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KDE

KDE vs. GNOME – everything you need to know

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KDE
GNOME

The fight for dominance in the Linux desktop environments has mostly been a tug of war between GNOME and KDE. It is difficult to portray a winner in this tug of war. The user community influence and its user preference determine which Linux desktop environment to choose as an adaptive platform. This presumed stalemate in the Linux desktop arena portrays KDE and GNOME as the main major players.

It is common for a Linux user to side with either GNOME or KDE desktop environment based on the Linux community influence, other users’ influence, or usage popularity. This article is here to make an analytical comparison between these two Linux desktop environments. We will explore both the strengths and weaknesses of these two Linux desktop environments. At the end of the article, your decision to go with or remain with either of these two Linux desktop environments will be based on their marketable feature strengths and their evident weaknesses that your Linux lifestyle can accommodate.

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Hands-on with KaOS Linux - An Independent KDE Plasma Desktop Distribution

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OS
KDE
Linux

I have spent some time looking at independent Linux distributions – that means those that are built from scratch and not derived from one of the larger, generally better-known distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Arch, etc.), such as Solus, which I wrote about earlier. This time I am going to look at KaOS Linux.

The screen shot above shows the initial display of a freshly installed KaOS system. If you are not familiar with the side-panel orientation used here, it is basically the same as the traditional bottom or top panel desktop, but with everything "standing on end". The complete desktop menu is at the top of the panel, just click on the "K" symbol (the desktop menu is open in this screen shot); the common application launchers are just below that, and the controls for things like the network, volume, bluetooth, network and such are at the bottom.

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KDE’s NeoChat Matrix Client Gets New Login Page, Multimodal Mode, and Message Editing

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KDE

Introduced two months ago as part of KDE’s first Apps update in 2021, NeoChat is a Matrix chat client supported on both desktop and mobile and that comes with a neat set of features, including a built-in image editor, support for sending and accepting invitations, the ability to remember the last room you’ve joined, support for showing the last read message, as well as read markers.

The first major update is out now, as developer Carl Schwan reports on his blog, enhancing NeoChat with more super powers, including a new multimodal mode that lets you view and interact with multiple chat rooms simultaneously by opening them in new windows, and the ability to edit messages and also display in the chat if a message has been edited.

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openSUSE Breeze Dark Plasma Style

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KDE
SUSE

I am happy to say that I now have published my openSUSE Breeze Dark Plasma Style for the world to use. If the color scheme I have previously release is any indicator of interest, there will be a few dozen that download it and that is good enough for me. I will be quite content if at least two others check this out. I am just happy I have finally navigated my way through using the Plasma-SDK, Git and the Plink.com site to make this happen.

If you are interested in making your own Plasma Style, the easiest way to get started with it is going to be using the SDK. It essentially restores some of that Plasma4 functionality to Plasma5 in customizing your desktop. I do wish this little thing would have been better publicized but at least it has been made and I did happen to find it.

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Also: Okular: Should continuous view be an okular setting or a document setting?

First Beta Release for Krita 4.4.3

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KDE

The Krita team is releasing the first beta of Krita 4.4.3. This is purely a bugfix release.

The Linux appimage and the source .tar.gz and .tar.xz tarballs are signed. You can retrieve the public key with gpg: “gpg –recv-key 7468332F”. The signatures are here (filenames ending in .sig).

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KDE Plasma 5.21’s First Point Release Improves Support for Nvidia Optimus Laptops

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.21.1 is here just a week after the launch of KDE Plasma 5.21, which introduced a brand-new Kickoff application launchers, a new System Monitor app, a new dark theme, better Wayland support, and numerous other improvements.

This first point release is a maintenance update that fixes bugs to improve the Plasma Wayland session on Nvidia Optimus laptops so it will no longer crash on login, improve the new System Monitor app to no longer crash on launch when not using the optional systemd startup feature, and make the Task Manager let you run third-party executable programs pinned to it.

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NeoChat 1.1

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KDE

Exactly 2 months after NeoChat 1.0, the NeoChat team is happy to announce a new release of NeoChat. NeoChat is a native client for the decentralized communication network Matrix.

Aside from the many bug fixes, performance improvements, and subtle appearance improvements, NeoChat 1.1 brings many new features that will make your experience with it more convenient.

Thanks to the work of Hannah, Nicolas, and Tobias, this release also brings NeoChat to many more platforms. Nightly builds of NeoChat are now available on Android, Flatpak, AppImage, macOS and Windows. Not all of them are considered production ready, but we hope to improve the support for them in future release.

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What is the KDE Editor in Linux?

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KDE
Linux

Using a Linux distribution that uses a KDE desktop, you will see a couple of options concerning text editors. The KDE project will officially support a couple of editors, such as Kate and KWrite. Both are graphical text editors containing several advanced features and some extra niceties found in some common standard editors. This section will describe each editor and also the features that you may use in shell scripting.

This is the basic editor for the KDE environment. It offers word-style text editing with support for code syntax editing and highlighting and is used for different programming languages. It uses color-coding to distinguish comments, constants, and functions. You should notice that the for loop carries an icon that connects the opening and closing braces. The editing window provides cut-and-paste capabilities.

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Sok 2021 Update 2

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KDE

I have completed a lot of the server side work now . I have figured out the endpoints on which the API will work . I have decided that /post/{platform} is going to be the endpoint where platforms are hard-coded as Twitter , Mastodon and Reddit.
To complete the post you will have to call the API like this
/post/{platform}?image=
&text=
One big advantage with FastAPI is that you can just do localhost:8000/redoc to get the redocs api documentaion fo the same and no additional work needs to be on the server side.

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The Application Of New Things

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KDE

KDE has, for a very long time, had this thing called Get Hot New Stuff, which is the name for a whole pile of tech which all exists just so you can just click a button in your wallpapers dialog that will pop up a dialog where you can, well, get hot new wallpapers for your system. Or mouse cursors. Or Plasma themes. Or books in Peruse. Or templates in a bunch of apps, or any variety of other things.

For a while now, it's been possible to add something called an adoption command, which is what will make a button show up in that dialog, and in Discover, labelled "Use". It's been used in a few places, but i recently sat down and got a bunch of little tools done that lets you set various things from the command line, and that in turn allowed me to also add those tools as adoption commands for the Get Hot New Stuff dialogues which download the stuff that those tools can apply.

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Also: Season Of KDE – Project Update 1

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More in Tux Machines

Free Software Leftovers

  • From Clean & Green Mockup to OpenBSD cwm(1) desktop

    If the words CGA or Hercules raise sweet memories from your far away youth, the Mockup Clean & Green from u/awareofdistractions may hit you right in the heart. And if you like it so much, it may be used for real-life desktop environment using OpenBSD stock and ports material.

  • Learning more about our users

    At the Tor Project we practice user-centered design. This means we put our users at the heart of our development process, making a conscious effort to understand the contexts in which people use our tools and paying particular attention to the bumps they encounter along the way.

    Many digital product companies rely heavily on data gathered from invasive tracking scripts to better understand their users’ behavior, further fueling the surveillance economy. However that’s not how we do things at Tor – instead, we aim to conduct research that respects the basic principles of privacy and consent.

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a11

    Tor Browser 10.5a11 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • FSFE20 +++ IloveFS +++ Job vacancy

    In our February Newsletter, we interview our founding president Georg Greve as part of our publication series to celebrate 20 Years FSFE, we reflect on I love Free Software Day and our FOSDEM participation, we advertise our new job vacancy and as usual we report on our diverse community activities.

  • Keeping platforms open

    My previous article, Whatsapp and the domestication of users, got more attention than I was expecting. Some responses gave me a lot to think about,1 especially regarding actions we can take. I suggest reading that article first; it explained what “user domestication” is and why it’s a problem. It enumerated three countermeasures: FOSS, simplicity, and open platforms.

    Hard problems, by definition, lack easy solutions. Simply choosing (or creating) a platform that avoids user domestication isn’t enough if that platform can change. The price of freedom is eternal vigilance; in addition to settling on the right platform, we must ensure that it honors its users in both the present and the future. Keeping a platform FOSS and simple is more straightforward2 than keeping a platform “open”.

    How do we keep an open platform from becoming a closed platform in the future?

Programming Leftovers

  • 6 Top Data Analysis Tools for Big Data

    Big Data is an all-inclusive term that refers to data sets so large and complex that they need to be processed by specially designed hardware and software tools. The data sets are typically of the order of tera or exabytes in size. These data sets are created from a diverse range of sources: sensors that gather climate information, publicly available information such as magazines, newspapers, articles. Other examples where big data is generated include purchase transaction records, web logs, medical records, military surveillance, video and image archives, and large-scale e-commerce. There is a heightened interest in Big Data and Big Data analysis and the implications they have for businesses. Big Data analysis is the process of examining huge quantities of data to find patterns, correlations, and other useful information that can help firms become more responsive to change, and to make better informed decisions. Big Data analysis can be performed with data mining software. However, the unstructured data sources used for big data analysis are not necessarily suitable for investigation by traditional data mining software.

  • 50 Years of Pascal

    Pascal was easy to teach, and it covered a wide spectrum of applications, which was a significant advantage over Algol, Fortran, and Cobol. The Pascal System was efficient, compact, and easy to use. The language was strongly influenced by the new discipline of structured programming, advocated primarily by E.W. Dijkstra to avert the threatening software crisis (1968).

  • How to use Django Serializers – Linux Hint

    Serializer is used in Django to convert the model instances or querysets into python supported data types that can be easily rendered into JSON, XML, or other formats. The deserialization can also be done by serializers to get back the original data from the serialized data. This feature is available in Django REST Framework. So, the users have to install this framework to use the serializers. Any webpage of the website may contain HTML, CSS, and data from the database tables. But the API does not understand these types of content, and it can understand the raw data only, that is, JSON data. How the serializers can be used to convert the model instance into JSON format has shown in this tutorial.

  • How to use queryset in django – Linux Hint

    Most of the web applications are implemented with the database now. queryset is used in the Django application to retrieve records by filtering or slicing or ordering the database table without changing the original data. The model used Django to create the table in the database. So, the knowledge of using the model in Django is necessary to understand the use of queryset. The main function of the queryset is to iterate the records of database tables by converting them into SQL queries. It can be used from the python command line or by writing the python script to display the browser’s output. The uses of queryset for retrieving data from a database table in different ways have been explained in this tutorial.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 379 [Ed: The usual paradox of developing "openly" while requiring people to get an account with Microsoft and then use proprietary software of Microsoft, which attacks Free software.]

    This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub.

  • What Is BC in a Bash Script? – Linux Hint

    BC, which stands for Basic Calculator, is a command in Bash that is used to provide the functionality of a scientific calculator within a Bash script. This can be useful for scripting with various arithmentic use cases and scenarios. This article shows you how to use BC in a Bash script.

Security Leftovers

  • How often should I rotate my ssh keys?

    My story for today is about ssh and how even public keys, while much better than simple passwords, are still not a perfect solution.

    The danger is credential theft, which is a fancy way of saying “someone stole your private keys.” Back in the 1990s, that problem was pretty far from our minds; Windows 98 didn’t even have the concept of a separate administrator account, never mind the idea of app sandboxing or the inkling that someone might intentionally want to load malware onto your computer and encrypt all your files for ransomware. Those were the days when some people thought ActiveX controls (essentially loading .exe files from web sites) might be a good idea. Actually, maybe even a great idea as long as there was an “are you sure?” dialog box first.

  • 4 of the Best LastPass Alternatives

    LastPass has recently changed its free account usage policy to be only available on one device, and a lot of its users are not happy about it. If you are a LastPass Free user and are looking to switch, here are four great LastPass alternatives you should check out. These services reserve their pricing tiers for more advanced, business-oriented users while still leaving free users with a powerful set of features to safeguard their online accounts data.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ansible-base, keycloak, mumble, and postgresql), Debian (firefox-esr and nodejs), Fedora (dotnet3.1, dotnet5.0, keylime, php-horde-Horde-Text-Filter, radare2, scap-security-guide, and wireshark), openSUSE (postgresql, postgresql13 and python-djangorestframework), Red Hat (Ansible, firefox, and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (firefox and thunderbird), SUSE (php7, postgresql-jdbc, python-cryptography, rpmlint, and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (dnsmasq, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-5.4, linux-azure, linux-azure-5.4, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-5.4, linux-gke-5.4, linux-gkeop, linux-gkeop-5.4, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.4, linux-raspi, linux-raspi-5.4, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-azure-4.15, linux-dell300x, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-4.15, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-hwe-5.8, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-lts-xenial, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-oem-5.10, linux-oem-5.6, screen, and xterm).

  • Biden signs executive order calling for semiconductor supply chain review

    President Biden signed an executive order Wednesday addressing growing concern over a global semiconductor shortage hampering the production of goods like automobiles and smartphones.

    The White House’s executive order directs the federal government to conduct 100-day reviews of supply chains in four sets of products, including computer chips and large capacity batteries, like those used in electric vehicles, according to administration officials.

  • Biden Orders Review to Shore Up Supply Chain Resiliency

    On top of the 100-day review of the four key industries, Biden’s order will also direct yearlong reviews for six sectors: defense, public health, information technology, transportation, energy and food production.

    Biden said his administration will implement the recommendations as soon as they are available. “We're not going to wait for the review to be completed before we start closing the existing gaps,” he said.

  • Technology Executives Say All Evidence Points To Russia In Major Hack Of Computer Networks

    Smith told the committee that the true scope of the intrusions is still unknown because most victims are not legally required to disclose attacks unless they involve sensitive information about individuals.

  • Finnish IT Giant Hit with Ransomware Cyberattack [iophk: Windows TO]

    Norwegian business journal E24 reported the attack on Espoo, Finland-based TietoEVRY on Tuesday, claiming to have spoken with Geir Remman, a communications director at the company. Remman acknowledged technical problems with several services that TietoEVRY provides to 25 customers, which are “due to a ransom attack,” according to the report.

    Remman told E24 that the company considers the attack “a serious criminal act.” TietoEVRY turned off the unspecified services and infrastructure affected “as a preventative measure” until it can recover relevant data, and restart systems “in a controlled manner,” he said.

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Ubuntu Aims For Higher Quality LTS Point Releases - Phoronix

    New restrictions will be in place beginning with Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS this summer to try to enforce better quality releases with less regressions by enforcing better quality control. The change beginning with Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS will require that stable release update (SRU) procedures are followed even for release blockers. This will require that every fix follows the same verification, regression analysis, and aging period process. The tighter quality controls will likely lead to slips in release targets if bugs are found in the release candidates for new point releases, as it will first need to go through the verification and aging process.

  • DFI Partners With Ubuntu For IoT Hardware, OTA Updates - Phoronix

    Most of you probably haven't heard of DFI much in nearly two decades since the days of their colorful "LanParty" motherboards that were well known at the time, but these days they are focused on the industrial computer industry and have now teamed up with Canonical to partake in the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program. DFI is the first industrial computer vendor joining the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program for Ubuntu-certified hardware focused on the Internet of Things and embracing over-the-air software updates.

  • What is MEC ? The telco edge.

    MEC, as ETSI defines it, stands for Multi-access Edge Computing and is sometimes referred to as Mobile edge computing. MEC is a solution that gives content providers and software developers cloud-computing capabilities which are close to the end users. This micro cloud deployed in the edge of mobile operators’ networks has ultra low latency and high bandwidth which enables new types of applications and business use cases. On top of that an application running on MEC can have real-time access to a subset of radio network information that can improve the overall experience.