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Browsers (Mozilla, Google)

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Google
Moz/FF
Web

Browsers (Mozilla, Google)

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Web

CMS News

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OSS
Web

WordPress now powers 25% of the Web

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Server
OSS
Web

One in four websites is now powered by WordPress.

Today is a big day for the free and open-source content management system (CMS). To be perfectly clear, the milestone figure doesn’t represent a fraction of all websites that have a CMS: WordPress now powers 25 percent of the Web.

The latest data comes from W3Techs, which measures both usage and market share: “WordPress is used by 58.7% of all the websites whose content management system we know. This is 25.0% of all websites.” While these numbers naturally fluctuate over the course of the month, the general trend for WordPress has been slow but steady growth.

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Open source intelligence techniques and the Dark Web

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OSS
Web

Techniques like Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) gathering and a proper understanding of the Dark Web is the first step in combating the Internet’s dark places. With an understanding of how to use open source encrypted anonymity services safely, organisations can explore OSINT sources – which include web-based communities, user-generated content, social-networking sites, wikis, blogs and news sources – to investigate potential threats or analyse relevant information for business purposes.

Whether that’s using Deep and Dark web sites and directories to support intelligence gathering for investigation purposes, manage incidents or to combat cyber crime.

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Apache HTTP Server Adds HTTP/2 Support for Speed and Security

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OSS
Web

Apache HTTP Server, the open source web server that controls around half of the market, has become the latest platform to support HTTP/2, a major security- and efficiency-focused revision of the protocol computers use to download information from the web.

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The world needs open source routers

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OSS
Web
  • The world needs open source routers
  • Internet daddy Vint Cerf blasts FCC's plan to ban Wi-Fi router code mods

    Vinton Cerf has added his name to a campaign begging the FCC to scrap plans to ban custom firmware on Wi-Fi routers and other wireless devices.

  • Have your say on the FCC's plan to lock down WiFi routers

    You may know that you can replace your WiFi router's software with an open source version like DD-WRT or Tomato to make it more secure or powerful. However, the US wireless regulator (FCC) only seems to have figured that out recently, and is not happy with your ability to boost the signal power excessively on such devices. As such, it proposed changes to regulations, with one document suggesting it may ban or restrict third-party software altogether. That caught the eye of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which created an online petition asking the FCC to make changes.

    The EFF petition says that "router manufacturers are notoriously slow about updating their software -- even with critical security fixes on the way. Under the FCC's proposal, you could have no alternative to running out-of-date and vulnerable firmware." It's referring, in part, to an FCC demand that manufacturer's "describe in detail how the device is protected from 'flashing' and the installation of third-party firmware such as DD-WRT."

  • Technology Community Responds to FCC Rules Banning WiFi Router Firmware Modification
  • FCC Should Mandate Open Source Router Firmware And Fast Security Updates, Say Internet Experts
  • 260 'Net Experts Urge FCC to Embrace Open, Transparent RF Rules

    A coalition of 260 leading Internet technology experts are warning the FCC to tread carefully when it comes to updated FCC rules governing RF devices. In a filing (pdf) with the FCC, experts like Vint Cerf (co-creator of the TCP-IP protocol) and Dave Farber (former Chief Technologist of the FCC) warn the agency that the FCC's latest proposal for updated RF device guidance, as currently written, could potentially make the Internet slower, less secure and prevent users from maintaining and modifying devices they own.

Best Web Browsers for the Linux Desktop

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Linux
Web

If there was one software category where Linux has the most abundance, it's the great selection of web browsers available. In this article, I'll share what I believe to be the best web browsers available for the Linux desktop.

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Google (GOOG) Releases Faster Mobile Web Browsing In New Open-Source Initiative With Twitter And 38 News Organizations

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Google
OSS
Web
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries
    A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. However, if your project doesn't justify the cost of implementing a traditional CDN, the use of an open source CDN may be more suitable. Typically, these types of CDNs allow you to link to popular web-based libraries (CSS/JS frameworks, for example), which are then delivered to your web visitors from the free CDN's servers. Although CDN services for open source libraries do not allow you to upload your own content to their servers, they can help you accelerate libraries globally and improve your website's redundancy.
  • Users stand up, speak out, and deliver data on OpenStack growth
    Last week, the OpenStack Foundation announced the results of its ninth user survey. OpenStack users responded in record-breaking numbers to participate, and their voices as revealed in the data tell the real story of OpenStack. The OpenStack community is growing, thriving with new users, deployments, code contributions, and collaborations, all on the rise. User diversity is expanding across geographies and organizational sizes. And OpenStack's ability to integrate with innovative technologies is paving the way for advancements not even dreamed of just five years ago.
  • How to get started learning to program

Huawei, Google supercharge Android with new Raspberry Pi-like board

Prepare to run Android at blazing fast speeds on a new Raspberry Pi-like computer developed by Huawei. Huawei's HiKey 960 computer board is priced at US$239 but has some of the latest CPU and GPU technologies. Google, ARM, Huawei, Archermind, and LeMaker all played roles in developing the board. The HiKey 960 is meant to be a go-to PC for Android or a tool to develop software and drivers for the OS. The board development was backed by Linaro, an organization that develops software packages for the Android OS and ARM architecture. Read more

Debian Derivatives: Q4OS and Devuan

  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.8.4 Operating System Lets Users Select Alternative Desktops
    Today, April 26, 2017, the developers behind the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution announced the release of the fourth stability and security update of the Q4OS 1.8 "Orion" series. Q4OS 1.8.4 comes almost two months after the release of the previous point release, and besides incorporating all the security patches backported from the upstream repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, it adds an exciting new feature, namely the integration of alternative desktop environments.
  • Which is Free, Which is Open … [Also]

    Devuan and Debian need not defer to the Open Source Initiative regarding what is Open Source, since the OSI is just using Debian's Free Software Guidelines. Debian's Free Software Guidelines are a definition of Free Software, not specifically Open Source. At the time they were created, RMS personally approved of them as "a good definition of Free Software".

Leftovers: Software

  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).
  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder
    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows. SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.
  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites
    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click. It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.
  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.