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Legal

M$ Sues Over Android/Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

mrpogson.com: M$ is suing folks for using Android/Linux to make a few dollars and to annoy people.

Lime Wire, music publishers settle copyright case

Filed under
Legal

reuters.com: The operator of LimeWire, a once-popular file-sharing service shut down last year for copyright infringement, has settled a lawsuit brought by music publishers.

Red Hat joins push against software patents

Filed under
Linux
Legal

businesswire.com (PR): Red Hat, Inc. has continued its efforts to improve the U.S. patent system and to challenge poor quality software patents. Red Hat joined a large group of companies in an amicus brief to the Supreme Court which explained that the burden of proof applied to invalidate patents impedes innovation and should be changed.

Artists should be paid, Part 3: The Big Picture

Filed under
Legal

Can artists actually make money on a free software driven free culture project? Having established the motivations and the basic principles in the first two parts, I’m going to look at the big picture here:

Sony takes legal action against PS3 hackers

Filed under
Legal

h-online.com: On their web sites, George Hotz, who became known for his iPhone and PS3 hacks, and the fail0verflow hacker group, have published three statements of complaint made by legal representatives of Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) against Hotz and four alleged members of fail0verflow at the District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco.

I Figured Out What to Explain to You Next: Bylaws

Filed under
SUSE
Legal
  • So. What Now?
  • Dear PJ: Please Don't Quit Groklaw
  • I Figured Out What to Explain to You Next: Bylaws -- And a Word to the OpenSUSE Guys

Red Hat to pay $20 million

Filed under
Linux
Legal
  • Red Hat to pay $20 million to settle lawsuit
  • Red Hat’s New Strategies For Enterprise And SMB

Red Hat’s Secret Patent Deal

Filed under
Linux
Legal

gigaom.com: When patent troll Acacia sued Red Hat in 2007, it ended with a bang: Acacia’s patents were invalidated by the court, and all software developers, open-source or not, had one less legal risk to cope with. So, why is the outcome of Red Hat’s next tangle with Acacia being kept secret?

Playing DVDs in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software
Legal

pogson.6k.ca: We retain one XP machine here simply because it can play DVD videos. One can copy a DVD for personal use/backup so the encryption is not a matter of copyright but restriction on access and a means to extend copyright.

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