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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 2017.03

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PCLOS
Reviews

It has been about a year since I last explored the PCLinuxOS distribution. At that time I was experimenting with the project's MATE edition. Since I have not taken the chance to try PCLinuxOS since the distribution launched an edition with the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, I thought it would be fun to revisit this project. PCLinuxOS currently ships with version 5.8 of the Plasma desktop which is a long term support release of Plasma. The ISO file I downloaded for PCLinuxOS was 1.3GB in size.

Booting from the distribution's live media brings up a menu asking how we would like to launch the operating system. We can choose to launch PCLinuxOS with a graphical desktop with the default settings, load the desktop with safe mode graphics settings, boot to a text console or launch the project's system installer. Taking one of the live desktop options soon brings up a window asking us to select our keyboard's layout from a list. Then the Plasma desktop loads. PCLinuxOS has a varied and colourful wallpaper. There are icons on the desktop which open the Dolphin file manager and launch the system installer. At the bottom of the screen we find a panel which houses the application menu, a few quick-launch buttons, a task switcher and the system tray.

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The April 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the April 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The March 2017 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the March 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS 2017.03 KDE Edition Lands with KDE Plasma 5.8.6 LTS, Linux Kernel 4.9

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PCLOS
MDV

The developers of the PCLinuxOS distribution announced the release of PCLinuxOS 2017.03 KDE Edition, an updated install medium that ships with all the latest KDE technologies and applications.

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.9.13 kernel, PCLinuxOS 2017.03 KDE Edition includes the KDE Plasma 5.8.6 LTS (Long Term Support) desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.31.0.

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Recreating the PCLinuxOS Full Monty with KDE Plasma Activities

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KDE
PCLOS

When I recently wrote about the new PCLinuxOS release, I was a bit disappointed to find that the Full Monty version had been laid to rest. I'm sure there were a lot of good reasons for this decision, and I have no quarrel with it. But it still made me a bit sad, because I have always kept the Full Monty on at least one of my systems (it is currently on my Acer All-In-One desktop), and I often showed it to people who were curious about Linux, as an example of its breadth, depth and flexibility.

So I decided that it might be a useful exercise for me to try to create the equivalent of the Full Monty desktop starting from the latest PCLinuxOS KDE5 distribution. There are two major features which distinguish the Full Monty desktop - it had six virtual desktops, each of which was dedicated to a specific use, and it had lots and lots and lots of packages installed. The desktops looked like this:

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Hands-on: New PCLinuxOS installation images

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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS is an independent distribution, it is not derived from or dependent upon any other current distribution. It is a rolling-release distribution, so it gets a steady flow of updates rather than having periodic point-releases. There was a time when the intention was to update the PCLinuxOS distribution images quarterly, but it seems that turned out to be too much work for too little return.

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The February 2017 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the February 2017 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The December 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The November 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The October 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

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