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Plasma 5.8.2, Applications 16.08.2 and Frameworks 5.27.0 available in Chakra

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The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users.

The Plasma 5.8.2 release provides additional bugfixes to the many new features and changes that were introduced in 5.8.0 aimed at enhancing users' experience:

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KDE Leftovers

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  • Choose Your Own Experience in Plasma 5.8 and beyond

    One of the key points of Plasma is while giving a simple default desktop experience, not limiting the user to that single, pre-packed one size fits all UI.

  • KDevelop 5.0.2 released for Windows and Linux

    Four weeks after the release of KDevelop 5.0.1, we are happy to announce the availability of KDevelop 5.0.2, a second stabilization release in the 5.0 series. We highly recommend to update to version 5.0.2 if you are currently using version 5.0.1 or 5.0.0.

  • Wayland improvements since Plasma 5.8 release

    Two weeks have passed since the Plasma 5.8 release and our Wayland efforts have seen quite some improvements. Some changes went into Plasma 5.8 as bug fixes, some changes are only available in master for the next release. With this blog post I want to highlight what we have improved since Plasma 5.8.

  • Wayland For KDE Plasma 5.9 Should Shape Up Quite Nicely

    Plasma 5.8 was only released at the beginning of October but already there has been a number of Wayland improvements queuing up for the next milestone, Plasma 5.9.

    KWin maintainer Martin Gräßlin wrote a blog post yesterday about some of the early Wayland changes coming for Plasma 5.9. Some of this early work for the next KDE Plasma 5 release includes resize-only borders, global shortcut handling, support for keyboard LEDs via libinput, relative pointer support, the color scheme syncing to the window decoration, window icon improvements, multi-screen improvements, panel imporvements, and more.

  • Autumn Sale in the Krita Shop
  • .

Leslie Zhai Talks 20 Years of KDE in China

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In 2002, as a computer science major university student, I went to a Legal Authoried software store in Wuhan, Guangputun, and bought Redhat7 including four install CDs, three src.rpm CDs and a very exquisite user manual for only RMB 50, because other software for Windows 98 was too expensive to a univerty student! It was my first time to use KDE 3. Yes I chose KDE as my default desktop enviroment, but I tried GNOME of course. Wink Then I tried to migrate my university's course assignment developed in Turbo C to compile with GCC. I used Konsole and VIM to edit my source code, I tried Emacs but I did not know how to make coffee with it, so I switched to VIM Wink and my teachers switched to use Redhat8 instead of Windows 98 when teaching operating system courses.

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Leftovers: KDE

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  • Global Menu Support Is Coming Back to KDE Plasma 5
  • KDE Plasma Looking At Global Menu, Wayland & Mobile For 2017

    KDE Plasma developers talked this week about their plans for the new development cycle and what they want the desktop to look like moving into 2017 and further ahead into 2018.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Desktop to Become a Solid and Reliable Workhorse That Stands Out

    On October 18, 2016, long time KDE software developer Sebastian Kügler published an in-depth story about what's coming to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment in the next couple of years.

    It appears that KDE’s Plasma team had their traditional kickoff meeting on Monday, October 17, to discuss the upcoming features of the next KDE Plasma 5 release, which will be versioned 5.9 and whose release schedule has been already published, as reported earlier right here on this space.

    However, the Plasma team also discussed new ways to improve the quality of the popular desktop environment, as well as make it faster, more stable and reliable than existing versions. Their aim is to bring KDE Plasma to an unprecedented level of quality that will blow the competition away.

    "Our general direction points towards professional use-cases. We want Plasma to be a solid tool, a reliable work-horse that gets out of the way, allowing to get the job done quickly and elegantly. We want it to be faster and of better quality than the competition," said Sebastian Kügler in the blog announcement.

  • Twenty and counting: KDE marks another milestone

    Twenty years ago, a German software developer named Matthias Ettrich kicked off a project to provide Linux users with all the desktop functionality that Windows users had at the time.

    The detailed email inviting participation was sent by Ettrich on 14 October 1996. He outlined his ideas and goals and attracted plenty of interest. The K Desktop Environment project was on its way.

KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop Launches January 31, 2017, Next LTS Arrives August 2018

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After announcing earlier today, October 18, 2016, the release of the second maintenance update to the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, KDE published the release schedule for the upcoming major versions of the project.

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Plasma’s road ahead

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On Monday, KDE’s Plasma team held its traditional kickoff meeting for the new development cycle. We took this opportunity to also look and plan ahead a bit further into the future. In what areas are we lacking, where do we want or need to improve? Where do we want to take Plasma in the next two years?

Our general direction points towards professional use-cases. We want Plasma to be a solid tool, a reliable work-horse that gets out of the way, allowing to get the job done quickly and elegantly. We want it to be faster and of better quality than the competition.

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KDE Plasma 5.8.2 LTS Desktop Environment Out Now for GNU/Linux with Bug Fixes

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Today, October 18, 2016, the KDE project proudly announced the general availability of the second bugfix release for the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, version 5.8.2.

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Linux Kernel 4.8 and KDE Plasma 5.8.1 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed Users

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openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger informed the Tumbleweed community about the latest goodies that landed in the stable software repositories of the rolling release operating system during the past week.

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KDE Leftovers

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  • KDE 1 neon LTS Released: 20 Years of Supporting Freedom

    To celebrate KDE’s 20th birthday today, the great KDE developer Helio Castro has launched KDE 1, the ultimate in long term support software with a 20 year support period.

    KDE neon has now, using the latest containerised continuous integration technologies released KDE1 neon Docker images for your friendly local devop to deploy.

  • How KDE Celebrates 20 Years

    KDE is 20 years old, a community working on beautiful software to free the world and spread privacy, all while having a lot of fun which we do it.

    In cities across the world there are parties being held this weekend to celebrate. As we write the KDE Korea party in Seoul is setting up for some talks and drinks.

  • Happy BDay KDE! \o/
  • Cornelius Schumacher: Twenty Years of KDE

    The new project quickly attracted a group of enthusiastic developers and they pushed out code with a frentic pace. kdelibs-0.0.1 was released in November, containing the first classes KConfig and KApplication. In May 1997 the young project presented at the Linux-Kongress in Würzburg. In August Kalle Dalheimer published the famous article about KDE in the German computer magazine c't which attracted a whole generation of KDE developers to the project. On Jul 12th 1998 KDE 1.0 was done and released. The community had not only implemented a friendly face for Linux but also a bunch of applications while going, including a full web browser.

  • KDE’s 20th anniversary
  • Resurrecting Yakuake

    No use in beating around the bush: Yakuake is currently not in great shape. While the codebase made the jump to KDE Frameworks 5 quite early, it took a long time to get releases out, and the latest still suffers from some annoying, if minor, regressions and bugs. The same is also true for outside code Yakuake heavily relies on - namely Konsole, which unfortunately broke some APIs used by Yakuake, including the one used to invoke the "Manage Profiles" dialog. Meh.

    Alongside this there's a more fundamental problem, which is that Yakuake's basic UI code has not aged well. There's some nice things to say about Yakuake's theming system, including a stable file format with unbroken backwards compatibility for more than a decade. But that also hints at the fact that it was designed for systems of that era, and for example can't handle scaling to hi-dpi displays at all.

  • Kdenlive 16.08.2 released
  • KDevelop for Windows: Official 5.0.1 beta installer available now
  • Kubuntu 16.10 Released!
  • Qt 5.6.2 on FreeBSD
  • Kube: Accounts

    Kube is a next generation communication and collaboration client, built with QtQuick on top of a high performance, low resource usage core called Sink.
    It provides online and offline access to all your mail, contacts, calendars, notes, todo’s etc.
    Kube has a strong focus on usability and the team works with designers and Ux experts from the ground up, to build a product that is not only visually appealing but also a joy to use.

KDE Restoration Project

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  • Make your Linux desktop look like it’s from 1998 with the KDE Restoration Project

    The KDE project was founded in 1996, and since then has been an important part of the Linux landscape. In addition to the well known desktop environment, it also includes a number of essential utilities and tools.

    Now, a project wants to revive what KDE looked like in 1998, when the first ever release version of KDE came out.

  • Devs Mark KDE’s 20th Birthday By Re-Releasing KDE 1!

    Go fetch those blue birthday cake candles you have stashed away cos today, October 14, marks the 20th birthday of KDE. Yup, it’s the KDE project’s 20th birthday. And to help mark the mammoth milestone the KDE Restoration Project iso re-releasing KDE 1!

  • KDE Project releases KDE 1 !

    The KDE project is proud to announce his first public release, after 20 years of hard development from a team of multi cultural developers around the world.

    Was an amazing effort of the original dinosaurs to make this beautiful piece of software be available on the hands of our beloved supporters

    Here’s the screenshots on the current status of the desktop

    All teams will celebrate PARTIES all over the world trough this day, and you will be welcome to join any near you.

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More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

  • New details revealed about future Samsung QLED TVs
    Samsung has unveiled the latest details of his stunning, next-generation TV. Named SUHD Qualmark Red TV, it’s based on the proprietary technology Samsung has pioneered: QLED, long for Quantum dot Light-Emitting Diode. According to sources from Samsung Electronics, the product will cover the high-end spectrum of the market, proposing itself as the top premium TV produced by the South Korean company. This move, which confirms Samsung’s continuos attention to innovation, proves the drive of the enterprise on delivering the highest quality products with consistency while maintaining a strong focus on research and development.
  • Samsung Z2 Officially Launched in Indonesia
    The Samsung Z2 launch which was initially planned for the month of September in Indonesia, however that didn’t turn out to be true. Samsung Indonesia have finally launched the Z2 in the country at an official launch event. The launch took place at the country’s capital Jakarta on Wednesday that is the 19th of October. The smartphone has been priced at 899,000 Indonesian Rupiah ($70 approx.). Samsung are also bundling a free Batik back cover with the smartphone for the early customers. This is also the first Tizen smartphone to be launched in Indonesia.
  • Game: Candy Funny for your Tizen smartphone
    Here is another puzzle type game that has recently hit the Tizen Store for you to enjoy. “Candy Funny” is brought to you by developer Julio Cesar and is very similar to Candy Crush. You have 300 levels available to play and all levels have 3 stars , the number of stars shows how good or bad you actually are. You don’t have much time to accumulate the highest score you can and unlock further screens.
  • Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016 Game for Tizen Smartphones
    Games2Win India Pvt. Ltd. ( an Indian app development company has more than 800 proprietary apps and games in all smartphone and tablet platforms. Now, they have 51 million downloads of their apps and games in all platforms. They have already got 8 games in the Tizen Store and today they added a new cricket game “Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016”.
  • Slender Man Game Series now available on Tizen Store

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Rivals Red Hat, Mirantis Announce New OpenStack Partnerships
    The cloud rivals both announce new telco alliances as competition in the cloud market heats up. Red Hat and Mirantis both announced large agreements this week that bring their respective OpenStack technologies to carrier partners. The news comes ahead of the OpenStack Summit that kicks off in Barcelona, Spain, on Oct. 24. Red Hat announced on Oct. 19 that it has a new OpenStack partnership with telco provider Ericsson. "Ericsson and Red Hat recognize that we share a common belief in using open source to transform the telecommunications industry, and we are collaborating to bring more open solutions, from OpenStack-based clouds to software-defined networking and infrastructure, to customers," Radhesh Balakrishnan, general manager of OpenStack at Red Hat, told eWEEK.
  • Turbulent Week Ends, How Did This Stock Fare: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Flatpak; the road to CI/CD for desktop applications?
    In this presentation I will introduce Flatpak and how it changes the software distribution model for Linux. In short it will explain the negatives of using packages, how Flatpak solves this, and how to create your own applications and distribute them for use with Flatpak. This presentation was given at the GNOME 3.22 release party, organized by the Beijing GNOME User Group.
  • The who in the where?
    The job is like many other roles called “Community Manager” or “Community Lead.” That means there is a focus on metrics and experiences. One role is to try ensure smooth forward movement of the project towards its goals. Another role is to serve as a source of information and motivation. Another role is as a liaison between the project and significant downstream and sponsoring organizations. In Fedora, this means I help the Fedora Project Leader. I try to be the yen to his yang, the zig to his zag, or the right hand to his right elbow. In all seriousness, it means that I work on a lot of the non-engineering focused areas of the Fedora Project. While Matthew has responsibility for the project as a whole I try to think about users and contributors and be mechanics of keeping the project running smoothly.

Development News

  • Eclipse Foundation Collaboration Yields Open Source Technology for Computational Science
    The gap between the computational science and open source software communities just got smaller – thanks to a collaboration among national laboratories, universities and industry.
  • PyCon India 2016
    “This is awesome!”, this was my first reaction when I boarded my first flight to Delhi. I was having trouble in finding a proper accommodation Kushal, Sayan and Chandan helped me a lot in that part, I finally got honour of bunking with Sayan , Subho and Rtnpro which I will never forget. So, I landed and directly went to JNU convention center. I met the whole Red Hat intern gang . It was fun to meet them all. I had proposed Pagure for Dev Sprint and I pulled in Vivek to do the same. The dev sprint started and there was no sign of Vivek or Saptak, Saptak is FOSSASIA contributor and Vivek contributes to Pagure with me. Finally it was my turn to talk about Pagure on stage , it was beautiful the experience and the energy. We got a lot of young and new contributors and we tried to guide them and make them send at least one PR. One of them was lucky enough to actually make a PR and it got readily merged.
  • Hack This: An Overdue Python Primer
    In writing the most recent Hack This ("Scrape the Web with Beautiful Soup") I again found myself trapped between the competing causes of blog-brevity and making sure everything is totally clear for non-programmers. It's a tough spot! Recapping every little Python (the default language of Hack This) concept is tiring for everyone, but what's the point in the first place if no one can follow what's going on? This post is then intended then as a sort of in-between edition of Hack This, covering a handful of Python features that are going to recur in pretty much every programming tutorial that we do under the Hack This name. A nice thing about Python is that it makes many things much clearer than is possible in almost any other language.
  • Why I won’t be attending Systems We Love
    Here’s one way to put it: to me, Bryan Cantrill is the opposite of another person I admire in operating systems (whom I will leave unnamed). This person makes me feel excited and welcome and safe to talk about and explore operating systems. I’ve never seen them shame or insult or put down anyone. They enthusiastically and openly talk about learning new systems concepts, even when other people think they should already know them. By doing this, they show others that it’s safe to admit that they don’t know something, which is the first step to learning new things. They are helping create the kind of culture I want in systems programming – the kind of culture promoted by Papers We Love, which Bryan cites as the inspiration for Systems We Love. By contrast, when I’m talking to Bryan I feel afraid, cautious, and fearful. Over the years I worked with Bryan, I watched him shame and insult hundreds of people, in public and in private, over email and in person, in papers and talks. Bryan is no Linus Torvalds – Bryan’s insults are usually subtle, insinuating, and beautifully phrased, whereas Linus’ insults tend towards the crude and direct. Even as you are blushing in shame from what Bryan just said about you, you are also admiring his vocabulary, cadence, and command of classical allusion. When I talked to Bryan about any topic, I felt like I was engaging in combat with a much stronger foe who only wanted to win, not help me learn. I always had the nagging fear that I probably wouldn’t even know how cleverly he had insulted me until hours later. I’m sure other people had more positive experiences with Bryan, but my experience matches that of many others. In summary, Bryan is supporting the status quo of the existing culture of systems programming, which is a culture of combat, humiliation, and domination. [...] He gaily recounts the time he gave a highly critical keynote speech at USENIX, bashfully links to a video praising him at a Papers We Love event, elegantly puts down most of the existing operating systems research community, and does it all while using the words “ancillary,” “verve,” and “quadrennial.” Once you know the underlying structure – a layer cake of vituperation and braggadocio, frosted with eloquence – you can see the same pattern in most of his writing and talks.

Android Leftovers