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Humor

Bringing self-driving cars to NASCAR

Filed under
Google
Humor
  • Bringing self-driving cars to NASCAR
  • Begin your quest with Google Maps 8-bit for NES
  • Google celebrated with Google doodle

Torvalds Awards Arch The Most User-Friendly

Filed under
Linux
Humor

muktware.com: Arch Linux has won the Free Software Award for the Most Consumer Friendly Linux Distribution. Aaron Griffin recieved the award from Richard M. Stallman and Linus Torvalds at the LibrePlanet conference at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Justin Bieber Linux ‘Biebian’ Becomes The Most Popular

Filed under
Linux
Humor

techlaze.com: It’s not just teenage girls who are swept away by ‘bieber fever’, apparently Linux, the open-source operating system is the newest entrant to the overflowing list of beliebers.

Leaked: Microsoft Office 2013 For Linux Screenshot

Filed under
Humor

thepowerbase.com: Last night at 1:30am EST, we received a surprise tip from faithful reader Chaucer. Chaucer will not reveal his true identity for obvious reasons, though he does want to make it known that this screenshot was leaked from Microsoft’s Canterbury campus.

Richard Stallman To Launch His Own Fashion Line

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Humor

techlaze.com: After making massive neckbeards a universal style statement, Richard Stallman, revered software freedom activist and computer programmer, has turned to the world of fashion. His new collection, titled RMS, is a luxury line of clothing specially designed for geeks and programmers.

Xfce's Early April Fool's Joke

Filed under
Software
Humor

ostatic.com: I saw a post on the Xfce blog Tuesday or Wednesday about changing versioning scheme of the next Xfce release. I saved the URL knowing that I'd want to write about it. Just thank goodness that a storm blew in and caused my computer to shut off. Otherwise, I might have never seen the Update 2. Dirty rats!

Linux from Scratch: I’ve had it up to here!

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Linux
Humor

thelinuxexperiment.com: As you may be able to tell from my recent, snooze-worthy technical posts about compilers and makefiles and other assorted garbage, my experience with Linux from Scratch has been equally educational and enraging.

“I’m a Beefy Miracle” song

Filed under
Linux
Humor

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: Beefy Miracle was chosen as the release name for the May 2012 edition of Fedora. Being a man of my word, here is my version of the song.

Top 10 Runlevels for Windows 8

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

fossforce.com: You heard the news, we’re sure, that Ballmer & Company unveiled a preview of Windows 8 this week. We FOSS types couldn’t help but notice that the upcoming Windows operating system mimics the penguin.

DtO: Every Linux desktop user can identify...

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Linux
Humor

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.