Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE: Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia and GSoC Work

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia

    In June month we gathered in Slimbook’s offices to work on Plasma. Along with Plasma developers, we were also joined by KDE Usability and Productivity team.

    During the sprint I mostly worked to create up-to-date image for Plasma Mobile, as from last few weeks Plasma Mobile image was quite out-of-date and needed update.

  • Somewhat Usable

    Adding a feature by yourself is a lot satisfying than requesting someone to add that for you, cause now you are both the producer and the consumer. But to be honest, I never thought I would be the one implementing the Magnetic Lasso for Krita when I requested it 4 years back, leave the fact that I even getting paid for doing so. So here are the first tests being done on it.

  • View and Examples

    This week I began learning about QML to try to fix the View that show the graphs and tools for manipulating graphs.

  • Month 2 in making the Titler – GSoC ’19

    From my understanding so far (forgive me for any mistakes that I might make – it’s a different codebase and different concepts – I wholeheartedly welcome corrections and suggestions) the whole producer boils down to two parts – the actual producer code (which is in C and which is the thing which does the ‘producer stuff’) and the wrapper code (which ‘wraps’, supplements and does the actual rendering part of the QML frames). The wrapper files are responsible for mainly rendering the QML templates that are passed to it and make it available for the actual producer to use. And consequently, most of the work is to be done in the wrapper files, as the producer in itself doesn’t change much as it will still do the same things like the existing XML producer (producer_kdenlivetitle.c) – such as loading a file, generating a frame, calling rendering methods from the wrapper files.

KDE: SDDM, Kate and More

Filed under
KDE
  • [GSoC – 4] Achieving consistency between SDDM and Plasma

    This blog post marks the landing of the initial implementation of theme syncing between SDDM and Plasma, which you may already have read about in Nate’s post.

    Those of you running master can test the feature out by going to the Advanced tab in the Login Screen (SDDM) config module.

  • Kate LSP Status – July 21

    The new LSP client by Mark Nauwelaerts keeps making nice progress.

    It will not be shipped with the KDE Applications 19.08 release, but in master it is now compiled & installed per default. You only need to activate it on the plugin configuration page in Kate’s settings dialog to be able to use it.

    For details how to build Kate master with it’s plugins, please take a look at this guide.

    If you want to start to hack on the plugin, you find it in the kate.git, addons/lspclient.

    Feel welcome to show up on kwrite-devel@kde.org and help out! All development discussions regarding this plugin happen there.

    If you are already familiar with Phabricator, post some patch directly at KDE’s Phabricator instance.

  • Second month progress

    So yes, we are gradually moving our way forward towards completely removing our dependence over KAuth. But there are some things which are yet to complete. To name one, I need to finish up QDbus communication from helper to application which sends dbus (Inter Process Communication) messages. Currently I had tried this in QDbus patch, but it is not yet fully complete. All this stuff is done by KAuth currently in master.

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 80

Filed under
KDE

Somehow we’ve gone through 80 weeks of progress reports for KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative! Does that seem like a lot to you? Because it seems like a lot to me. Speaking of a lot, features are now pouring in for KDE’s Plasma 5.17 release, as well as Applications 19.08. Even more is lined up for Applications 19.12 too, which promises to be quite a release.

Read more

LabPlot has got some beautifying and lots of datasets

Filed under
KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

Hello everyone! The second part of this year's GSoC is almost over, so I was due to let you know the progress made in the last 3 weeks. I can assure you we haven't lazed since then. I think I managed to make quite good progress, so everything is going as planned, or I could say that even better. If you haven't read about this year's project or you just want to go through what has already been accomplished you can check out my previous post.

So let's just go through the new things step by step. I'll try to explain the respective feature, and also give examples using videos or screenshots.

The first step was to improve the welcome screen and make it easily usable, dynamic, clean and intuitive for users. This step was very important since the welcome screen is what the users will first get in contact with when they start using LabPlot.

Read more

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things.

Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of.

That can make deciding to use it a little confusing. Neon appears to be a Linux operating system. It boots your computer. It displays a full desktop environment. It runs *some* applications so you can go about your computing tasks much like using any other -- ahh -- real Linux distribution.

That last part is a clue to what makes KDE Neon different.

Getting somewhat technical for a minute, KDE Neon is more of a specialty offering than a fully endowed operating system. Other distros support a wide range of applications from the same software format type.

For example, Ubuntu runs .Deb formatted packages from the Debian Linux family. All .Deb packages will run on Ubuntu- and other Debian-based distros. Which desktop environment is used does not matter, be it KDE, Xfce, GNOME or whatever.

Ditto for RPM-based Linux distributions, like Fedora and Red Hat. All you need is a package management tool or knowledge of the commands for apt, yum or pacman, depending on the distribution's Linux family. However, that is a skill set that lots of Linux users never had to learn.

Not so with KDE Neon. Neon runs only a specific category of KDE applications: the latest. Neon's developers assert that their "pseudo" distro does not support most other software. In fact, non-KDE packages most likely will not even install on Neon.

Read more

Powered by Plasma: ALBA Synchrotron in Barcelona, Spain

Filed under
KDE

As you go about your daily tasks, you’re probably unaware that Plasma runs on the computers in one of Europe’s largest research facilities. We were also oblivious – until we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at FOSDEM 2019.

We’re always looking for interesting stories from people who use KDE software at their workplace, in school, or in government institutions. You can imagine our delight, then, when we met Sergi Blanch-Torné at this year’s FOSDEM.

Sergi is a Controls Software Engineer at ALBA, a KDE user, and a Free software advocate and contributor. Not only was he willing to tell us about his favorite KDE apps, but he also works at one of the most amazing places on Earth! In this interview, he tells us what it’s like to work at ALBA, and answers the burning question: “what even is a synchrotron?”.

ALBA is a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility in the Barcelona Synchrotron Park, in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain. Managed by the Consortium for the Construction, Equipping and Exploitation of the Synchrotron Light Source (CELLS), it is jointly funded by the Spanish and the Catalonian Administration.

Read more

Latte Dock, first beta for v0.9 (v0.8.97)

Filed under
KDE

I know you waited for this so long but believe me there were really good reasons. Check out the past articles concerning Latte git version and you can get a picture what major new features are introduced for v0.9. Of course this is an article for a beta release and as such I will not provide any fancy videos or screenshots; this is a goal for official stable release article.

Read more

Also: Latte Dock 0.9 Beta Brings Wayland Improvements, Smoother Experience

KDE: KDevelop 5.3.3 Released, Latte Dock Update and Release of Kaidan 0.4.1

Filed under
KDE

  • KDevelop 5.3.3 released

    We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.3.3. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using a previous version of KDevelop 5.3.

    You can find a Linux AppImage as well as the source code archives on our download page. Windows installers are no longer offered, we are looking for someone interested to take care of that.

  • Latte, Documentation and Reports...

    First Latte beta release for v0.9.0 is getting ready and I am really happy about it Smile . But today instead of talking for the beta release I am going to focus at two last minute "arrivals" for v0.9; that is Layouts Reports and Documentation. If you want to read first the previous article you can do so at Latte and "Flexible" settings...

  • Kaidan 0.4.1 released!

    After some problems were encountered in Kaidan 0.4.1, we tried to fix the most urgent bugs.

Krita 4.2.3 Released

Filed under
KDE

Today we’re releasing Krita 4.2.3. This is mostly a bug fix release, but has one new feature: it is now possible to rotate the canvas with a two-finger touch gesture. This feature was implemented by Sharaf Zaman for his 2019 Google Summer of Code work of porting Krita to Android. The feature also works on other platforms, of course.

The most important bug fix is a workaround for Windows installations with broken, outdated or insufficient graphics drivers. The core of the issue is that our development platform, Qt, in its current version needs a working OpenGL or Direct3D installation as soon as there is a single component in the application that uses QML, a technology for creating user interfaces. We have managed to work around this issue and especially users of Windows 7 systems that have become a bit messy should be able to run Krita again.

Read more

Q4OS 3.8 Centaurus, stable

Filed under
OS
KDE

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of the brand new stable Q4OS 3.8 version, codenamed 'Centaurus'. This is a long-term support LTS release, to be supported for at least five years with security patches and software updates.

The primary Q4OS aim is stability. As we want to provide as stable as possible operating system for companies as well as for individuals, once installed and configured, Q4OS will work reliably in a long standing way, getting security fixes and updates. Adopting a new feature into the core system could be committed in a highly exceptional cases only. We treat such possible cases as best as possible, doing testing and investigating consequences carefully before such a change.

Q4OS Centaurus is based on Debian Buster 10 and Plasma 5.14, optionally Trinity 14.0.6, desktop environment, and it's available for 64bit and 32bit/i686pae computers, as well as for older i386 systems without PAE extension. We are working hard to bring it for ARM devices too.

Read more

Also: Q4OS 3.8 Released As A Traditional Desktop Linux Distribution Built Atop Debian 10.0

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Excellent Utilities: Ulauncher – Sublime application launcher for Linux

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We are covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. Ulauncher is a fast application launcher for Linux. It has a minimal design, dependent on only a few resources, very fast, and works on virtually all Linux desktops. The software is written in Python, using GTK+. This review is carried out with the latest beta release of the software. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Problematic Privileges, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order

  • Linux Action News 115

    We're pleasantly surprised by a new Linux distro, EvilGnome malware spies on Gnome Shell users, and more good news for MacBook Linux users. Plus why RetroArch coming to Steam is a bit controversial, ubuntu-wsl is a cold drink for Windows users, and gpodder needs a new maintainer.

  • Problematic Privileges | TechSNAP 407b

    Wes takes a quick look at a container escape proof-of-concept and reviews Docker security best practices.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 155 - Stealing cars and ransomware

    Josh and Kurt talk about a new way to steal cars because a service didn't do proper background checks. We also discuss how this relates to working with criminals, such as ransomware, and what it means for the future of the ransomware industry.

  • gnu World Order 13x30

KDE: Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia and GSoC Work

  • Plasma Mobile at Plasma Sprint Valencia

    In June month we gathered in Slimbook’s offices to work on Plasma. Along with Plasma developers, we were also joined by KDE Usability and Productivity team. During the sprint I mostly worked to create up-to-date image for Plasma Mobile, as from last few weeks Plasma Mobile image was quite out-of-date and needed update.

  • Somewhat Usable

    Adding a feature by yourself is a lot satisfying than requesting someone to add that for you, cause now you are both the producer and the consumer. But to be honest, I never thought I would be the one implementing the Magnetic Lasso for Krita when I requested it 4 years back, leave the fact that I even getting paid for doing so. So here are the first tests being done on it.

  • View and Examples

    This week I began learning about QML to try to fix the View that show the graphs and tools for manipulating graphs.

  • Month 2 in making the Titler – GSoC ’19

    From my understanding so far (forgive me for any mistakes that I might make – it’s a different codebase and different concepts – I wholeheartedly welcome corrections and suggestions) the whole producer boils down to two parts – the actual producer code (which is in C and which is the thing which does the ‘producer stuff’) and the wrapper code (which ‘wraps’, supplements and does the actual rendering part of the QML frames). The wrapper files are responsible for mainly rendering the QML templates that are passed to it and make it available for the actual producer to use. And consequently, most of the work is to be done in the wrapper files, as the producer in itself doesn’t change much as it will still do the same things like the existing XML producer (producer_kdenlivetitle.c) – such as loading a file, generating a frame, calling rendering methods from the wrapper files.

System administrator responsibilities: 9 critical tasks

System administrators are critical to the reliable and successful operation of an organization and its network operations center and data center. A sysadmin must have expertise with the system's underlying platform (i.e., Windows, Linux) as well as be familiar with multiple areas including networking, backup, data restoration, IT security, database operations, middleware basics, load balancing, and more. Sysadmin tasks are not limited to server management, maintenance, and repair, but also any functions that support a smoothly running production environment with minimal (or no) complaints from customers and end users. Although sysadmins have a seemingly endless list of responsibilities, some are more critical than others. If you work in a sysadmin role (or hope to one day), make sure you are ready to follow these best practices. Read more