Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PCLOS

The October 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Those good surprises...

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS has always remained a reliable OS to work and, as the update included Lomanager, the distro's method to update LibreOffice, I couldn't delay.

Although the update was fast, LibreOffice was taking a considerable time to finish. Yes, I must thank my ISP for that: my connection has been unstable for over a week, with a speed sometimes down to a crawl.

Speed was abnormally slow. I became a bit restless.

That was when I saw the Steam icon on my desktop...the round icon that had not been clicked on since October 2015.

Read more

The September 2017 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the September 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The August 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the August 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The July 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The June 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the June 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS Roll-Up Release: Another Linux installed on my new notebook

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

I happened across a new ISO image for the PCLinuxOS KDE desktop distribution this week.

PCLOS is a classic rolling-release Linux distribution, so this is just a "roll-up" release, pulling all of the updates since the last release together to make new installations easier, faster and more reliable.

Every time a new rolling release update is made we talk about those first two points, how it makes installation faster and easier, but I think my recent experience with two ASUS laptops shows that the last point can be important as well.

Read more

The May 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
News
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the May 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLOS and blackPanther OS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews
  • Time for a change

    Three days ago, I decided to abandon my efforts to rescue my PCLOS KDE4 install, which was destroyed by a connection disruption while updating. I lost my connection for over a week and, when my ISP finally solved the problem, my desktop was so messed up that I gave up on it and decided to give PCLOS KDE5 a chance.

    I must confess that I am not a real fan of Plasma 5. However, as KDE4 is going the way of the dodo, I thought that it was better to take the leap and see how this beautiful Linux distro works with KDE's new desktop.

  • LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week blackPanther OS

    blackPanther OS is a Hungarian Linux distro. It takes out many features from other famous distros like GUI from fedora, drivers from Ubuntu and many others. The website of blackPanther OS states that:- “The blackPanther OS development started in 2002 by Charles K. Barcza. The First public version was 1.0 (Codename: Shadow) in 2003. Since then, the development is continuous, every year a new version is released. The last stable version, v16.1.2 has become available in Aug. of 2016. (The v16.2 is a special, non-free release, and v17.1 still under development) It was among the 5 top popular distributions January of 2010 on distrowatch.”

PCLinuxOS 2017.03

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

It has been about a year since I last explored the PCLinuxOS distribution. At that time I was experimenting with the project's MATE edition. Since I have not taken the chance to try PCLinuxOS since the distribution launched an edition with the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, I thought it would be fun to revisit this project. PCLinuxOS currently ships with version 5.8 of the Plasma desktop which is a long term support release of Plasma. The ISO file I downloaded for PCLinuxOS was 1.3GB in size.

Booting from the distribution's live media brings up a menu asking how we would like to launch the operating system. We can choose to launch PCLinuxOS with a graphical desktop with the default settings, load the desktop with safe mode graphics settings, boot to a text console or launch the project's system installer. Taking one of the live desktop options soon brings up a window asking us to select our keyboard's layout from a list. Then the Plasma desktop loads. PCLinuxOS has a varied and colourful wallpaper. There are icons on the desktop which open the Dolphin file manager and launch the system installer. At the bottom of the screen we find a panel which houses the application menu, a few quick-launch buttons, a task switcher and the system tray.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.