to be published to the Web and instantaneously consumed from any capable VR device.

Web Browsers: WebAssembly and Mozilla's Open-Source Hackathon

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

  • Goodbye PNaCl, Hello WebAssembly!

    Historically, running native code on the web required a browser plugin. In 2013, we introduced the PNaCl sandbox to provide a means of building safe, portable, high-performance apps without plugins. Although this worked well in Chrome, it did not provide a solution that worked seamlessly across all browsers.

  • Google Plans End To PNaCl Support In Favor Of WebAssembly

    The Portable Native Client (PNaCl) ecosystem hasn't been too vibrant for executing native code in web-browsers given its lack of adoption outside of Google/Chrome and other factors. With WebAssembly seeing much broader adoption and inroads, Google is planning to end PNaCl.

  • Mozilla’s Giant, Distributed, Open-Source Hackathon

    Mozilla’s annual Global Sprint is scheduled for June 1 and 2. It’s an international public event: an opportunity for anyone, anywhere to energize their open-source projects with fresh insight and input from around the world.

    Participants include biostatisticians from Brazil, research scientists from Canada, engineers from Nepal, gamers from the U.S., and fellows from Princeton University. In years past, hundreds of individuals in more than 35 cities have participated in the Global Sprint.

Proprietary Browsers and Proprietary Games

Filed under
Software
Web
Gaming
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Web Browser to Let You Control New Tab Behavior Through Extensions

    The development of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.10 web browser continues at fast pace, and today we see the availability of a new snapshot, versioned 1.10.838.7, which implements more new features, but also fixes several regressions.

    Coming only one week after the previous snapshot, which added a new way to sort downloads, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.10.838.7 is the third in this development cycle, and it attempts to implement a new functionality that promises to allow users to control the behavior of new tabs directly from extensions. It will be located under Settings -> Tabs -> New Tab Page -> Control by Extension.

  • Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook

    Vivaldi, which was created by Opera's co-founder and former CEO, continues along its own path, focusing on privacy, security, and interesting enhancements to tabbed browsing. Vivaldi hit version 1.9 last week and now lets you "plant trees as you surf."

  • Wednesday Madness, a quick look at some good Linux gaming deals
  • Project Zomboid adds vehicles in a new beta

    I've tested it and as they mentioned in the announcement forum post, it is an early work in progress. Cars have no sound, sometimes other textures go on top of the car which looks weird and there are other issues. Even so, it's still awesome to finally be able to play around with vehicles to move around the map quicker.

4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

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Chrome 58 Released

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 58 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

  • Chrome 58 Makes Its Debut

    Not long after the Firefox 53 release, Google has promoted Chrome 58 to stable.

    Chrome 58 is now available with a number of fixes, new features, and a number of security fixes too. A list of the CVE fixes can be found in the release announcement.

  • Google Promotes Chrome 58 to Stable Channel with 29 Security Fixes, Improvements

    Google announced a few moments ago the promotion of the Chrome 58 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

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More in Tux Machines

Videos: Akademy 2017 Talk, Upgrading Linux Mint, This Week in Linux

  • Akademy 2017 talk
    The talk by Jean-Baptiste Mardelle’s at Akademy 2017 is released along with many other interesting talks. Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community.
  • How To In-place Upgrade Linux Mint
    This video shows how to upgrade Linux Mint from 17.3 to 18.3 while keeping all of your personal data intact. Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.
  • Linux Kernel 4.14, Firefox Quantum, Fedora 27, Munich? Meh | This Week in Linux 14
    On this episode of This Week in Linux. The first 6 Year LTS Linux Kernel was released this week. Huge Update from Mozilla with Firefox Quantum. New distro releases from Fedora and Slax.

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend. Read more

Microsoft Worker Leaves for Google, Criticizes Post-Windows Vista Dev Strategy

Microsoft employee Tim Sneath, who spent no less than 17 years with the company, announced in a blog post that he’s leaving the software giant to work for Google on the new Flutter mobile framework. Sneath started his post by emphasizing how great Microsoft is, explaining that he company has “incredibly diverse interests” and is “filled with talented people.” Despite the good parts, however, the former Microsoft Program Manager who worked on a series of projects for developers, discussed what he described as the “missteps” that the Redmond-based software giant embraced beginning with the Windows Vista era. Read more Also: ‘Goodbye Microsoft, hello Linux’

LiFT Scholarship Recipients Advance Open Source Around the World

Fifteen people from 13 different countries have received Linux Foundation Training Scholarships (LiFT) in the category of Linux Newbies. This year, 27 people received scholarships across all categories — the most ever awarded by the Foundation. Now in its seventh year, the program awards training scholarships to current and aspiring IT professionals worldwide who may not otherwise have the means for specialized training. The Foundation has awarded 75 scholarships worth more than $168,000 since the program began. Read more