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KDE

Qbs 1.13 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

We are happy to announce version 1.13.0 of the Qbs build tool. This is the last version to be released under the auspices of the Qt Company, but certainly not the least.

Qbs projects can now make use of pkg-config modules. Syntax-wise, the same dependency mechanism as for Qbs’ own modules is used. For instance, on a typical Linux machine with an OpenSSL development package installed, the following is enough to let a Qbs project build against it...

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digiKam 6.1.0 is released

Filed under
KDE
Software

Dear digiKam fans and users, after the first digiKam 6 release published in February 2019, we received lots of user feedback to consolidate this important stage of this project started 2 years ago. We are proud to quickly announce the new digiKam 6.1.0, with plenty of new features and fixes.

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Qt 5.9.8 Released

Filed under
KDE

Qt 5.9.8 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.9.8 does not add any new functionality, but provides security fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.9.7, the new Qt 5.9.8 contains multiple security fixes, updates to some of the 3rd party modules and close to 20 bug fixes. In total there are around 130 changes in Qt 5.9.8 compared to Qt 5.9.7. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.9.8.

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Some theming fixes to arrive with Plasma 5.16

Filed under
KDE

One of the things which makes Plasma so attractive is the officially supported option to customize also the style, and that beyond colors and wallpaper, to allow users to personalize the look to their likes. And designers have picked up on that and did a good set of custom designs (store.kde.org lists at the time of writing 454 themes).

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Qt/KDE: KDE Plasma 5.16 Pre-Beta and Qt Creator 4.9.0

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Pre-Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are having a look at the pre-Beta version of KDE Plasma 5.16. It still have a few bugs but it is expected.

  • Qt Creator 4.9.0 released with language support, QML support, profiling and much more

    Yesterday, the team behind Qt released the latest version, Qt Creator 4.9.0, a cross-platform software development framework for embedded and desktop applications. This release comes with programming language support, changes to UI, QML support and much more.

  • Qt Creator hits 4.9 with ever-growing language skills

    Qt Creator 4.9 has been released, extending support for the language server protocol and improving diagnostics for C++ developers.

    The language server protocol was added in version 4.8 but can now work with document outlines, find usages and – using code actions – lets the language server suggest fixes or refactoring actions at a specific place in a piece of code. The custom highlighting file parser, meanwhile, has been replaced with KSyntaxHighlighting – the library also used in KDE.

    Another slew of changes improve C++ support, with – amongst other things – an option to format code instead of only indenting it, a tooltip button for copying and ignoring diagnostics, and an option to synchronise ‘Include Hierarchy’ with the current document.

  • Qt Creator 4.9 uses KSyntaxHighlighting

    As you can read in the official Creator 4.9.0 release announcement, Qt Creator now uses the KSyntaxHighlighting Framework for providing the generic highlighting.

    This is a nice step for the wider adoption of this MIT licensed part of the KDE Frameworks.

    And this is not just an one-way consumption of our work.

    The framework got actively patches back that make it more usable for other consumers, too, like Kate ;=)

Qt 5.12.3 Released

Filed under
KDE

Qt 5.12.3, the third patch release of Qt 5.12 LTS, is released today. While not adding new features, the Qt 5.12.3 release provides a number of bug fixes, as well as performance and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.12.2, the new Qt 5.12.3 provides almost 200 bug fixes. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.12.3.

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NVIDIA EGLStreams Support Merged Into KWin For KDE Plasma 5.16

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
KDE

Quite a surprise this Monday morning is finding that KDE's EGLStreams back-end for the KWin Wayland compositor has been merged! The KDE Plasma 5.16 release this summer will thus introduce support for running the KDE Plasma Wayland session with the proprietary NVIDIA Linux driver stack.

At the end of last year it was shared that NVIDIA was developing an EGLStreams back-end for KWin, similar to the efforts in getting EGLStreams support into GNOME's Mutter compositor. By late January is when the proof-of-concept code for KWin with EGLStreams entered review. Following months of review, the back-end has been merged into KWin Git.

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Also: [Krita] Interview with Missy

Qt Creator 4.9.0 released

Filed under
KDE

In Qt Creator 4.8 we introduced experimental support for the language server protocol. This enables editing support for a wide range of programming languages through a common protocol. In 4.9 we add support for the document outline, find usages, and also for code actions, which allow the language server to suggest fixes or refactoring actions at a specified place in the code. If the language server of your favorite programming language supports these features, they are now available in Qt Creator as well. Enable the LanguageClient plugin in Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and configure your server in Tools > Options > Language Client to check it out.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.9 Released With Expanded Language Server Protocol Support

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 66

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 66

    Here’s week 66 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative, and some major features have landed!

  • Dolphin & Other KDE Utilities To Begin Displaying File Creation Times On Linux

    With KDE Frameworks 5.58, the Dolphin file manager and other KDE applications will finally begin displaying file creation dates/times as a long sought after feature on Linux systems.

    This support within KDE for displaying file creation times is as a result of the low-level plumbing that went into the kernel back in 2017 with the statx system call for extended file information. Statx support has been wired into EXT4 and Btrfs and other popular file-systems for being able to provide information like the file creation time rather than just the last modified time.

GNOME Desktop and KDE: ash to Dock Extension on GNOME 3.32, New Review of KDE Neon and Kate History of KDE 4 Porting

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • The Beauty of Dash to Dock Extension on GNOME 3.32

    You may find many articles on the net guiding you to install Dash To Dock extension on GNOME. But there are very few ones to speak more about experimenting with it. This article explores the features of this one Extension to show you possibilities it can give to your GNOME 3 desktop environment. You can enable click to raise/minimize window, change the icon size, color the dock or make it transparent, make the dock to mimic Unity Launcher, reposition it to any edge of your screen, etc. You will find my experiments below, like, make everything looks larger to help friends with vision impairments, using GNOME 3.32 desktop on GNU/Linux. Finally, happy tweaking!

  • Review: KDE Neon
  • Kate History - KDE 4 Porting

    During my web site upgrade, I reviewed the old stuff I had hosted on my long gone web sites but still archived here locally. An interesting thing I stumbled on are the KDE 3 -> 4 porting screenshots of Kate I saved in 2005.

    They actually show pretty nicely how far we have gone since 2005 with our development stack.

    The KDE 3 -> 4 transition was a large hassle. It did take weeks of work just to get Kate back into an usable state.

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Nebra Anybeam turns your Raspberry Pi into a pocket home cinema projector

TVs are available to buy in truly huge sizes these days, and with 4K (and upwards) resolution, movies and TV shows really come to life. But there’s something even more magical about watching a film projected onto a screen or a wall. With the right setup, it can be like having a cinema in your home. You don’t necessarily need to spend a fortune on a projector though. Nebra Anybeam can turn your Raspberry Pi into a cinema projector that you can slip into your pocket and take anywhere. Read more Also: Nebra AnyBeam - world's smallest pocket cinema projectors

Back in the Day: UNIX, Minix and Linux

I don't remember my UCSD email address, but some years later, I was part of the admin team on the major UUCP hub hplabs, and my email address was simply hplabs!taylor. Somewhere along the way, networking leaped forward with TCP/IP (we had TCP/IP "Bake Offs" to test interoperability). Once we had many-to-many connectivity, it was clear that the "bang" notation was unusable and unnecessarily complicated. We didn't want to worry about routing, just destination. Enter the "@" sign. I became taylor@hplabs.com. Meanwhile, UNIX kept growing, and the X Window System from MIT gained popularity as a UI layer atop the UNIX command line. In fact, X is a public domain implementation of the windowing system my colleagues and I first saw at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. PARC had computers where multiple programs were on the screen simultaneously in "windows", and there was a pointer device used to control them—so cool. Doug Englebart was inspired too; he went back to Stanford Research Institute and invented the mouse to make control of those windows easier. At Apple, they also saw what was being created at PARC and were inspired to create the Macintosh with all its windowing goodness. Still, who doesn't love the command line, as Ritchie and Kernighan had originally designed it in the early days of UNIX? (UNIX, by the way, is a wordplay on a prior multiuser operating system called Multics, but that's another story.) Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • USB Support In Chrome OS 75 Will Make Linux Incredibly Versatile
    Chrome OS Linux instances are on the cusp of becoming immensely more useful and versatile based on a recent change spotted by Keith I Myers in the beta-specific Developer Channel following an update to version 75.0.3759.4. That's because while the update inevitably introduced some new bugs that will need to be squashed before a final release, it also included full support for USB devices on the Crostini side of the equation.
  • Old computer? Linux can give it a new lease on life
    The operating system is called Linux and was created in 1991 by Finnish student Linus Torvalds. He released Linux as open source which meant that any good programmer could tinker with it and improve upon the original. Today Linux is a popular free alternative for Windows and Mac computers and used by millions of people. The beauty is that Linux requires much less processing power and memory than Windows and is perfect for older computers.
  • At Least 27% Of Gentoo's Portage Can Be Easily LTO Optimized For Better Performance
    entooLTO is a configuration overlay for Gentoo's overlay to make it easy to enable Link Time Optimizations (LTO) and other compiler optimizations for enabling better performance out of the Gentoo packages. GentooLTO appears to be inspired in part by the likes of Clear Linux who employ LTO and other compiler optimization techniques like AutoFDO for yielding better performance than what is conventionally shipped by Linux distributions. The GentooLTO developers and users have wrapped up their survey looking at how practical this overlay configuration is on the massive Portage collection.  The initial GentooLTO survey has been going on since last October and they have collected data from more than 30 users. The survey found that of the Gentoo Portage 18,765 packages as of writing, at least 5,146 of them are working with the GentooLTO configuration.