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Open source software law review goes live

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Web

computerworld.com.au: A new legal journal covering analysis and commentary of free and open source software (FOSS) issues has launched today.

Reddit readers rage at thankless Linux Twitter-bot

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Web

itwire.com: Readers of the Linux section on popular Web 2.0 social networking site Reddit discovered a Twitter bot was tweeting stories listed on the site without attribution. As punishment Redditers decided to turn the bot into their puppet, mouthing whatever they commanded.

Final days: Tectonic to close

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Web

tectonic.co.za: This is my final post on Tectonic. After more than nine years I have decided that it is time to close the site and move on to new projects.

Attempted Break-In on www.centos.org

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Web

lwn.net: CentOS is reporting that there was a break-in attempt made on the www.centos.org server. Due to an "administrative error", the Xoops content management system was abused to put some content onto the web server.

A brand new look for KDE Community forums

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KDE
Web

dennogumi.org: Today, a major upgrade of the KDE Community Forums took place. The change brings quite a number of changes to the forums themselves, and it’s a further step towards providing a better experience for KDE users.

Ubuntu Wiki - not shareable?

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Web
Ubuntu

happyassassin.net: I may be missing something here (be great if I am), but it seems to me that the content of the Ubuntu Wiki - which contains some great stuff - is not licensed under one of the common ’shareable’ licenses, like CC, GFDL or OPL.

Digg, Dug, Buried: How Linux news disappears

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Linux
Web

blogs.computerworld: Like it or lump it, the major reason that determines whether any given online story will get read or not is how much play it gets on news link sharing sites and social networks like Digg, reddit, and StumbleUpon. That sounds like democracy in its most basic form, but in practice what it really means that stories can be buried from sight by abusive users with an ax to grind.

SquirrelMail open source project's web server hacked

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Security
Web

h-online.com: It has just become apparent that, on June 16, attackers hacked into the web server of the SquirrelMail open source project. The operators have suspended all accounts and reset all crucial passwords.

Novell Pet project

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Web

novell.com: Perhaps you have allergies or maybe you live in a small apartment, and so you’ve lived without the companionship of an animal friend. Well, no matter what your circumstances now you can have your own virtual pet Geeko.

Another Site Shuns GNU/Linux Users

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Web

riplinton.blogspot: I have used MapsOnUs for years to map out my trips. Recently I started getting a message, that my browser is not supported.

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More in Tux Machines

Tumbleweed Update

  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen
    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed. There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH. The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13
    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January. Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

India Digital Open Summit 2018

Compact Quark-based embedded computer sells for $120

Advantech’s “UBC-222” is an embedded computer that runs Yocto Linux on an Intel Quark X1000 with up to 1GB DDR3, dual 10/100 LAN ports, and a mini-PCIe socket with LTE-ready SIM slot. Read more

Press Coverage About Wine 3.0

  • Windows apps on Linux: Wine 3.0 is out now with Direct3D 10, 11 support
    Wine 3.0 is now available to help you run Windows applications and games on Linux, macOS, and BSD systems. Wine -- or 'Wine is Not an Emulator' -- is a compatibility layer that implements the Windows API on top of Unix and Linux, to help you run Windows apps when needed. Currently, about 25,000 applications are compatible with Wine, with the most popular all being games, including Final Fantasy XI, Team Fortress 2, EVE, and StarCraft.
  • Wine 3.0 is here to run Windows software on your Linux box
    When people make the switch from Windows to Linux, they often experiment with Wine. If you aren’t familiar, it is a compatibility layer that can sometimes get Windows software to run on Linux and BSD. I say "sometimes" because it isn’t a flawless experience. In fact, it can be quite frustrating to use. I suggest using native Linux software as an alternative, but understandably, that isn’t always possible. If you depend on Wine, or want to start trying it out, I am happy to say that version 3.0 is finally available. It is quite the significant update too, as it features over 6,000 changes!
  • Have three WINEs this weekend, because WINE 3.0 has landed
    Version 3.0 of Wine Is Not an Emulator – aka WINE – has arrived, and offers all sorts of new emulation-on-Android possibilities. WINE lets users run Windows applications on Linux, MacOS, Solaris, and FreeBSD, plus other POSIX-compliant operating system. To do so it “translates Windows API calls into POSIX calls on-the-fly”, an arrangement its developers rate as more efficient than virtualization while “allowing you to cleanly integrate Windows applications into your desktop.”
  • Wine 3.0 Released To Run Windows Apps On Linux Efficiently — Download It Here
    Just recently, we told you that the support for Linux distros in VirtualBox is about to get a lot better with the release of Linux kernel 4.16. But, what if you wish to run Windows apps on your host Linux system? For that, Wine has got your back.