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PCLOS

Look at PCLinuxOS 2008 ‘MiniMe’ Edition

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PCLOS

linuxlove.org: The 2008 MiniMe edition it’s just a little preview of what will be available in the final release. It’s name suits this release very well as it’s indeed small. The ISO is about 200MB in size, it provides a very basic KDE 3.5.8 desktop and ALSA 1.0.15 running under a 2.6.22.15 kernel.

PCLinuxOS

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garbledzombie.wordpress: PCLinuxOS is a Mandriva fork that seemingly shot up in distrowatch’s top distros list. I was more than a tad surprised at this, seeing a world where nobody ever mentioned PCLinuxOS as much as say, Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora or OpenSUSE. Intrigued, I read more about this distro and decided to give it a shot.

PCLinuxOS Day 4 - Extending the System

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ruminations: PCLinuxOS comes with a decent set of basic applications. OpenOffice.org, Thunderbird and Firefox are all there, GIMP for graphics, K3b for burning your cd/dvd’s, Amarok and MPlayer in the multimedia department. Synaptic is the tool to extend the range of applications and graphical environments.

Ubuntu vs. PCLinuxOS: a new winner?

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Ubuntu

koplowicz.com: I’ve been using Ubuntu (or a derivative) for two years now. I was amazed at how polished and user-friendly it is. It doesn’t come out of the box with a lot of the software I want, but it’s super easy to install whatever I want. But then I noticed the new cool kid: PCLinuxOS.

PCLinuxOS Magazine January 2008 Released

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PCLinuxOS Magazine, January 2008 (Issue 17) is available to download. Some highlights include Common Information Commands, How to repair kdeinit problems, and It's Magic!

PCLinuxOS Day 3 - Exploring the Desktop

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PCLOS

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm: I have used the GNOME desktop for most of the time in the last year and a half, but the series about PC-BSD and DesktopBSD did a lot to build up appreciation for the KDE desktop. PCLinuxOS is running the KDE 3.5.8 desktop (after updates) and let’s see how it is organized and what applications are delivered by default.

PCLinuxOS Day 2 - Bringing the System Up-to-Date

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opensourcelearning.info: Any linux distribution is part of a continuous proces of development, updates and upgrades. When you install a freshly downloaded distribution you can expect at least a few updates waiting for you. For that reason I decided to run a full update before taking a closer look at the system as a whole.

PCLinuxOS Day 1 - Installation

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opensourcelearning.info: In the first stage of writing this series I will install PCLinuxOS (and some remasters) in virtual machines. This is just to make it easier for me to carry PCLinuxOS around and use the tools and software that it provides.

PCLinuxOS Rediscovered

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rutsum.blogspot: Now that I'm back on PCLinuxOS, I feel a lot more comfortable with my PC, and my productivity (if I do something productive, that is) has increased 10 folds, as compared to Windows XP, and just about a billion times if compared to Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon.

The Case of Ultumix or How NOT to Remaster PCLinuxOS

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opensourcelearning.info: One of the core principles of open source development is “freedom”. As such, there are few limitations for developers and end users to take the work of others and move it into a direction they deem better. This has led to a proliferation of Linux distributions, remasters and scores of applications that sometimes are hard to distinguish from other distributions, remasters or applications.

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More in Tux Machines

Code for Germany project launches

Each OK Lab is a source of a great variety of projects, tackling different social issues and topics. For example, the OK Lab in Hamburg has a strong focus on urban development, and has created a map which shows the distribution of playgrounds in the city. An app from the OK Lab Heilbronn depicts the quality of tap water by region, and another from the OK Lab Cologne helps users find the closest defibrillator in their area. One more of our favorite developments is called “Kleiner Spatz”, which translates to “Little Sparrow,” and helps parents to find free child care in their city. Read more

Today in Techrights

Android Build Support Improved For Libdrm

Emil Velikov, the new Mesa release manager, just landed a large set of libdrm patches for improving the open-source graphics drivers for Android. Emil enabled Android build support within Mesa's DRM library (libdrm) for the Intel driver along with the Freedreno (reverse-engineered Qualcomm Adreno), Nouveau, and Radeon drivers. Up to now any Android support wasn't part of mainline libdrm and landed today in time for the next update, libdrm v2.4.57. At this time there's no Android updates to talk about for the Mesa/Gallium3D drivers themselves. The new Mesa release manager has also been working on some other Mesa build improvements recently like working on make dist support. Read more

THE AWESOMELY EPIC GUIDE TO KDE

Desktops on Linux. They’re a concept completely alien to users of other operating systems because they never having to think about them. Desktops must feel like the abstract idea of time to the Amondawa tribe, a thought that doesn’t have any use until you’re in a different environment. But here it is – on Linux you don’t have to use the graphical environment lurking beneath your mouse cursor. You can change it for something completely different. If you don’t like windows, switch to xmonad. If you like full-screen apps, try Gnome. And if you’re after the most powerful and configurable point-and-click desktop, there’s KDE. KDE is wonderful, as they all are in their own way. But in our opinion, KDE in particular suffers from poor default configuration and a rather allusive learning curve. This is doubly frustrating, firstly because it has been quietly growing more brilliant over the last couple of years, and secondly, because KDE should be the first choice for users unhappy with their old desktop – in particular, Windows 8 users pining for an interface that makes sense. But fear not. We’re going to use a decade’s worth of KDE firefighting to bring you the definitive guide to making KDE look good and function slightly more like how you might expect it to. We’re not going to look at KDE’s applications, other than perhaps Dolphin; we’re instead going to look at the functionality in the desktop environment itself. And while our guinea pig distribution is going to be Mageia, this guide will be equally applicable to any recent KDE desktop running from almost any distribution, so don’t let the default Mageia background put you off. Read more