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PCLOS

Hands-on with PCLinuxOS: A terrific release

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PCLOS
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I had been thinking that a new PCLinuxOS release was due any time now, based on their quarterly release schedule. Sure enough, it has now arrived, just in time for Christmas - PCLinuxOS 2014.12.

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Also: Santa Claus has Linux in his sack -- PCLinuxOS 2014.12 is here

PCLinuxOS 2014.12 released

Happy Holidays from PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 2014.12 isos have been released for Full Monty, KDE, MATE and LXDE. Highlights include kernel 3.18.1, ffmpeg 2.5.1, mesa 10.4.0, SysVinit (no systemd) and all popular applications such as Firefox, Thunderbird, LibreOffice and VLC have been updated to their latest versions. Please note if you have been keeping up with your PCLinuxOS software updates then there is NO NEED to install fresh from a 2014.12 iso. These ISOS are final releases based on legacy technology. Future releases will default to grub2 and support uefi and gpt partition formats.

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Initial impressions of PCLinuxOS 2014.08

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Reviews

I spend more time looking at the family trees of Linux distributions than I do looking at my own family tree. I find it interesting to see how distributions grow from their parent distribution, either acting as an extra layer of features which regularly re-bases itself or as a separate fork. New distributions usually tend to remain similar in most ways to their parent distro, using the same package manager and maintaining similar philosophies. When I look at the family trees of Linux distributions one project stands out more than others: PCLinuxOS.

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[PCLinuxOS] New ISO images released, 08/12/2014

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All official ISO images were updated on 08/12/2014 and are available for direct download or via torrent.

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PCLinuxOS 2014.07 Arrives with Linux Kernel 3.15.4 and KDE 4.12.3 – Gallery

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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS comes with many flavors, but the default is actually KDE. The developers also make a few other versions, like KDE MiniMe, LXDE, or FullMonty, but this is the main one downloaded by most users.

The distribution actually follows a rolling release model, which means that new major features and other changes are introduced regularly through the update channel. Every month, the download ISOs are regenerated with the new update, but if you already have the operating system installed you only have to update it regularly.

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PCLinuxOS Magazine August 2014

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PCLOS

Welcome From The Chief Editor

Templates: Google Docs Best "Hidden" Feature
Inkscape Tutorial: Holiday Wallpaper
PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner
ms_meme's Nook: Oh, Look At Me Now
Extend LibreOffice Capabilities With Extensions
Cool Add-ins For LibreOffice & OpenOffice
Programming With Gtkdialog, Part Five
More Templates: LibreOffice Plus!
LibreOffice Macros
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
Game Zone: Tank Riders
PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: Ramchu
Inkscape Tutorial: Tracing A Logo
Screenshot Showcase

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June 2014 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the June 2014 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved.

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Hands-on with PCLinuxOS 2014.05 KDE and LXDE: The Linux with something for everyone

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Reviews

The last time I wrote about PCLinuxOS I was a bit critical about its Linux kernel version being quite a bit behind most of the other mainstream Linux distributions, so I was pleased to see that they have really caught up with this release. It has kernel 3.12.18, KDE 4.12.3, X.org X server 1.12.4, LibreOffice 4.2.4.2 and Firefox 29.0.1. Those are all quite good, and that Firefox release is really "hot off the press".

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openSUSE Says Goodbye to AMD/ATI Catalyst (fglrx) Proprietary Graphics Drivers

openSUSE developer Bruno Friedmann, informed the community of the openSUSE Linux operating system about the fact that he's planning to remove the old ATI/AMD Catalyst (also known as fglrx) proprietary graphics drivers. Read more

Maximizing the benefits of open source in IoT

With the dawn of the Internet of Things, software is making its way into every product, into every industry. And along with software come developers, who bring their beliefs, attitudes, expertise, and habits along with them. One of those is open source technology — a staple in the software industry since the 1980s, but a new and often scary concept for many traditional industries, whose businesses are built on protecting their assets and intellectual property. In this article, we will illustrate how open source technologies permeate every part of the IoT development stack, and outline how open source can be used as a means of market control as well as a booster of innovation and a way to tap into the IoT developer talent pool. The data have been collected from 3,700 IoT developers in 150 countries across the globe, surveyed in Q4 2015 and shines a light on how big a deal open source really is in IoT, why developers love it, and how companies can create a successful commercial strategy around the use of open source by aligning themselves with the values of that core stakeholder group that are developers. Read more