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Legal

Mad Max Mayhem

Filed under
Movies
Legal

Police are reported to have arrested eleven Mad Max movie fans as they tried to perform a scene from the second film, Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior, where outlaws chase down a fuel tanker.

Open source wins court victory

Filed under
OSS
Legal

A German court agreed with a Linux programmer's contention that Fortinet, a US security appliance maker, must comply with the terms of the General Public License.

Injunction Granted Against M$

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Alacritech Inc. today announced a U.S. District Court ruling for preliminary injunction against M$ preventing them from making, using, offering for sale, selling, importing or inducing others to use Microsoft's "Chimney" TCP offload architecture.

Music Group to Sue Students Over Downloads

Filed under
Legal

The Recording Industry Association of America, the trade group for the largest labels, said it will file federal lawsuits Wednesday against 405 students at 18 colleges with access to the Internet2 network. The Motion Picture Association of America said it will file an unspecified number of lawsuits against Internet2 users.

Apple bloggers get press support

Filed under
Mac
Legal

Eight US newspapers and the Associated Press agency have thrown their support behind three bloggers sued by Apple.

Microsoft Settles to Gateway $150 Million

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft Corp., the world's biggest software maker, agreed to pay personal-computer company Gateway Inc. $150 million over four years to resolve antitrust claims.

And in other M$ legal news: Microsoft files eight lawsuits over counterfeiting.

After four months home confinement, reporter has no regrets

Filed under
Legal

The boredom was worse than reporter Jim Taricani expected during his four month home confinement sentence for protecting a source. Too much TV watching, house cleaning and reading left him looking for ways to kill time, and appreciating the freedom he'd taken for granted.

The newsman was sentenced in December after being found in criminal contempt for refusing to give up his source. Taricani is one of several journalists nationwide who have become locked in First Amendment battles with the government over confidential sources.

Judge Sentences Spammer to Nine Years

Filed under
Security
Legal

A Virginia judge sentenced a spammer to nine years in prison Friday in the nation's first felony prosecution for sending junk e-mail, though the sentence was postponed while the case is appealed.

High-powered business coalition backs EU commission against Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A five-member coalition of high-tech heavyweights, including IBM, Oracle and Nokia, has thrown its weight behind the European Commission in its anti-trust court battle with US software giant Microsoft, the group's lawyer said.

Former Microsoft employee sentenced two years

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A former Microsoft worker was sentenced Friday to two years in prison and ordered to pay $5 million in restitution after he admitted reselling software he stole from the company and using the money to pay off his mortgage, among other things.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.