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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS: the walking dead

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PCLOS
Reviews

If you thought that this review would continue with the usual sections like keyboard setup, list of applications, network drive connectivity and so on, I must disappoint you.

My time with PCLinuxOS KDE 2014.12 finished at that point. I see no reason to test a distribution that is so narrow-minded that it cannot allow users outside of the US to use it out of the box, and that does not bother with updating their core ISO image. There are plenty of distributions that work much better than PCLinuxOS.

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Is PCLinuxOS Is the Best Rolling Release Distro?

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PCLOS

I realize the title of this article has already set some of you into a state of confusion. How dare I suggest that anything besides Arch could be the "best" rolling release distro, right?

Well I'd counter with this: Arch is indeed awesome, it has dizzying fast performance and documentation that is second to none...however it's modeled around the "Arch Way." Meaning, if you want to learn more about Linux and its underpinnings, Arch is for you.

On the other hand if you simply want an operating system that you install once and it's ready for you right out of the box, then perhaps Arch isn't for you. This is where I believe PCLinuxOS comes in.

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The February 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the February 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Introducing The Chimpbox Quad Core

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PCLOS

Fully assembled, Fan-less, Silent Mini PC kit featuring the A68N-5000 Mini-ITX motherboard with AMD Fusion APU A4-5000 Quad-Core Processor. With an Integrated Graphics Processor AMD Radeon™ HD8330 This PC is able to provide plenty of processing power for all of your everyday computing needs in a very convenient, compact and energy-efficient package. Unit comes with PCLinuxOS installed.

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The December 2015 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2015 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

All of Your Favorite PCLinuxOS Editions Are Now Available into a Single ISO Image

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GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The Linux AIO project has spent all summer creating new ISOs for various popular GNU/Linux distributions that have multiple editions, so they have had the great pleasure, as always, of informing us about some of them.

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The July 2015 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved.

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PCLinuxOS, A User Friendly Linux Distribution

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Linux
PCLOS
Reviews


PCLinuxOS Linux distribution

PCLinuxOS is one of the many distributions that exist in the world of Linux, but this caught my attention when I installed it on my computer. Let's take a look at PCLinuxOS, a distro that is user friendly.
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

PCLinuxOS 2014.12 MATE screenshot tour

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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 2014.12 has been released, so it’s time for another screenshot tour. I toyed with the idea of doing a full review on Desktop Linux Reviews, but the next release of PCLinuxOS should have some major changes so I’m holding off until that is available to review. In the meantime, you can get a good look at PCLinuxOS 2014.12 MATE in the screenshots below.

PCLinuxOS 2014.12 includes the following changes as noted on the official PCLinuxOS site:

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Hands-on with PCLinuxOS: A terrific release

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PCLOS
Reviews

I had been thinking that a new PCLinuxOS release was due any time now, based on their quarterly release schedule. Sure enough, it has now arrived, just in time for Christmas - PCLinuxOS 2014.12.

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Also: Santa Claus has Linux in his sack -- PCLinuxOS 2014.12 is here

PCLinuxOS 2014.12 released

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

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More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

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    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
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OSS Leftovers

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  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
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  • Thank you CUSEC!
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  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
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Ubuntu: Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04, Lubuntu 17.04 EoL

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    Canonical's Ubuntu Core, a tiny, transactional version of the Ubuntu Linux OS for IoT devices, runs highly secure Linux application packages, known as "snaps," that can be upgraded remotely.
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    Ubuntu’s changed a lot in the last year, and everything is leading up to a really exciting event: the release of 18.04 LTS! This next version of Ubuntu will once again offer a stable foundation for countless humans who use computers for work, play, art, relaxation, and creation. Among the various visual refreshes of Ubuntu, it’s also time to go to the community and ask for the best wallpapers. And it’s also time to look for a new video and music file that will be waiting for Ubuntu users on the install media’s Examples folder, to reassure them that their video and sound drivers are quite operational. Long-term support releases like Ubuntu 18.04 LTS are very important, because they are downloaded and installed ten times more often than every single interim release combined. That means that the wallpapers, video, and music that are shipped will be seen ten times more than in other releases. So artists, select your best works. Ubuntu enthusiasts, spread the word about the contest as far and wide as you can. Everyone can help make this next LTS version of Ubuntu an amazing success.
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