Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Interview and Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS
Interviews

Why and when did you start using Linux?
2005. The security issues with Windows XP were really blowing up at the time, so when I ordered a new computer for school I made sure to do so with a second drive planning on giving 'Nix a try. I started off on Ubuntu on that machine, and when I got a laptop a couple of years later I wanted to try something different and ran through a couple distros before settling on PCLinuxOS. It's become my everyday driver, and I now use Linux most of the time on my own machines simply because I like it better. I'm currently running Debian 10 and PCLinuxOS.

What specific equipment do currently use with PCLinuxOS?
This desktop has an AMD Ryzen 7 3800X, Radeon 580X graphics, Asus X570 mobo, and 64GB of G-Skill Ripjaws RAM. I also have a Nektar Impact GX61 MIDI controller keyboard and Focusrite Scarlett 4i4 audio interface connected to this machine since it's my production rig. I also have PCLinuxOS installed on a hand-me-down laptop (Lenovo Z580) that runs only Linux.

Do you feel that your use of Linux influences the reactions you receive from your computer peers or family? If so, how?
I'm not sure how much using Linux has to do with it, but I've certainly become the tech support for my family... Outside of a few die-hards, I find that folks generally aren't too hung up on what OS you use. I use Windows, MacOS, and Linux daily and think each has its place, though I'd likely never use Windows at all on my own boxes if WINE support for games and a few audio programs was better.

Read more

Also: [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase

The July 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The June 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the June 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS Screenshots, Shotcut, and Member Highlights

Filed under
PCLOS
  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • Finally! ShotCut Running On PCLinuxOS!

    Shotcut is a non-linear video editor, which I always wanted to use. But first, I would like to disclose my background with audio-visual production.

    I started making videos for YouTube, with PCLinuxOS, first with Openshot and all the tools that are available in PCLinuxOS repos: Audacity, Openshot, Rezsound, SSR and others.

    Openshot was my choice because it has a direct interface and is super simple to operate. In fact, Openshot is simple, but very complete. It has features that are not accessible right from the start, having to be activated, either through different menus or video clip properties. But, it shows the intelligence of the programmer, who decided not to scare his would be users with an intimidating interface.

    Then I started using VSDC, from the Windows platform, but thanks to Wine and Play-On_Linux, working perfectly on Linux, to add more effects and other capabilities with characters and fonts that Openshot doesn't have. VSDC also has a very clear and straightforward interface, and its resources are accessible through MS Office ribbon-style menus (now a well spread paradigm among several applications).

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: jzakiya

    What specific equipment do currently use with PCLinuxOS?
    2016 System76, Gazelle laptop, i7 cpu, 2.6 - 3.5 GHz, 16GB, 240 GB SSD, KDE5

    Do you feel that your use of Linux influences the reactions you receive from your computer peers or family? If so, how?
    None really, except people who I've converted from Windoze to PCLinuxOS.

    What would you like to see happen within PCLinuxOS that would make it a better place. What are your feelings?
    To keep current with new hardware/software. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is great. For Tex to keep as healthy as possible (I lost my partner to cancer 2017). For the community to remain/become more cohesive and tolerant (lots of past rancor about systemd, and dropping 32-bits). Appreciate the time we have, and use it wisely and productively.

  • Wallpaper Roundup, Revisited

    Looking through the Monthly Screenshots section of the PCLinuxOS forum, it's apparent that there are many individuals who know how to find great looking wallpapers for their desktops. But for others, finding high quality images for their desktops isn't so easy. Plus, with so many of us spending so much time at home, quarantined to help prevent the spread of coronavirus (or to help flatten the curve), it's inevitable that many will be spending an increasing amount of time on their computers. You might as well have some nice wallpaper to look at while spending all of that extra time in front of your computer.

    Let me help you with that. There are several places on the web where you can find high quality images for your desktops ... that are free! So, let's take a look at some of them.

    Before we start, though, let me give you one word of advice: be cautious! Collecting cool and unusual wallpapers can be a very addicting pursuit. It won't take long for you to wonder where all your hard drive space went!

The May 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the May 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS Screenshots and Member Highlights

Filed under
PCLOS

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: mutse

    I started with 'Linux' after reading a magazine with a DVD with a number of 'Linux distros' in it, after it was mentioned that Windows XP would no longer be supported and would no longer receive security updates. I also did so out of curiosity and as a new challenge, in my already richly filled career.

    I "hopped" from one distro to another and then, by chance, ended up at PCLinuxOS. I then registered on the Dutch forum (pclinuxos.nl) where I got a certain name, A.J. Baudrez (Wamukota), discovered and also read that he lived in Bruges (also read in the PCLinuxOS Magazine). After I contacted Alain, I was invited to come to the "Brutux" meeting(s). That's how I 'rolled' into that Linux world. I still go there every month.

    I am very happy that I have discovered PCLinuxOS (and Linux in general). I've already received a lot of help from DeBaas (both at the forum and personally in The Hague Netherlands, where he works as a volunteer in the computer club), also Alain and everyone here at the USA PCLinuxOS forum. Many thanks for that. I wish I had so much knowledge.

The April 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the April 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS: Horizon Chase Turbo, Screenshot Showcase, 'Tunnelrat', and Vintage Computing on PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
  • Racing Back To The Past: Horizon Chase Turbo On PCLinuxOS!

    Well, after this introduction, I will analyze the game running on PCLinuxOS. As it is a Steam game, it works perfectly on PCLinuxOS, with Steam installed via Flatpak.

    The version analyzed here will be the Windows version, running via Flatpak and Proton.

    The game is based on the Unity engine, which ensures optimum compatibility with all operating systems supported by the engine (notably Android, Linux, Windows, iOS and MacOS).

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: Tunnelrat

    I started using Linux a few years ago. I have an aging PC (I'll get to that in a later question) that just isn't quite buff enough for Windows 10; knowing that 7 wouldn't be supported for eternity (and frustrated with M$ anyhow) I opted to give Linux a shot.

  • Mind Your Step: Vintage Computing on PCLinuxOS

    Alternatively, if that vintage printer connects to a network, it is possible to connect the printer to PCLinuxOS through a network connection at Port 9100 (the port used by HP's JetDirect print server).

    Even if you do get that vintage printer connected and working, the next thing you need to worry about is getting a source for ribbon, ink or toner. It makes no sense to purchase a vintage printer if you cannot purchase supplies for that printer.

    Then there is the issue of paper. Daisy wheel printers (remember those) were designed to take either fanfold paper or sheet paper. The issue here is that not all programs printing to these printers do not necessarily know whether you are using fanfold paper or sheet fed paper.

    Even if you configure one of these printers under CUPS, fanfold paper is generally assumed to be loaded into such printers. Also, the USB to Parallel and USB to Serial adapters do not inform CUPS that the printer is out of paper, because vintage printers in general do not have the capability to inform the host machine of that status.

    With many of today's low cost printers being able to work under PCLinuxOS, is there really any reason to use a vintage printer with PCLinuxOS?

The March 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the March 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS: Screenshot Showcase, PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotligh and Slipstream On PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: bliss

    Around 2011, I got serious and got a DSL line and started to download lots of distributions, but never found any I wanted to switch to until Mandriva went under and did not recover. I found PCLinuxOS around 2012.

    I also liked to read SF magazines, but they became too expensive after I had to retire from nursing. Now, I make extensive use of the San Francisco Public Library. I got interested in Japanese animation in the early 2000's then, due to that in Japanese comics called "Manga." I buy a few manga at low prices. To better understand the topics of the comics, I got interested in Japanese history and foods. I have read lots of books on Japanese history, ancient and modern.

    Why and when did you start using Linux?
    About 2006 when the Commodore Business Machines had gone under in 1994, I hoped forlornly that it would do the smart thing and start transitioning to the x86 processor architecture. One of my online friends suggested Mandriva, but could not get it together to send me copies. Another online friend took pity on me and sent me the Mandriva 2006 iso files on a DVD. I made the 6 CDs using Windows XP, created a partition on the Great Quality(not so great) laptop and installed Mandriva.

    I learned to use Knoppix as well from a book "Knoppix for Dummies". Shortly after starting with Mandriva, I joined SF-LUG to get help, principally with getting online with WiFi and repairing LiLo.

  • Slipstream On PCLinuxOS: Analysis

    If I were to define this game in one sentence, it would go something like this: A love letter to the arcade racers of the 80's (Outrun, Turbo Outrun, Outrunners, Top Gear and many others).

    Yes friends, the nostalgia is strong with this one, but it is not an empty nostalgia. Slipstream is inspired by the classics of the past, but it has enough personality to be original and fresh.

    The game was developed by Brazilian programmer Sandro Luiz de Paula, from Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, and the sound/music part by Stefan Moser, from Charleston, South Carolina.

    [...]

    Here we come to a very important point: There is no point in having great graphics and music, if the gameplay is lame. A pleasant surprise was the automatic detection of the joystick, without any additional configuration.

    The game is fast, exciting and leaves the player on the edge of his seat. So good is the animation in the game, that again, it is hard to believe that it was made in Java, due to the speed and quality of the game.

    Being able to play between four players on the same computer is a journey of nostalgia, to the time when children gathered in the homes of friends, to challenge them, whether it was at Super Mario Kart, or Top Gear (who doesn't remember?).

    Now, the controls are responsive, and the different tracks have their characteristics: rain, snow, desert, beach, which affects the control of the car, a very cool touch of realism.

    But, not everything is perfect: Special maneuvers, notably Drift and Slipstream are very difficult to do.

    The drift is done like this: Release the accelerator, touch the brake, and accelerator again. The problem is that this game mechanic is not intuitive: In all racing games, the drift is always done by pressing the hand brake, and, by slowing the acceleration a little, not with this confusing mechanic. It took me two days to do the drifts right.

    But worse is the slipstream, the maneuver that gives the game its name: This one, I never consciously managed, and it came out a few times, but alien to my will.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

The 10 Best KDE Plasma Widgets for KDE Desktop Environment

If you were looking for the best KDE Plasma widgets for your Linux desktop, then you are in the right place. There is much debate about the fact of who implemented the widget feature first on a computer GUI. But nobody can deny that the widgets have brought a new era in the modern user interface. Most of the people rely on beautiful widgets for performing different tasks without opening the main instance of the program. Although Windows ditched their native desktop widgets feature with their Windows 8 for the sake of the live tiles. Linux still has a great library of widgets that are being maintained by the developer community. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.7.13, 5.4.56, 4.19.137, and 4.14.192

  • Linux 5.7.13
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.7.13 kernel. All users of the 5.7 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.7.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.7.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.56
  • Linux 4.19.137
  • Linux 4.14.192

Games: Cursed Gem, Last Epoch, Jagged Alliance 2 and More

  • Cursed Gem is a pretty charming and amusing challenging platformer out now

    I have to admit, Cursed Gem is quite a nice surprise. Throwing in a little comedy into a challenging pixel-art platformer.

  • Action RPG 'Last Epoch' laughs at your free time with the biggest update ever

    Free time be damned, it's time to jump back into Last Epoch for another dozen hours or so because Eleventh Hour Games clearly don't want me to sleep tonight. On August 4 they released update 0.7.9, which they said was the "BIGGEST update in Last Epoch history". What's the big fuss about with this update? It splits off The Monolith of Fate end game into its own zone, with several islands each containing "a Timeline representing a reality that never was". Confused? Well, Last Epoch is an action RPG that involves a wee bit of time travel. As you progress and conquer timelines, you get all sorts of fancy rewards and you they're repeatable with different layouts. Sounds awesome.

  • Minesweeper but it's a rogue-lite with tons of features - DemonCrawl is out for Linux PC

    Oh no, I think DemonCrawl might just end up being my next 100 hour game and it's now available for Linux PC. Released originally in November 2019, the developer decided to support Linux to ensure people can get the best experience rather than relying on the Proton compatibility layer. Two weeks after announcing it and the Linux version has been released.

  • Jagged Alliance 2 game engine 'Stracciatella' has a big new release

    The community working to keep the classic Jagged Alliance 2 alive with the Stracciatella game engine have put out their first release in a few years. With the Stracciatella project their aim is to provide good cross-platform support, improve stability, fix bugs and provide a stable platform for mod development. It's a noble aim, especially when it's an old game long left behind by the original teams and in this case the original developer and publisher no longer even exist.

  • Master of Orion inspired open source 4x strategy FreeOrion has a new release

    Inspired originally by Master of Orion, the free and open source FreeOrion project has a brand new release. For the FreeOrion, this was a reasonably quick release considering they had another release back in February and they don't usually update too often. For a good reason this time though, as they've managed to do a major tech move from Python 2 to 3 to enable FreeOrion to stay up to date with modern code. That wasn't the only big change though.

  • Take an emotional trip through the mind in Into A Dream out now

    Into A Dream is a brand new release from indie developer Filipe F. Thomaz, telling a tale about diving into the mind of someone diagnosed with severe depression. You're quite literally exploring their mind too, using the power of medical science. You will be travelling through the mind of Luke Williams, as their last hope before "fading away". You need to find the events that led to their darkened mind, meeting family and friends (well, memories of them anyway) while finding a way to "trick him into letting you access his darker dreams and unveil the emotional, powerful and heartbreaking journey of his life".

  • Need another building and farming RPG? Verdant Village enters Steam Early Access

    Littlewood and Stardew Valley not enough for you? Need more farming, crafting and exploration? Verdant Village is now live in Early Access on Steam. "You've washed ashore in a foreign land. With nothing to your name other than a few tools you’ll have to learn how to live off the land. Explore, grow crops, and meet the locals. How you live is up to you. Can you create a new life for yourself in the small town of Amberglen?"—well, luckily for you the King seems nice and gave you an abandoned piece of land to call your own and it's up to you to bring it back to life.

LibreOffice 7.0 is Finally Available Now! Here are the Key Changes in this Major Release

The much awaited LibreOffice 7.0 is finally released. Check out the key changes in this new release and learn how to get the latest release on your Linux distribution. Read more