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Kernel.org breach does not reflect well on admins

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

itwire.com: Seventeen days. That how long it took for the elite administrators at the Linux kernel project to find out that servers at the project had been breached.

Linux Kernel Host Kernel.org Breached

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

readwriteweb.com: The site that hosts the Linux kernel's source code, Kernel.org was compromised earlier this month. The discovery was made on August 28th, and steps are being taken now to enhance security for the site and recovery is underway.

Also: The Cracking of Kernel.org by Jon Corbet

Does your web feel faster today?

Filed under
Web

extremetech.com: Starting today, a simple but effective switch has been flipped on DNS servers across the world that should significantly decrease your page load times and increase your download speeds across the web.

Rob "CmdrTaco" Malda Resigns From Slashdot

Filed under
Web

slashdot.org: After 14 years and over 15,000 stories posted, it's finally time for me to say Good-Bye to Slashdot. I created this place with my best friends in a run down house while still in college. Since then it has grown to be read by more than a million people.

Excellent Ways of Watching TV on Your Linux Desktop

Filed under
Web

junauza.com: Thanks to the Internet, a lot of native as well as web applications have come up that make sure that you watch your favorite shows at the time and place you want. Here's a list.

20 Years Ago Today: The First Website Is Published

Filed under
Web

wired.com: It was August 6, 1991, at a CERN facility in the Swiss Alps, when 36-year-old physicist Tim Berners-Lee published the first-ever website. It was, not surprisingly, a pretty basic one.

20 years of the Web

Filed under
Web

zdnet.com: The Internet of 1991 was text-based, used almost entirely by techies, and looked nothing like what you think of as the Internet. The Web changed all of that.

Flashback: The Future of the Web 1995-Style

Filed under
Web

webmonkey.com: Sometimes though it’s good to take a step back and remember that no one knows what the future of the web will really look like. In fact most predictions turn out to be utterly wrong. In that spirit, here’s a 1995 piece from MTV on this crazy thing called the Internet.

Governance and scarcity.

Filed under
Linux
Web

spevack.wordpress: Most of the time that we see contentious debate come up in the Fedora Project is when the community is trying to create, or agree on, the governance or process by which a scarce resource is used or allocated.

SUSE & Patent FUD: Who Do We Boycott Now?

Filed under
Microsoft
Web
SUSE

fossforce.com: Now that Microsoft and SUSE have announced they plan to continue sleeping together, I wonder if the folks at Techrights are rethinking their plans to pull the plug on Boycott Novell?

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LinuxCon and CloudOpen 2014 Keynote Videos Available

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Another great experience in Fedora bug reporting: Wine font fix solves my web-browsing problem

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