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Linux attack worse than feared

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techworld.com: Security researchers claim that a mass attack of websites is much worse than was feared. According to ScanSafe, the attack has affected at least 10,000 sites.

Red Hat’s Mugshot

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blogs.techrepublic.com: Today I discovered that Red Hat Linux has created a new social networking site call Mugshot. This site is promoted as an “open source” site. I checked the site FAQ to find out that all the software powering Mugshot is, in fact, open source. And indeed it is.

The Internet must not be proprietary

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Dana Blankenhorn: There is an important lesson which can be drawn as a string through a host of recent stories, from Comcast and Cox Cable throttling BitTorrent to Verizon doing the SiteFinder thing to depredations concerning the iPhone and open spectrum.

Happy 30th Birthday Internet

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cafe.elharo.com: The Internet is 30 today. Exactly 30 years ago today on November 22, 1977 the first three networks were connected to become the Internet.

Cmdr Taco: At 10-Years Old, Slashdot Continues To Play A Role

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informationweek.com/blog: It's been ten years since Slashdot emerged from Rob Malda's personal Chips & Dip site. Also known by his Slashdot signature, Cmdr Taco, Malda had an interest in developments outside the computer department at the college and started posting newsy items to his personal site on early pieces of open source code, such as Linux, little known at the time.

How Not to Treat Your Readership

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Linux
Web

Linux Today: Today I read an article that so completely blew my mind in its audacity. The article in question is actually the final part of a five-part series of blog entries on InfoWorld, entitled "Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks." I read Kennedy's final piece in the series, and realized that some of us, myself included, were suckers in a game designed to make Linux advocates look foolish.

The GIMP screenshot monstrosity.

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pinderkent.blogsavy: GIMP 2.4 was recently released. One of the first things I went to check out after reading of the release was the screenshots section of their web page. I have to say, it was a very disappointing experience.

Linux Projects' Best Kept Secret

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Web
-s

On-Disk.com gives developers and projects an outlet for cdrom and DVD disk distribution while also allowing them to earn some much needed resources to further their work. Webpath Technologies, the parent company of On-Disk.com, is proud and excited to report that they have paid out over 21,000 USD to Linux and software projects.

The SourceForge Story

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datamation: It was the fall of 1999 and there was a fever in the air. The dotcom frenzy was in full bonanza, it was gonzo, and it was going to last forever.

Red Hat Linux in professional portal push

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Linux
Web

daniweb: Red Hat has opened a dedicated online resource for its partners around the globe, giving them access to the product, program, pricing and training information on both Red Hat and JBoss solutions and services from one single location which is localized in the Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean and Spanish languages.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.