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Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.11.5, KDE Applications 17.12 and Qt 5.10

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If you're using Chakra GNU/Linux, which is a rolling release computer operating system where you install once and receive updates forever, chances are you can upgrade its components to the recently released KDE Plasma 5.11.5 desktop environment, as well as KDE Applications 17.12.0 and KDE Frameworks 5.41.0 software suits, all built against the latest Qt 5.10.0 application framework.

"You can now upgrade to the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series, built against the brand new Qt 5.10.0," says Neofytos Kolokotronis in the forum announcement. "[KDE] Applications 17.12 is the first release of a new series that focuses on introducing enhancements and new features. As always with stability updates, Plasma 5.11.53 and Frameworks 5.41.02 include a month’s worth of bug fixes and improvements."

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Software: Eddy, KDE, and GNU

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  • Eddy - Easily Install Debian Packages on Elementary

    Eddy is a simple Debian package management GUI tool in Elementary OS that allows installation of Debian packages by dragging and dropping Debian files onto a GUI window. The tool can be installed straight from App Center platform or installed from source. Let's see how we can install from source on Elementary 0.4.1 Loki.

    Installing from AppCenter is the preferred way of installing Eddy since it contains the stable, tested version of the application. Compiling from source provides you with the latest "commit" with the newest functionality that may not be released as a part of an update in AppCenter or in general.

  • Season Of KDE 2018

    It’s been 5 months since I came to GCompris community, but it feels it was a few days back. I came here as a newbie in open source, not even knowing how to ask sensible questions (that’s very important which I learned during my works in GCompris), not even knowing how and where to begin.

    But I deeply thank our awesome community and helpful mentors, Johnny Jazeix, Timothee Giet, Divyam Madaan, Emmanuel Charruau and Rudra Nil Basu who kept guiding me and helped me constantly in my tasks through which I learned a lot of things, which otherwise I could have never got the opportunity to learn.


    I will continue to contribute to GCompris for a long time and help our software grow, as much as I can.

  • Beginning 2018

    2017 began with the once-in-a-lifetime trip to India to speak at That was amazing enough, but the trip to a local village, and visiting the Kaziranga National Park were too amazing for words.

    Literal highlight of last year were the eclipse and trip to see it with my son Thomas, and Christian and Hailey's wedding, and the trip to participate with my daughter Anne, while also spending some time with son Paul, his wife Tara and my grandson Oscar. This summer I was able to spend a few days in Brooklyn with Colin and Rory as well on my way to Akademy. So 2017 was definitely worth living through!


    First, I'm so happy that soon Kubuntu will again be distributing 17.10 images next week. Right now we're in testing in preparation for that; pop into IRC if you'd like to help with the testing (#kubuntu-devel). next week!

  • Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About bash


    Here I’ve focussed on the things that either confused me or increased my power and productivity in bash significantly, and tried to communicate them (as in my book) in a way that emphasises getting the understanding right.

  • Emacs for Science


    I typically cover software packages that do actual calculations to advance scientific knowledge, but here I'm exploring a slightly stranger tool in the arsenal of scientific computation.

    Emacs is a text editor that has almost all the functionality of an operating system. A collection of enhancements and configuration settings are available bundled under the name of scimax. Being an Emacs user myself, I was surprised I'd never heard of it before now. This project has been in development for some time, but it recently has started to find wider attention.

KDE: Latte Dock and LibAlkimia

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  • Latte Dock, KDE Fundraising 2017

    Latte Dock is preparing its next stable version (0.7.3) which you will be able to get the next days and of course new features at its git version. I wont describe now the fixes, improvements and new features both versions contain because this article is for another reason.

  • LibAlkimia 7.0 released

    LibAlkimia is a base library that contains support for financial applications based on the Qt C++ framework.

    One of its main features is the encapsulation of The GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library (GMP) and so providing a simple object to be used  representing monetary values in the form of rational numbers. All the mathematical details are hidden inside the AlkValue object.


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  • Qt Cloud Messaging API Available for Embedded Systems

    Challenges with cloud messaging for embedded devices has inspired the Kaltiot & SnowGrains teams to create a cross-platform Qt API which enables easy push messaging from and to embedded devices. The API is called the Qt Cloud Messaging API and it is built with flexibility and extensibility in mind.

    We have decided to target other Qt areas, too, and make the API easily extensible to any service provider instead of being for embedded only. This enables developers to use the same API for both mobile and desktop development.

  • Zanshin 0.5.0 is out: 2018 will be organized!

    We are happy and proud to announce the immediate availability of Zanshin 0.5.0.

    After 0.4.0 one year and a half ago and 0.4.1 last year (which wasn't publicly announced), this new release introduce new features. The 0.4 series was mostly about the Qt 5 port and stabilization, now we can be a bit more ambitious again.

  • GNOME 3.28 Removes Option to Put Icons on the Desktop

    If you’re among the many GNOME Shell users who like to put icons on the desktop, brace yourself for change

    Developers working on the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment have removed the ‘desktop’ feature currently used to display and manage files, folders and attached drives kept on the desktop workspace.

Plasma 5.11.5 bugfix release available in backports PPA for Artful Aardvark 17.10

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The 5th and final bugfix update (5.11.5) of the Plasma 5.11 series is now available for users of Kubuntu Artful Aardvark 17.10 to install via our Backports PPA.

This update also includes an upgrade of KDE Frameworks to version 5.41.

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Also: Kubuntu 17.10 Users Can Now Update to the KDE Plasma 5.11.5 Desktop Environment

KDE: Neon and KMyMoney

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KDE Plasma 5.13 Preview

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  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Environment to Feature Better Web Browser Integration

    While many are waiting impatiently for the release of the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment, the KDE community announced today on Twitter a new feature of KDE Plasma 5.13.

    Yes, you're reading it right, we're talking about KDE Plasma 5.13, the version of the Linux desktop environment that will be coming after KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS, which is hitting the streets at the end of the month, on January 30, 2018.

    A short-lived branch, KDE Plasma 5.13 will be released on June 12, 2018, and it appears that it brings better web browser integration by allowing users to control and monitor various aspects of their web browser like playback, downloads, and tabs.

  • Better Browser-Desktop Integration Coming For KDE Plasma 5.13

    One of the new features being worked on by KDE developers in the new year is better desktop integration with web browsers.

    Expected to arrive with Plasma 5.13 is better desktop integration with Chrome/Chromium browsers and potentially Firefox too (there is an experimental Firefox add-on here). From the Plasma shell even with a minimized browser window you can now start/pause/mute any playing content, monitor browser downloads from the notification panel, and also find open browser tabs via Plasma's "Run Command" utility.

KDE Plasma 5.11.5 Linux Desktop Environment Released as the Last in the Series

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Coming one and a half months after the KDE Plasma 5.11.4 release, KDE Plasma 5.11.5 is here with more than 30 bug fixes and improvements across various of its components, such as the KWin window and composite manager, KScreenlocker screen locker, Oxygen and Breeze themes, Plasma Discover package manager, as well as Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, and Plasma Addons.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.11.5. Plasma 5.11 was released in January with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience," reads today's announcement. "This release adds a three week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important."

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KDE and GNOME: Qt 6.0, Auditing Licenses in KDE Frameworks FreeBSD Packaging, Richer Shadows, Endless and GTK+

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  • With Qt 6.0 Development To Heat Up, 2018 Should Be Exciting For Qt

    Qt 6.0 planning has begun and we should be hearing more about this next major tool-kit update as the year goes on. Here's some of what we can expect from Qt in the near future.

  • Auditing Licenses in KDE Frameworks FreeBSD Packaging

    FreeBSD is getting more serious about license metadata in the packages produced by the project — that is, the binary distribution of software produced from licensed source code. A lot of software in FreeBSD “proper” is (naturally) BSD-licensed, and a lot of Free Software packaged by FreeBSD is (also naturally) GPL licensed. But the different licenses carry different obligations, so it’s good to keep track of the exact licensing applied to each bit of software.

  • Richer Shadows

    We decided to make them larger and deeper by default, and center them horizontally so that there’s a shadow on the left edges of windows and menus as well. I was honored to produce the patch, and I’m happy to report that it’s been accepted and merged! Starting in Plasma 5.12, here’s how shadows will look...

  • Have a great 2018!

    Workwise, it’s been another very busy year at Endless. I am still in charge of the App Center (our GNOME Software fork) and doing what I can to tame this beast. Endless’ mission has always been a noble one, but with the current direction of the world it’s even more significant and needed; so I will continue to give my best and hope we can keep making a difference in less fortunate regions.

  • GTK+ Custom Widgets: General Definitions

    Writing a GTK+ custom widget with is Vala easy. First all create an XML definition with a top level container widget and a set of child ones. You can use Glade to do so. This is not a tutorial for Glade, so let start at with an already designed template UI file.

KDE: Plasma Mobile/postmarketOS, Kubuntu 17.10, and 2017 With KDE

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  • postmarketOS Update: Now Runs Plasma Mobile/Lune UI/Xfce On Real Devices

    In the last week of December, I came across a post on Reddit/r/KDE that showed a postmarketOS device with Plasma Mobile. Just recently, the team had published the latest blog update on their website, listing out the recent developments and breakthroughs achieved during the last months.

    Before going ahead and reading the developments, I’ll advise you to read this introductory post on postmarketOS if you’re not aware of the project.

  • Kubuntu 17.10[fix]: Fonts Looks Too Big After Enabling Nvidia’s Proprietary Driver?

    These days my main operating system is Kubuntu 17.10 because I’ve switched to KDE as my desktop environment. However, since my Asus laptop comes with a hybrid GPU setup, I decided to enable the more capable Nvidia GPU by installing its proprietary driver. Once I enabled it on Kubuntu 17.10, then after rebooting, I noticed that the fonts looks slightly (unnecessarily) bigger on the desktop and on the application windows. Luckily I was able to fix it quite easily. So if you’re having the same issue, this post will help you out for fixing it.

    To be honest, I rarely use the Nvidia GPU. And the only reason why I installed and enabled the proprietary driver was to see if it would break the user auto-login feature. This was purely out of my curiosity because that’s what happened in GNOME, while I reviewed Ubuntu 17.10.

  • A roadtrip through 2017 with KDE

    Happy New Year to all! The year 2017 has been a rollercoaster, to be honest. Well, it was rich and prosperous year regarding in technical terms. It was a beautiful year of great learning, splendid travel and got to network with some fantastic folks all around the globe.

    The best reason for making this 2017 incredible for me is KDE. One of the exciting community I have ever seen! It all started at the end of 2016, I got intrigued by the Tagline of KDE, “Experience freedom”. I started contributing to various projects inside KDE. My initial start was with Konsole, system settings, KIO and various educational suite programs. Moving on, I came across a student program organized by KDE named KDE-SoK and I was selected for it, yay!!!

    The project was with KStars(KDE’s amateur astronomy software which provides real-time and an accurate graphical simulation of the night sky, from any location on Earth.) to collect a new set of images from NASA/ESO catalogs along with orientation and pixel scale (arcsecs/pixel) from the whole set of Messier Catalog (which is a collection of 110 astronomy objects in the night sky). Images were processed for overlay in KStars using OpenCV, so to have transparency and to modulate according to the software.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Facebook-Mozilla Rift, MDN, No More Notifications (If You Want)

  • Mozilla stops Facebook advertising, demands privacy changes
    It’s probably not top of Mark Zuckerberg’s worry list this week but Mozilla Corporation, developer of the Firefox browser, is officially unhappy with Facebook.
  • Results of the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” SEO experiment
    The next SEO experiment I’d like to discuss results for is the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” experiment. In this experiment, performed through December into early January, involved selecting two of the top search terms that resulted in MDN being included in search results—one of them where MDN is highly-placed but not at #1, and one where MDN is listed far down in the search results despite having good content available. The result is a comparison of the quality of our content and our SEO against other sites that document these technology areas. With that information in hand, we can look at the competition’s content and make decisions as to what changes to make to MDN to help bring us up in the search rankings.
  • No More Notifications (If You Want)
    Online, your attention is priceless. That’s why every site in the universe wants permission to send you notifications about new stuff. It can be distracting at best and annoying at worst. The latest version of Firefox for desktop lets you block those requests and many others.

EUPL planned actions

A revised set of guidelines and recommendations on the use of the open source licence EUPL v1.2 published by the Commission on 19 May 2017 will be developed, involving the DIGIT unit B.3 (Reusable Solutions) and the JRC 1.4 (Joint Research Centre – Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer). The existing licence wizard will be updated. New ways of promoting public administrations' use of open source will be investigated and planned (such as hackathons or app challenges on open source software). The target date for the release of this set of guidelines on the use of the European Public Licence EUPL v1.2, including a modified Licence Wizard, is planned Q2 2018. Read more

Security: Dropbox, FUD, CNCF, 'Cloud'

  • Dropbox has some genuinely great security reporting guidelines, but reserves the right to jail you if you disagree

    Dropbox's position, however reasonable in many of its aspects, is woefully deficient, because the company reserves the right to invoke DMCA 1201 and/or CFAA and other tools that give companies the power to choose who can say true things abour mistakes they've made.

    This is not normal. Before DRM in embedded software and cloud connectivity, became routine there were no restrictions on who could utter true words about defects in a product. [...]

  • Hackers Infect Linux Servers With Monero Miner via 5-Year-Old Vulnerability [Ed: A five-year-old vulnerability implies total neglect by sysadmins, not a GNU/Linux weakness]
    Attackers also modified the local cron jobs to trigger a "watchd0g" Bash script every three minutes, a script that checked to see if the Monero miner was still active and restarted XMRig's process whenever it was down.
  • GitHub: Our dependency scan has found four million security flaws in public repos [Ed: No, GitHub just ran a scan for old versions being used and reused. It cannot do this for proprietary software, but the issues are there and the risks are no better.]
    GitHub says its security scan for old vulnerabilities in JavaScript and Ruby libraries has turned up over four million bugs and sparked a major clean-up by project owners. The massive bug-find total was reached within a month of the initiative's launch in November, when GitHub began scanning for known vulnerabilities in certain popular open-source libraries and notifying project owners that they should be using an updated version.
  • Envoy CNCF Project Completes Security Audit, Delivers New Release
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has begun a process of performing third-party security audits for its projects, with the first completed audit coming from the Envoy proxy project. The Envoy proxy project was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic.
  • Hybrid cloud security: Emerging lessons [Ed: 'Cloud' and security do not belong in the same headline because 'cloud' is a data breach, typically involving a company giving all its (and customers') data to some spying giant abroad]

A Look At The Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux

The latest in our Windows versus Linux benchmarking is looking at the relative performance impact on both Linux and Windows of their Spectre and Meltdown mitigation techniques. This round of tests were done on Windows 10 Pro, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Clear Linux when having an up-to-date system on each OS where there is Spectre/Meltdown protection and then repeating the same benchmarks after reverting/disabling the security functionality. Read more