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7 Fantastic Internet Hoaxes

Filed under
Web

informationweek.com: Despite our increasing technological sophistication, we can't help falling for email about Bigfoot, giant mutant cats, doomed tourists, and deadly butt spiders. Admit it. Even you, a savvy veteran e-mail user, have fallen for one or more of these Internet rumors.

Boycott Novell: Champion of freedom or den of paranoia?

Filed under
Linux
Web

linux.com: Few sites about free software attract more controversy than Boycott Novell. Founded in 2006 in response to the first Microsoft-Novell deal, as its name suggests, the site has evolved more recently into a site for commentary and investigation of any subject that might be a threat to free software.

Linux.conf.au hits domain disaster

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Linux
Web

zdnet.com.au: The website of Australia's annual Linux conference has become temporarily inaccessible scant months before the event because of policy confusion over whether or not it is allowed to use its long-standing domain name.

Interesting Linux Blogs To Follow

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxhaxor.net: There are a lot of interesting blogs out there focusing on FOSS and Linux development, even though most of them are news aggregators, some of them publishes original contents which is what I am most interested in.

KDE Launches User Forums

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KDE
Web

dot.kde.org: The KDE Community today launches the new KDE Forum. The new forum uses the bulletin board software MyBB offering users, developers and people interested in KDE a place to help each other, discuss KDE-related topics and exchange ideas.

Happy 10th Birthday Linux Today

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Web

linuxtoday.com: Ten years and going strong is quite an achievement. In that time LT has survived the dot-bomb and many changes. The archives have been maintained and are still available, which I think is pretty amazing-- you can go all the way back to the very first Linux Today story: Apache 1.3.2 is released.

20 websites that changed the world

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Web

techradar.com: If there was one site that would change the world for ever, it would be the first ever website, created by internet pioneer Tim Berners-Lee.

UserBase: A Tour

Filed under
KDE
Web

jucato.org/blog: Taking a break from my website “duties” (some other blog post), I thought of doing some UserBase “marketing”. This has been one of the pet projects of the KDE Community Working Group and one that I’ve been personally and deeply involved in. This “tour” tries to highlight some of the features and goals of the wiki.

Linux News Sites Web Traffic Slowdown: Is this for real?

Filed under
Linux
Web

junauza.com: As with the U.S. economy, it seems like the web traffic of several well-known Linux related news sites are slowing down. According to statistics from Alexa, famous sites like Slashdot, Linux.com, and Linux Journal among others have a sudden decrease in site visitors.

50 significant moments from internet history

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Web

zdnet.com.au: We decided to plough the history of the entire internet, from the roots of its underlying technology, to the Web properties that helped it explode, the litigation it endured on the way and disasters companies have suffered as a result of the Net's popularity. We've picked 50 of what we think are the most significant moments.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • KDE Kirigami 1.1 UI Framework Released
  • [GNOME Maps:] Planning a trip
  • Etcher Image Writer Is Now Better Than Ever
    Back in may we spotlighted Etcher, a stylish open-source USB image writer app for Windows, macOS and Linux. In the months since our feature the app has released a over 10 small beta updates, with Etcher 1.5 Beta being the most recent release at the time of writing.
  • Audacious 3.8 released
    Audacious 3.8 was released on September 21, 2016.
  • New Version of Audacious Music Player Released
    A new version of Audacious, a popular lightweight audio player, is now available for download. Audacious 3.8 introduces a small set of features, including the ability to run more than one instance of the app at the same time. Quite why… no idea. New audtool commands have been added, including stream recording toggles, and cue sheet support is said to be “more seamless”.
  • Rambox Puts All Your Favorite Messaging Services In One App
    Rambox is a free, open-source messaging and email app that groups all your favourite web apps into one easy-to-manage window. Sound familiar? We’ve highlighted apps like Rambox before, with Franz and the Gmail-specific Wmail being but two.
  • Stylish Markdown Editor ‘Typora’ Is Now Available for Ubuntu
    In the market for a desktop markdown editor for Linux? You may have helped but notice that you’re rather spoilt for choice. From Abricotine and Scratch to Simplenote, Springseed and Remarkable. Even Gedit can render markdown with the right plugin! With so much choice it can be difficult to know which app to pick.
  • YoutPlayer Floats Your Fave YouTube Videos on The Desktop [Ed: just an Electron app]
    Looking for a neat-o way to play YouTube playlists on your desktop, outside your browser? Take a looksie at Yout, an Electron app that lets you add and watch YouTube playlists on your desktop, floating window stylee. Yout is not the most user-friendly of apps.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Avoid the pile-up in 'Clustertruck', a first-person platformer with day-1 Linux support, it's great
    We have been steadily getting more 3D "beat the timer" games where you're up against others times, which is great because they really can be fun. I do love getting competitive in certain games, especially with some of my Steam friends and friends in the wider community. Games like this recently have been something I've been repeatedly going back to for a break from life. Clustertruck is not only about beating the times of other people, but it's also a "the floor is lava" game, so if you touch the floor you have to start again. The really funny thing is that the safe pads are moving trucks you have to keep up with. You can at least grab onto the back of a truck if you just about touch it, so it's not always instant death.
  • Fusion 3, the next generation game engine and editor from Clickteam will support Linux
    The difference between their tools and others, is the event system. Instead of needing to program every single line, you can stack up events and link them together to create a game. It works quite well and I'm pretty excited to give Fusion 3 a go on Linux myself to see what random games I can create for fun.