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Run Linux Destop Sessions In A Web Browser With Icebergs

Filed under
Linux
Web

Icebergs is a start-up that’s offering a cloud service that lets you run Linux desktop sessions in a web browser using HTML5. The goal is to allow programming work to be done on any machine without having to install Linux every time.

The pay-as-you-go service runs Ubuntu Linux with an Xfce desktop environment for a fast and lightweight experience in the browser. It offers root access so you can install the software you need. The service is also optimised for touch screen devices so you can even use it on a small smartphone screen if you so desire.

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Acquia Funding Tops $173M as Drupal 8 Release Nears

Filed under
Drupal
Web

While the open source Drupal content management system (CMS) is freely available, there is money to be made in support and services. This is where Acquia, the lead commercial vendor behind Drupal, comes into play.

Acquia today announced a new $55 million Series G equity financing round, with investors Centerview Capital Technology, New Enterprise Associates (NEA) and Split Rock Partners.

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Startup Lets Users Run Ubuntu with Xfce in Their Web Browsers

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Linux in the web browser is not a new concept to us, especially because even Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu Linux, has an Online tour of their computer operating system, which users can always try for free at http://tour.ubuntu.com/en/.

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FCC: Open source router software is still legal—under certain conditions

Filed under
OSS
Web
Legal

With the Federal Communications Commission being criticized for rules that may limit a user’s right to install open source firmware on wireless routers, we’ve been trying to get more specifics from the FCC about its intentions.

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Disney “Linux Light Bulb” home networking is not just for toys

Filed under
Linux
Web

Disney Research has demonstrated an LED-to-LED networking method whereby toys, wearables, mobile devices, and IoT gizmos could communicate with one another.

Disney Research has demonstrated an LED-to-LED “Linux Light Bulb” networking technology that would let toys communicate with each other, thereby bringing us one step closer to the reality of Disney/Pixar’s Toy Story. Instead of lip-syncing to the voice of Tom Hanks, however, Woody would argue with Buzz Lightyear with a flash of his eyes.

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Also: WiFi, Move Over - Here Comes LiFi

Google Chrome 46 Enters Beta with Flexible Animations, Optimized Image Loading

Filed under
Google
Web

After announcing the promotion of the Google Chrome 45 web browser to the stable channel on September 1, Google pushed earlier today, September 2, the Chrome 46 web browser to the Beta channel for testers worldwide.

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Midori 0.5.11 Open-Source Web Browser Adds Support for Client Side Decorations

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

Christian Dywan has announced the immediate availability for download of the eleventh maintenance release of the Midori 0.5 open-source web browser used by default in numerous lightweight GNU/Linux distributions, including elementary OS.

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How open source will power tomorrow’s tech unicorns

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web

With open source technology already powering business like Facebook, Google and Booking.com – and 70% of new apps – will it be the backbone of the next wave of unicorns?

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Keep Dream of a Free and Open Internet Alive, Black Hat Keynoter Urges

Filed under
OSS
Security
Web

Black Hat keynoter Jennifer Granick, director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, discusses the need for legal and policy change to defend Internet freedom.

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Most popular web browsers among Fedora users

Filed under
Red Hat
Web

Google Chrome is the most popular browser in the world. It is so popular that some call it a new Internet Explorer. But that’s based on global stats. In Red Hat, I’m responsible for web browsers, so I wondered what are the most popular web browsers among Fedora users. So I asked through Fedora accounts on Facebook and Google+: “Which browser do you use the most in Fedora?”

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More in Tux Machines

Debian 9 Review: Stable Like Ever, Better Than Most

Debian is one of the oldest and most famous Linux distributions of all time. Its development started back in 1993 by its founder Ian Murdock who passed away in 2015. It’s also known to be the mother-distribution of tens of other Linux distributions such as Ubuntu. Debian has a strict policy on software packages. It only ships free software by default. It doesn’t even ship non-free firmware and drivers. If you want, you can enable the non-free package repository later to install those packages. But you won’t find it there by default. Debian is well-known for its stability. They don’t ship new updates to users unless it was tested. Which is why you may notice some very old package versions when using Debian. It’s correct that they are old, but they are also tested and secure. Most discovered vulnerabilities get patched in Debian in a matter of hours or few days. Those users who would like to get latest and most updated software could switch to using the testing or unstable branch. Both contain more modern software according to a different policy. The effort which is being done by the Debian project for each release is huge. Currently, they offer 25000 source packages and 51000 binary packages. Getting all of those software from upstream projects, packaging them, testing them, debugging issues and fixing them is definitely not something you hear about everyday. Read more Also: Upgrade to Debian Stretch - GlusterFS fails to mount New: VOYAGER 9 Debian Stretch

Liri – Loves me, loves me not … at all

What does the world of Linux need more? Desktop environments? Nope. Ah, well, you’d be surprised, because a fresh new challenger appears! Its name is Liri, and it is the presentation layer for the namesake operating system being baked in the forges of community creativity as we speak. Sounds potentially interesting, but then we must be wary. I’ve trawled through the obscure, uncharted waters of Budgie, Razor-Qt and more recently, and with much greater attention to detail, LXQt, and in all of these cases, I was left rather dissatisfied with the end product. Not enough cohesion, quality, future roadmap, and most importantly, the finesse that you expect from polished, professional products. Then again, building a desktop environment is a huge undertaking, probably even more complex than spinning a new distro, and so, it’s not a coincidence that there are few serious contenders in this space. But Liri comes with enticing artwork, a promise of Material Design for the desktop, and so here we are, trying to get the first feel of what it does. Read more

Microsoft Breaches and Their Impact

Essential Applications for GNU/Linux Users

So, you’ve made the switch from Windows or MacOSX to GNU/Linux, congratulations! There is a good chance that you’ve also installed a distribution like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, or perhaps Manjaro; and so you have a wide range of software already installed. However, There are a number of applications that don’t always ship by default, that I feel every user should have or at least be aware of, and some that people have by default but have not ventured to use; so I thought a list of essential applications was in order! Read more