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KDE

KDE4 Productivity Tips and Tricks

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KDE

Time is money, so I set up my main PC for maximum productivity. Everything I use the most is no more than a click away, and I have a batch of fave useful CLI and keyboard shortcuts and commands. Life is too short to wade through inefficient GUIs. I like all Linux graphical environments, and the one I keep coming back to the most is KDE. I loved it when it was pixely and not very pretty and had tons of customizability, and now it is sleek and gorgeous and has tons of customizability.

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HighDPI in KDE Applications

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KDE

Recently I was asked about the state of High DPI in KDE Applications, by someone with a fancy screen.

In Plasma we have our own solution for solving the HighDPI problem, as we were working with new code where we provide the styling, this is all fairly straightforward. However, this doesn't work for applications which have a lot of existing code we need to bring this feature to.

This upcoming release of Qt (5.4) brings us everything we need to support High DPI in our applications. It's not going to be useful for end users just now, but this is a time where we need each and every developer to start getting interested and making sure their applications are ready.

Support requires at least one line of change in every application.

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The New and Improved KDE Plasma 5.1.1 Desktop Is Out

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KDE

The KDE Community has announced that Plasma 5.1.1 has been released and it should be considered a maintenance update. The latest version in this series was made available only a month ago and the developers are moving very fast.

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KDE Ships November Bugfix Release of Plasma 5

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KDE

Today KDE releases a bugfix update to Plasma 5, versioned 5.1.1. Plasma 5 was released in July with many feature refinements and streamlining the existing codebase of KDE's popular desktop for developers to work on for the years to come.

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Q&A with Aaron Seigo: How Kolab Systems Uses Open Source and Linux

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KDE
Interviews

I’ve been involved since around 2001, during which time I’ve worked on a number of areas within the community. I ended up maintaining the panels and parts of the desktop shell in KDE’s 3.x desktop and from there ended up doing the ground-up redesign of the shell we now know as Plasma.

That introduced some radical (at the time) concepts such as device-independent UIs, strong business/UI separation, animation rich interfaces, visual integration of desktop services and visual distinction between the desktop shell and applications running in them.

Outside of technical work, I was also president of KDE’s global non-profit foundation, KDE e.V., and oversaw improvements in how we manage intellectual property, standardizing developer sprints, rigorous reporting and more. It was during this time that I was named one of the top 50 most influential people in IT by silicon.com.

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Kubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn - That's better

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KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Kubuntu has one definite advantage. It's predictable. Predictable in the sense that it will never give you a fully satisfying experience out of the box, and it will do its best to be controversial, bi-polar and restrained by default. You get a very good and modern system, but then it's almost purposefully crippled by boredom, a conservative choice of programs and missing functionality. Why, oh why. It could be such a shiny star.

Utopic Unicorn is a pretty solid release, but it does suffer from some alarming issues. The graphics stack, first and foremost. Desktop effects are also missing, and Samba printing is simply disappointing. The rest worked fine, the system was robust, there's good evidence of polish and improvements, but then it lacks pride and color. I would say 8/10, but that's not enough to win people's hearts. We've all been there, every six months, so something new is needed. Maybe Plasma 5? Aha! Stay tuned.

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Franklin Weng: The strength behind open source is the strength of contributing

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KDE
Interviews
OSS

Franklin is a 39 year old FOSS activist based in Taipei. He has coordinated KDE's zh_TW translation team since 2006, and is the core developer of ezgo (Chinese), a compilation of educational software used by schools all over Taiwan. ezgo, which in its Linux installation uses KDE by default, blends more than 100 free software applications into one localized, easy to use package.

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Release of KDE Frameworks 5.4.0

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KDE

KDE Frameworks are 60 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

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Early announce: Qt4 removal in Jessie+1

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KDE

We the Debian Qt/KDE Team want to early-announce [maintainer warning] our decision to remove Qt4 from Jessie+1. This warning is mostly targeted at upstreams.

Qt4 has been deprecated since Qt5's first release on December 19th 2012, that means almost two years ago!

So far we had bugfixes-only releases, but upstream has announced that they will end this support on august 2015. This already means we will have to do a special effort from that point on for Jessie in case RC bugs appears, so having it in Jessie+1 is simply a non-go.

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Plasma-nm 0.9.3.5 release

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KDE

I just want to inform you (those who are still running KDE 4) that we released a new version of your favorite network applet. This new release brings to you many bug fixes and should make your life easier. We really recommend to update to the new version as we, not intentionally, introduced some new issues in the previous version. Together with the new release of plasma-nm we also released our libnm-qt library which is also needed if you want to have fixes from plasma-nm properly working.

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