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Legal

GPL-Violator Allwinner Joins The Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
Legal

Allwinner Technology is the Chinese company producing a range of low-end SoCs for Android tablets and other devices. Allwinner hardware is popular with many in the open-source community due to their SoCs appearing in lower-cost hardware and the thriving Linux-SunXi community. Unfortunately, Allwinner as a company is still "learning" to be open-source friendly and to not violate the GPL and other licenses.

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews François Marier, creator of Libravatar

Filed under
GNU
Legal

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with François Marier, a free software developer from New Zealand. He is the creator and lead developer of Libravatar. In addition to his passion for decentralization, he contributes to the Debian project and volunteers on the FSF licensing team.

Libravatar is a free network service providing profile photos for a number of Web sites, including bugs.debian.org and git.kernel.org. Its flexible architecture allows end users to host their own images and allows Web sites to use Gravatar as a fallback when necessary. It is licensed under the GNU Affero General Public License version 3, or end user can opt for any later version (GNU AGPLv3+).

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Conservancy Seeks Your Questions on GPL Enforcement

Filed under
GNU
Legal

Historically, Conservancy has published extensive materials about enforcement of the GPL, including blog posts, announcements regarding compliance actions, many sections appearing in the definitive Copyleft Guide (a joint initiative with the Free Software Foundation). After Conservancy's recent announcement of its funding of Christoph Hellwig's lawsuit against VMware, Conservancy has sought to answer as many questions as possible about GPL enforcement.

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Trade agreement could prohibit open source code supply

Filed under
OSS
Legal

An international trade agreement under negotiation with Australia, the United States, the European Union and others may have wide-ranging implications for the technology users, according to civil liberties groups.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has analysed leaked drafts of texts for the Trade In Services Agreement (TISA) written in February this year, and claims it would prohibit countries involved from forcing vendors to disclose source code used for applications in their equipment.

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Relicensing Dolphin: The long road to GPLv2+

Filed under
GNU
Legal

Since its resurfacing as an open source project in 2008, Dolphin has been licensed under the GNU General Public License version 2 (GPLv2). This license, created in 1991, is still a fairly common license used in the open source world. But as with anything that deals with technology, times are changing at a rapid rate. More recent projects are using GNU Public License version 3 and Apache 2.0, for their additional freedoms, protections from outside liability, and improved inter-license compatibility. Unfortunately these newer licenses are not compatible with GPLv2, and any project using these licenses cannot link to Dolphin and thus, Dolphin cannot link to them.

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Oracle v. Google: We're not screwed yet

Filed under
Android
Google
Legal

Superficially, the Solicitor General's advice to SCOTUS to find against Google and reject its appeal looks like bad news. But there are some substantial straws to grasp

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Related: Let Oracle own APIs, Justice Dept tells top court in surprise filing

Obama administration asks U.S. top court to decline Google copyright appeal

Allwinner Publishes New CedarX Open-Source Code

Filed under
OSS
Legal

For months now Allwinner has been violating the GPL and have attempted to cover it up by obfuscating their code and playing around with their licenses while jerking around the open-source community. At least today they've made a positive change in open-sourcing more of their "CedarX" code.

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Two hackers who committed suicide and no one still knows the real reason why

Filed under
Development
Legal
Obits

Two of world’s most wanted hackers had committed suicide and no one still knows why. Aaron Swartz and Jonathan James, both hackers by profession and most wanted by the FBI have committed suicide in face of the federal investigation against their hacking crimes.

Interested thing is both hackers were not connected to each other in any way but were being tried for hacking by the same department and the case was being overseen by the same Assistant United States Attorney Stephen Heymann. Could this have any hand in their suicides.

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SPDX v2 simplifies open source license dependency tracking

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS
Legal

The Linux Foundation has updated its SPDX standard to v2.0, enhancing the ability to track complex open source license dependencies to ensure compliance.

The Linux Foundation (LF) released version 1.0 of the Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) standard in 2011, promoting it as a common format for sharing data about software licenses and copyrights. Now the LF’s SPDX workgroup has released version 2.0 of the standard, with new features that let you relate SPDX documents to each other to provide a “three-dimensional” relationship view of license dependencies.

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Why doesn't the FSF release GPG-signed copies of its licenses?

Filed under
GNU
Legal

While verified copies of our licenses can be useful, this is unfortunately a project that sounds straightforward at first, but all the corner cases found in the wild muck it up.

One relatively frequent request we receive is for the FSF to provide GPG-signed copies of our licenses. GPG is a tool that lets users cryptographically sign or encrypt documents and emails. A GPG-signed document lets anyone who receives it know that they have received the exact same document as the one that was signed. By providing signed documents, users will be able to easily ensure that they have received an unmodified copy of the license along with their software. It's also possible that some system of signing the documents could help projects tracking the use and adoption of various free software licenses. Providing these signed documents is a simple task: run a command and publish the documents. A trivial investment of resources, or at least that is how it appears at first.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux Devices

  • How does the PocketCHIP compare to the Raspberry Pi?
    When the Raspberry Pi hit the tech scene, it made a huge impact. It wasn't the first tiny computer, by any means—the Chumby, the PogoPlug, and other hackable systems on chips preceded it—but there hadn't been anything quite so intentionally open and affordable as the Pi. You didn't have to hack the Pi, you just put an OS on an SD card, booted, and you were running an open source computer. The computer you were running only used a dozen watts of power, and it wasn't encased in a bulky plastic body that would end up in the landfill when you decided to upgrade.
  • LibreELEC 8.0.0 Officially Released for Raspberry Pi SBCs with Kodi 17 "Krypton"
    The development team behind the open-source LibreELEC operating system for Raspberry Pi and other embedded devices proudly announced today, February 22, 2017, the release and general availability of LibreELEC 8.0.0. Dubbed Krypton, LibreELEC 8.0.0 has been in development since early October last year, during which it received over 200 nightly builds, no less than ten official Alpha versions, and a total of three Beta releases. It's built around the recently released Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center, so you'll enjoy all of its cool new features.
  • Tiny, rugged, fanless mini-PC runs Linux on quad-core Bay Trail
    ADL Embedded Solutions unveiled a tiny rugged mini-PC with quad- or dual-core Atom E3800 SoCs, HD video, 2x GbE, wide DC input, and -40 to 70°C temps. A couple of months ago, San Diego-based ADL Embedded Solutions unveiled a compact ADLE3800SEC single-board computer, featuring quad- and dual-core Atom E3800 processors and based on a new, 75 x 75mm “Edge-Connect” SBC form-factor. Now, the company has built a rugged, 86 x 81 x 33mm “ADLEPC-1500” mini-PC around it.
  • Understanding the Second Phone: That is Now Almost Always Also a Smartphone
    As I am finishing the new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 edition, as always when looking at the data, I am noticing patterns. Ones that catch my eye are the exceptions. Where a given trend line does not conform to the overall industry growth curves. The 'second phone' fits this pattern. It is 'bucking the trend'. I have been reporting on second phones on this blog and in my books for ages and I have been asking for industry analysts to go measure their count. This is still a murky area for which very little data exists but we can estimate its size reasonably well if we take the total population of phones in use, and subtract the number of mobile phone owners who report having at least one active mobile phone and account. So the current numbers fresh from the TomiAhonen Almanac 2017, tell us that the world has 5.15 Billion unique mobile phone users (owners) - this is a number that increasingly is now also reported by others like Ericsson, Cisco and the GSM Association; and I did the comparison of this data point earlier this week to see how valid it is. (It is very valid).
  • FLOSS Weekly 422: Arduino Update

Ubuntu Leftovers: Augmented Reality Helmets With Ubuntu, Ubuntu 17.10 Plans

  • [VIDEO] Mortenson Talks about How Daqri Smart Helmet Puts BIM Advantages on the Job [Ed: Ubuntu-based]
    Los Angeles-based AR specialist Daqri appears to have made a next-gen breakthrough with the latest version of its Smart Helmet, which was joined earlier this month by a new sister product, Smart Glasses. Daqri unveiled the latter device in Las Vegas at the annual Consumer Electronics Show, which this year featured a raft of new AR products from several manufacturers. Architects are among the market targets for the lightweight Smart Glasses.
  • Skanska UK to test Daqri augmented reality-enabled hard hats
  • Ubuntu-Powered Robots and Augmented Reality Helmets to Be Showcased at MWC 2017
    As expected, Canonical will be present once again at the MWC (Mobile World Congress) event this year, where the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system will showcase its latest innovations. MWC 2017 is taking place first thing next week, between February 27 and March 2, and we've been informed earlier by Canonical that they are currently finalizing arrangements for their presence at the world's largest gathering for the mobile industry, at stand 3k31 in Hall P3.
  • Ubuntu 17.10 to Ship with Nautilus 3.24 File Manager, without Type-Ahead Search
    Ubuntu GNOME's Jeremy Bicha is announcing today that the soon-to-be-released Nautilus 3.24 file manager will be implemented in the Ubuntu 17.10 operating system, whose development will start in late April this year. It's a known fact that Ubuntu is always shipping with an older Nautilus version because Canonical always includes some patches to offer certain functionality to users. And it looks like these patches need to be updated every time a new Nautilus version is out, though some of them have failed to work do to the file manager's constant refactoring.

Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

I am happy to inform you that Qt 5.9 Alpha has been released today. Qt 5.9 Alpha is an important milestone on our way to the final Qt 5.9.0 release, which is targeted to be released by the end of May 2017. The Alpha release is available only as source packages. Binary installers will be available via the online installer in conjunction with the Beta release as well as development snapshots during the coming weeks. Read more