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Legal

Microsoft sued over alleged Xbox 360 glitch

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Legal

A Chicago man who bought Microsoft Corp.'s new Xbox 360 has sued the world's largest software maker, saying the new video game console has a design flaw that causes it to overheat and freeze up.

Intel sues Intell over Intel

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Legal

CHIP GIANT Intel is taking legal action in a California court against a firm called Intell Detection Systems.

Grokster quits file-sharing fight

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Legal

File-sharing group Grokster has agreed to halt distributing its software to settle a long-running copyright case launched by the entertainment industry.

AMD Describes Antitrust Strategy

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Legal

Thomas McCoy sat down with IDG News Service to outline the basic nature of the case against Intel, and provided an early glimpse of the strategy AMD intends to employ against Intel at trial.

SCO demands mysterious Linux 2.7 info

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Legal

THE BRAINIACS on SCO's legal team have done it again. They are demanding IBM hand over its materials about the Linux 2.7 kernel.

Fundamentals of Copyright Law

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Legal

The phrase "open source license" refers to a large number of agreements that license the copyrights inherent in software widely, fairly, and with the fewest restrictions possible. This article -- the first of two -- describes the tenets of copyright and explains the intents of an open source license.

Linux lawyers offer developers free support

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Legal

The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC), provider of pro bono legal services to protect and advance free and open source software, today announced the expansion of its operations with the appointment of two additional lawyers.

Open-Source Software Licenses Present Quagmire

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OSS
Legal

There are four "classic" open-source licenses, although many other open-source licenses have been created. Currently, there are 58 open-source licenses approved by OSI. This article will address the legal and practical risks that users of open-source software might face.

AMD is being Sued

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Legal

A CASE WAS FILED by Tessera alleging that AMD and its Spansion subsidiary have breached its patents.

ATI founder cleared

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Legal

ATI founder and chairman Kwok Yuen Ho, and his wife, Betty Ho, have been cleared of insider trading allegations in a stinging defeat for Canada's major stock market regulator.

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