Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PCLOS

PCLinuxOS: Screenshot Showcase, PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotligh and Slipstream On PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: bliss

    Around 2011, I got serious and got a DSL line and started to download lots of distributions, but never found any I wanted to switch to until Mandriva went under and did not recover. I found PCLinuxOS around 2012.

    I also liked to read SF magazines, but they became too expensive after I had to retire from nursing. Now, I make extensive use of the San Francisco Public Library. I got interested in Japanese animation in the early 2000's then, due to that in Japanese comics called "Manga." I buy a few manga at low prices. To better understand the topics of the comics, I got interested in Japanese history and foods. I have read lots of books on Japanese history, ancient and modern.

    Why and when did you start using Linux?
    About 2006 when the Commodore Business Machines had gone under in 1994, I hoped forlornly that it would do the smart thing and start transitioning to the x86 processor architecture. One of my online friends suggested Mandriva, but could not get it together to send me copies. Another online friend took pity on me and sent me the Mandriva 2006 iso files on a DVD. I made the 6 CDs using Windows XP, created a partition on the Great Quality(not so great) laptop and installed Mandriva.

    I learned to use Knoppix as well from a book "Knoppix for Dummies". Shortly after starting with Mandriva, I joined SF-LUG to get help, principally with getting online with WiFi and repairing LiLo.

  • Slipstream On PCLinuxOS: Analysis

    If I were to define this game in one sentence, it would go something like this: A love letter to the arcade racers of the 80's (Outrun, Turbo Outrun, Outrunners, Top Gear and many others).

    Yes friends, the nostalgia is strong with this one, but it is not an empty nostalgia. Slipstream is inspired by the classics of the past, but it has enough personality to be original and fresh.

    The game was developed by Brazilian programmer Sandro Luiz de Paula, from Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, and the sound/music part by Stefan Moser, from Charleston, South Carolina.

    [...]

    Here we come to a very important point: There is no point in having great graphics and music, if the gameplay is lame. A pleasant surprise was the automatic detection of the joystick, without any additional configuration.

    The game is fast, exciting and leaves the player on the edge of his seat. So good is the animation in the game, that again, it is hard to believe that it was made in Java, due to the speed and quality of the game.

    Being able to play between four players on the same computer is a journey of nostalgia, to the time when children gathered in the homes of friends, to challenge them, whether it was at Super Mario Kart, or Top Gear (who doesn't remember?).

    Now, the controls are responsive, and the different tracks have their characteristics: rain, snow, desert, beach, which affects the control of the car, a very cool touch of realism.

    But, not everything is perfect: Special maneuvers, notably Drift and Slipstream are very difficult to do.

    The drift is done like this: Release the accelerator, touch the brake, and accelerator again. The problem is that this game mechanic is not intuitive: In all racing games, the drift is always done by pressing the hand brake, and, by slowing the acceleration a little, not with this confusing mechanic. It took me two days to do the drifts right.

    But worse is the slipstream, the maneuver that gives the game its name: This one, I never consciously managed, and it came out a few times, but alien to my will.

The February 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the February 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS Screenshot Showcase, Member Spotlight and Obituary for Sproggy

Filed under
PCLOS
Obits
  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: rgradle

    PCLinuxOS (KDE) is currently running on my desktop machine (ASUS m/b with AMD A10 processor), and on an HP laptop computer (AMD Phenom II/Mate). Performance on the desktop machine is great, but a bit slow on the laptop. I do some video editing for my church on the desktop machine using Kdenlive, a native Linux application that is very powerful. I also do some graphics development for the church using GIMP. Very powerful, but long learning curve with GIMP. Now I wish I had paid more attention to the GIMP articles that appeared in the PCLinuxOS magazine some time ago. I have a Windows 10 virtual machine on my desktop computer for a few applications that will not run under Linux. My wife, a Windows user from way back, was right at home on her KDE desktop in no time at all. When people try to tell me how complicated Linux is to use, I always bring up my my wife's experience as an example of how easy Linux, and especially PCLinuxOS, is to use.

    One of the things I always appreciate about PCLinuxOS is that the software is well thought out, meaning that the updates generally work well and without problem. This is really a nod to those to maintain the software in the repository. Thank you, thank you. Also, I always appreciate the help available on the forum. Even when I have made newbie errors, someone is always willing to provide direction to get me on the path forward. Just outstanding.

  • R.I.P, Sproggy! You Will Be Missed!

    On December 23, 2019, our beloved PCLinuxOS family member, Sproggy, lost his battle with cancer.

    [...]

    When I first joined the PCLinuxOS forum, Sproggy was a moderator. We both hit it off pretty early on. My interactions with him increased a lot when I took over the editor's role for the magazine. We would chat frequently -- usually daily -- in the magazine's IRC channel on FreeNode, then called #pclinuxos.mag (it's now #pclosmag).

    We would chat about everything and anything. We'd talk about family, politics (particularly anytime there was a General Election coming up in the U.K.), world events, personal trials and tribulations, work, what's for dinner, and sometimes just nonsense. There was hardly a topic we didn't touch on. At that time, the magazine's IRC channel was a hopping place. Joble, Hootiegibbon, CSolis, grnich, ms_meme, AndrezjL, Meemaw, myself and many others frequently hung out there. Sproggy would join in on the conversations with just about everyone.

The January 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the January 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The December 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites.

Read more

PCLinuxOS Articles of Interest

Filed under
PCLOS
  • Mind Your Step, Part 3

    On September 30th, Forever 21 filed bankruptcy and subsequently, all of its stores closed down. GameStop is predicted to be the next retailer to go.

    GameStop started out as Electronics Boutique back in the 1990s, which was itself spun off from Waldenbooks, of which it, competitor Borders and Builder's Square were purchased by K-Mart Corporation (pre-Sears)...and we all know what happened there. GameStop was spared its demise since it was spun off from Waldenbooks.

    I remember Electronics Boutique well, because not only did it sell video games and gaming consoles, but it also sold PC software. It is there where I purchased copies of Lotus Improv, Turbo Pascal for Windows and Turbo C++ for Windows. (I was running OS/2 at that time.)

    GameStop is still a functioning retailer, but for how long? Last time I was in a GameStop, they sold the major consoles and all the popular games. For a while, they were selling second hand iPhones and Android powered smartphones. Other than that, there is a 50/50 mix of new and used gaming hardware and software, including some PC-based titles that could run on Wine.

    At times, I would find a MS-DOS based title now and then, but even that is becoming a rarity. (A better source for MS-DOS titles would be a thrift store such as Goodwill.)

    What could ultimately kill GameStop would be the next generation of gaming consoles, which would require a high speed internet connection to function as all games would be online games (i.e. no CD/DVD/Blu-Ray discs needed). The currently available Sony PlayStation 4 largely depends on the Internet to function.

  • De-Googling Yourself

    Last month, we paused this series of articles to address Richard Stallman's departure from the FSF presidency. Now let's get back to our subject, which is to introduce alternative services to Google's.

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: rolgiati

    Why and when did you start using Linux?

    When: In the days when Slackware became available on the Walnut Creek CDROM (and not a stack of 20-odd 3.5" floppies). It must have been 1993 or 1994, when one had to buy Mosaic to surf the web, because there were no free browsers then

    Why: In four words "Blue Screen Of Death". Got fed up with the inadequacy of MS Windows, read about Linux, got the Slackware CD and was hooked. Later, I moved to Mandrake/Mandriva/Mageia, flirted with Debian (then Devuan when the Poettering Plague started spreading), and finally PCLOS where I rejoiced in finding again all the Drak/Drax tools I had been sorely missing in Debian/Devuan.

  • Screenshot Showcase
  • Special Drivers In PCLinuxOS, Part 1
  • Texstar Taking Care Of Business

The November 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS 2019.10 updated installation media release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS project has announced the release of updated installation media for PCLinuxOS. The new media carries the version number 2019.10 and contains a fully updated system as of October 15 2019. Please note it is not required to do a clean installation each month since PCLinuxOS is a rolling release. These ISOs are being provided so new users don’t have a large update to perform after installation from a dated ISO.

Read more

The October 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Devices: PicoCore, u‑blox and ESP32

  • PicoCore MX8MN is a Tiny NXP i.MX 8M Nano Computer-on-Module

    The PicoCore MX8MN Nano carries the NXP i.MX 8M Nano F&S Elektronik Systeme has announced the development of the smallest i.MX 8M based CoM yet: the PicoCore MX8MN Nano.

  • u-Blox Launches JODY-W3 WiFi 6 & Bluetooth 5.1 Module for Automotive Applications

    u‑blox has just launched JODY-W3 wireless module which the company claims to be the first automotive-grade WiFi 6 module. Apart from supporting 802.11ax WiFi with 2×2 MIMO, the module also comes with dual-mode Bluetooth 5.1 connectivity. WiFi 6 will be used for applications demanding higher bitrates such as ultra‑HD video infotainment streaming and screen mirroring, wireless back‑up cameras and cloud connectivity as well as vehicle systems maintenance and diagnostics. Bluetooth 5.1 will be used for keyless entry systems and other applications leveraging direction-finding and the longer range offered by the latest version of Bluetooth.

  • Barracuda App Server for ESP32 Let You Easily Develop Lua Apps via Your Web Browser

    We covered Real Time Logic’s open-source lightweight Minnow Server for microcontrollers last year, and now the company has released another project: Barracuda App Server for ESP32. This project is more complex and requires an ESP32 board with PSRAM to run such as boards based on ESP32-WROVER module with 4 to 8MB PSRAM. The Barracuda App server (BAS) comes with a Lua VM, and in complement with the LSP App Manager that facilitates active development on the ESP32 by providing a web interface. The Barracuda App Server runs on top of FreeRTOS real-time operating system part of Espressif free ESP-IDF development environment.

3-D Printing and Open Hardware: MakerBot, AAScan and RISC-V

  • MakerBot Targets Schools With Rebranded Printers

    MakerBot was poised to be one of the greatest success stories of the open source hardware movement. Founded on the shared knowledge of the RepRap community, they created the first practical desktop 3D printer aimed at consumers over a decade ago. But today, after being bought out by Stratasys and abandoning their open source roots, the company is all but completely absent in the market they helped to create. Cheaper and better printers, some of which built on that same RepRap lineage, have completely taken over in the consumer space; forcing MakerBot to refocus their efforts on professional and educational customers.

  • 3D-Printed 3D Scanner made to work with your phone

    An Arduino-based 3D scanner was created by an industrious 3D printing enthusiast and released open source this week for all to enjoy. This open source project was made to take out the most time-consuming component of the 3D scan process, giving said process instead to an Android phone combined with 3D-printed parts, a cheap motor, and an Arduino. This is not the first time such a system has been attempted, but it does appear to be the most complete and ready-to-roll system to date.

  • AAScan open source Arduino 3D scanner utilizes the power of your smartphone

    Using the power of Arduino and utilising the camera and powerful performance of a smartphone QLRO has created a fantastic 3D scanner aptly named the AAScan. Check out the video below to learn more about the Android 3D scanner which is open source and fully automated.

  • Video: RISC-V momentum around the world, from edge to HPC

    In this keynote talk from the 2020 HiPEAC conference, RISC-V Foundation Chief Executive Calista Redmond explains how the RISC-V open-source instruction set architecture is gathering momentum around the world, finding applications across the compute continuum from edge to high-performance computing.

  • Weekend Discussion: How Concerned Are You If Your CPU Is Completely Open?

    For some interesting Sunday debates in the forums, how important to you is having a completely open CPU design? Additionally, is POWER dead? This comes following interesting remarks by an industry leader this weekend. Stemming from discussions on Twitter about Raptor's new OpenBMC firmware with a web GUI in tow, one of the discussions ended up shifting to that of open CPU designs and the belief that secretive CPU startup NUVIA could be having an open-source firmware stack.

Security and FUD: SpaceX, NMap, Polyverse, MongoDB, NGINX and Kubernetes

  • All Those Low-Cost Satellites in Orbit Could Be Weaponized by Hackers, Warns Expert

    Last month, SpaceX became the operator of the world's largest active satellite constellation. As of the end of January, the company had 242 satellites orbiting the planet with plans to launch 42,000 over the next decade. This is part of its ambitious project to provide internet access across the globe. The race to put satellites in space is on, with Amazon, UK-based OneWeb and other companies chomping at the bit to place thousands of satellites in orbit in the coming months.

  • NMap - A Basic Security Audit of Exposed Ports and Services

    For a plethora of reasons, auditing the security of our servers and networks is of paramount importance. Whether we are talking about a development server, a workstation, or a major enterprise application, security should be baked into every step of the deployment. While we can easily check our firewall settings from “the inside” of our systems. It is also a good idea to run a security audit from "the outside”. Using a network enumeration tool such as the famous and highly vetted Network Mapper (NMap).

  • Cybersecurity startup Polyverse raises $8M to protect Linux open-source code from hackers [Ed: Right around the corner from Bill Gates, another company like Black Duck and it'll "protect" Linux... just buy its proprietary software]

    Polyverse has been validated by the U.S. Department of Defense for mitigating zero-day attacks, intrusions that occur just as a vulnerability becomes public, such as the infamous WannaCry ransomware and hacks of companies like Equifax. The company says its technology is “running on millions of servers.”

  • MongoDB: developer distraction dents DevSecOps dreams

    MongoDB’s director of developer relations has just opened a piece of internal research that suggests as few as 29% of Europe’s developers take full responsibility for security. Now, 29% is a somewhat arbitrary figure, cleary i.e. it could be 22.45% or it could be 39.93%… the fact that the firm has pointed to an exact sum in this way is merely intended to show that it has undertaken a degree of calculation and statistical analysis

  • NGINX Unit Adds Support for Reverse Proxying and Address-Based Routing

    NGINX announced the release of versions 1.13 and 1.14 of NGINX Unit, its open-source web and application server. These releases include support for reverse proxying and address-based routing based on the connected client's IP address and the target address of the request. NGINX Unit is able to run web applications in multiple language versions simultaneously. Languages supported include Go, Perl, PHP, Python, Node.JS, Java, and Ruby. The server does not rely on a static configuration file, instead allowing for configuration via a REST API using JSON. Configuration is stored in memory allowing for changes to happen without a restart.

  • Kubernetes Security Plagued by Human Error, Misconfigs

    Following a year of numerous security bugs within the Kubernetes ecosystem and the first security audit of Kubernetes conducted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which hosts the open source platform, continued wide-spread adoption has seen security become somewhat of an afterthought. However, if security concerns continue inhibiting business innovation, does that fall on businesses for neglecting security practices or the market for not providing them with the tools to confidently secure their deployments? “People just get security wrong sometimes,” McLean said. “Companies need a combination of increased learning, cross-pollination, new tooling, and updated processes to identify and remediate these security ‘mistakes’ during build and deploy vs. waiting for exposure during runtime.”

Contributing to KDE is easier than you think — Localization plain and simple

Today’s post will essentially describe how quick and easy it is to work with localization for KDE software. My latest post might have sounded intimidating or people might have gotten tired from reading it in the middle, which is a shame; hence the reason for this post. Oh, existing translators should also have a reason to read this post, as I’ll be showing brand new functionality in Lokalize too. As a brief note, I’m currently using openSUSE Krypton with Plasma from master, meaning it’s as updated as possible. I’m also using the XWayland session, because it’s dope af. It doesn’t affect my workflow at all, either. But well, let’s keep it short and begin. Read more