Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Three Slots Awarded to Krita for Google Summer of Code
  • A Usability Guy’s Journey to Creating his First KDE Tool – Part 2: A Vision

    The nice thing is that we can reuse the information for AppStream to automatically create a website for each application which is at least a lot more informative for end users than what quickgit provides. Of course, those projects who have the manpower and motivation to create gorgeous websites like that for Minuet or Krita should still do that, but the others would still get at least something useful.

  • Kronometer 2.1 now available

    After many months since the last release, I’ve finally found the time to finalize the next stable release for kronometer. The main change is a redesign of the main window. The toolbar is now smaller and in top position, the statusbar is gone and the menubar is hidden by default. Usability of other dialogs has been improved as well.

  • Performance update for breeze icons

    As breeze is a monochrome icon set the contrast is one of the biggest issues. With Plasma 5.6, the developers solved this problem by applying the system color scheme to the icons. Now the icons use the same color (and contrast) as the text. With this shiny new feature, users can define the colors of the icon set by themselves.

  • Google Summer of Code, 2016

    Well, the wait for the results of Google Summer of Code 2016 is over. My proposal has been accepted and is a GSoC project now. I will be spending the summer writing code for KDE for implementing the project Minuet Mobile(KDE-edu).

  • KDE Neon User Edition 2254 Screenshot Tour
  • Some Qt Contributors Uneasy About The Growing Commercial Focus Of The Qt Company

    For the past week has been a somewhat active mailing list thread about the Qt Project being misrepresented on The Qt Company's qt.io web-site.

  • KDE e.V. Quarterly Report - 1st Half of 2015

    The KDE e.V. report for the first half of 2015 is now available. It presents a survey of all the activities and events carried out, supported, and funded by KDE e.V. in that period, as well as the reporting of major events, conferences and mentoring programs that KDE has been involved in.

  • KDE is not the right place for Thunderbird [Ed: This post, "KDE is not the right place for Thunderbird," has just been deleted. One wonder what happened. Maybe pressure from peers?]

    For years, Mozilla has been saying they are no longer focused on Thunderbird and its place is outside of Mozilla. Now it seems they are going to act on what they said: Mozilla seeks new home for e-mail client Thunderbird.

    The candidates they are exploring are the Software Freedom Conservancy, The Document Foundation, and I expect at least the Apache Software Foundation to be a serious candidate, and Gnome to propose.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • open365, let's declare war at Google and Microsoft

    Open365 is a public and/or private cloud designed to compete with the likes of Google Drive or Office365 by leveraging all the best free software out there.

    The service is designed to scale horizontally as well as to be resilient to components crashing or going crazy. In order to achieve this we have implemented a microservice architecure that communicate using a bus (rabbitmq) plus some other tricks so we can scale using commodity hardware horizontally. Nothing fancy, nothing revolutionary but it had to be done Smile

    Finally, we’ve integrated under the same system very well know software solutions for File sinchronization, PIM (Email, calendar,contacts…) and office.

    Specifically

    Seafile
    Kontact
    Libreoffice

    For the last two, we re using SPICE and our HTML5/Javascript client to run those applications in the server and send only the interface to the Web browser in a really efficient way.

  • clazy: Suppressing warnings
  • Summer Is Coming

    First, we managed to kill of projects.kde.org for good. It used to run ChiliProject - which has been discontinued and no longer provides security updates - and used to be a constant source of headaches for the syasadmins, with the seemingly endless HTTP 500 ISEs we'd generate. After it went down in the middle of CKI - and resulted in a few embarrassing moments in the middle of talks - we decided it had to go.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Reordering a Qt Quick ListView via drag'n'drop

    It is common in user interfaces to provide the user with a list of elements which can be reordered by dragging them around. Displaying a list of elements with Qt Quick is easy, thanks to the ListView component. Giving the user the ability to reorder them is less straightforward. This 3 article series presents one approach to implementing this.

  • A note to those who test kde apps building them from sources
  • Google Summer of Code,2016

    So, finally, the wait is over. The result of GSoC selections is out and Voila! my proposal has been accepted and is now a GSoC project. I would like to thank KDE community, my mentor, and co-mentors for their support and giving me an opportunity to be a part of this programme. I will be working on the project LabPlot (KDEdu) which is a KDE-application for interactive graphing and analysis of scientific data. LabPlot provides an easy way to create, manage and edit plots.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • A Usability Guy’s Journey to Creating his First KDE Tool – Part 1: Baby Steps

    These two may sound completely unrelated at first, but they both were key in sending me down this path. This article will tell the story behind 1, which is about my very first code commit to KDE. I will go into quite some detail because I feel that my journey may provide some insights for KDE.

    This story started on April 6th. I was discussing with Aleix Pol about actual vs. perceived performance in Plasma and other KDE software. One thing we agreed on was that animation speed has a big impact on perceived performance. During that discussion, we found out that the setting for the animation speed is almost impossible to find in System Settings, because it sits in a module where you would not expect it to be (Display and Monitor > Compositor), and searching for “animation speed” points you to the wrong module (this was due to an oversight when the “Desktop Effects” module was split in two and the search keywords were not adapted). The “it sits in an unexpected module” problem is about to be fixed by moving it into the “Workspace behavior” module, but first I wanted the actual bug with the search pointing to the wrong module to be fixed.

    At first, as usual, I wrote a bug report about it. Then, Aleix, being a cunning little Spaniard (*scnr*, I know you’re Catalonian), said these fateful words: “You could fix this one yourself!”. Now the cunning part was that he knew I could not defend myself by saying “But I don’t know C++ …” because the search keywords are defined in .desktop files, easily read- and writable for mere mortals like me. So, without any good argument why I couldn’t, I set out to fix it myself.

    The first obstacle on my journey was that even after years of being a KDE contributor, I still did not have a KDE developer account. The reason is simple: My contributions usually come in the form of text and mockups, not code. I describe my ideas in wiki pages, emails, forum posts, chats, review requests, bug reports, blog posts, …, but not in repositories. For this simple patch, I could have just put it up on Reviewboard or Phabricator and have someone else commit it, but if I was going to contribute code, I wanted to do it properly™.

  • It has happened!

    I have been selected for the Google Summer of Code!

    For the better part of the summer vacation, I will now be committing myself to write code for KDE to implement my project idea of implementing a virtual folder in Dolphin to make it easier to select files.

  • GSoC project accepted, now what?

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.80)

    I just made a release of KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.80), which is the first preview release of the upcoming bugfix release in the 0.6 series. Please note that the 0.6 series is still based on KDE 4.

  • KDiff3 for KDE Frameworks 5 becomes usable

    After recently starting to port KDiff3 to KDE Frameworks 5, I made a few commits today making the software actually usable.

  • Grantlee v5.1.0 (Codename Außen hart und innen ganz weich) now available

    The Grantlee community is pleased to announce the release of Grantlee version 5.1 (Mirror). Grantlee contains an implementation of the Django template system in Qt.

  • Minuet 0.1 released!

    I'm happy to announce that the very first release of Minuet is available today as part of KDE Applications 16.04 \o/.

  • News about kdepim: Allow to build standalone each applications
  • New Krita 3.0 Alpha/Development Windows Builds
  • Kdenlive: Café, release and development

    In a few days, we are going to celebrate the release of Kdenlive 16.04.0.
    If you are interested in the project, you are welcome to join us in the next Kdenlive café, a monthly IRC meeting for users and developers.

  • KDE Neon out now – An Interview with Jonathan Riddell

    Is KDE’s Neon a new Linux distribution? Is it a showcase? Is it a test bed? Neon (“tech preview”) User Edition launches today and we got Jonathan Riddell, Neon’s front runner, to explain what all the fuss is about.

  • kver’s definition of anarchy
  • Travis-CI builds of KDE projects on Archlinux chroot

    How many of you knew that KDE has a github mirror? The mirror is useful for github users/fans (who can for example star their favorite KDE projects), but can also be useful to KDE developers who don’t care about github. I was on of them, until today. Github features an excellent integration with Travis-CI. This means that you (as github user) get for free a Continuous Integration system already up and running, waiting for your commits.

  • KDE 5_16.04 for Slackware-current

    You may already have tried it through the PLASMA5 variant of the Slackware Live Edition which I uploaded yesterday, and here is the announcement of the addition of KDE 5_16.04 to my ‘ktown’ repository – the April release of the combined KDE Frameworks 5.21.0, Plasma 5.6.3 and Applications 16.04.0.

  • KDE-FreeBSD catching up

    After a long struggle with digiKam (mostly because of the libmediawiki plugin), a brief struggle with KDevelop (it is well-behaved), and a careful struggle with CMake (because lots of other ports depend on it), official ports have been updated (by Tobias Berner and Raphael Kubo da Costa) with the state-of-the-art for KDE4 from the unofficial area51 repository.

KDE Announces the Release of KDE Applications 16.04 for KDE Plasma 5 Desktop

Filed under
KDE

Today, April 20, 2016, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the final KDE Applications 16.04 software collection for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

Read more

KDE neon User Edition Tech Preview

Filed under
KDE

It’s a build of KDE neon using released software, our clever CI system watches download.kde.org for new releases such as Plasma 5.6.3 and packages them pronto. If you want to use the latest released software, this is the way to do it.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.6.3 Desktop Environment Released Patches a KWin Crash, Fixes Bugs

Filed under
KDE

Today, April 19, 2016, KDE announced the immediate availability of the third maintenance release in the stable KDE Plasma 5.6 series of the popular desktop environment used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems by default.

Read more

fresh breeze for Ubuntu

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

1,5 years ago the VDG start with an icon theme for LibreOffice to guaranty an consistent look and feel for Plasma users. Now this new icon theme Breeze was used by default in the KDE Linux distributions and on Mac OS X.

Breeze is a monochrome icon theme and fits well into modern Desktops like Plasma and OS X but the second reason is that the Breeze icon set is a complete icon set. We can support 100 % (and I mean 100 %) of the needed LibreOffice icons. In addition Breeze supports dark colour themes AND 32 px icon size. This is unique because only the default icon set is that much feature complete.

Read more

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • [Utilizing Vulkan Within Qt]
  • The last weekend on Earth

    In the last two months, tech developers, helped by students from India in order to the Google Summer of Code, worked hard, together with the editing team, on new features and fuctions that we wanted to implement in the site. So, tech developers decided to release WikiToLearn 0.7 on saturday April 09. But something went wrong, and what would have to be an ordinary saturday of releasing became a hellish saturday.

  • Audio Volume improvements in Plasma 5.7

    Plasma 5.4 introduced plasma-pa (new audio volume applet and KCM) to replace KMix, however it was missing few important features in the initial release. Unfortunately, there was no progress after that.

  • Vote Loony to Add K to the Welsh Language
  • Horde of Cuteness fundraiser
  • Cross-compiling Krita using MXE

    So, using MXE, I built Qt and most dependencies. Still missing are Vc, OpenColorIO, GSL, Poppler-qt5 and openjpeg. I also needed to remove some of the hacks we did to make Krita compile with MSVC: we had added a couple of dummy header files to provide things like nothl and friends (these days superseded by QtEndian). A 3rd-party library we embed, xcftools, had its own equivalent of that stuff. But apart from that...

  • Interview with Esfenodon

    I’m always searching for the way to use as much open source software as possible at University. Maybe it was as simple as searching google for it. Krita software, hmmm, interesting, let’s give it a try. Maybe the Krita name was familiar to me because some time ago I read about a collection of open source tools for audiovisual creativity.

  • How do you use Grantlee?

    It is also used in the Cutelyst web framework for generating html, templated emails and any other use-cases users of that framework have.

    There is also rather advanced Grantlee integration available in KDevelop for new class generation, using the same principles I blogged about some years ago.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux at 25: How Linux changed the world

I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily. I was no stranger to Unix, having spent plenty of time on commercial Unix systems like OSF/1, HP-UX, SunOS, and the newly christened Sun Solaris. But this was different. Read more

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

  • Coherent Accelerators, FPGAs, and PLD Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    It has been more than a decade since CPU core clock frequencies stopped doubling every 18 months, which has shifted the search for performance from the "hardware free lunch" to concurrency and, more recently, hardware accelerators. Beyond accelerating computational offload, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and programmable logic devices (PLDs) have long been used in the embedded space to provide ways to offload I/O or to implement timing-sensitive algorithms as close as possible to the pin.
  • Linux's brilliant career, in pictures
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.
  • Quarter Century of Innovation – aka Happy Birthday Linux!
    Happy birthday Linux. You’ve defined how we should be using and adoption technology. You’ve disrupted and continue to disrupt, industries all over the place. You’ve helped define what it means to share ideas openly and freely. You’ve shown what happens when we collaborate and work together. Free and Open Source is a win-win for all and Linux is the Gold Standard of that.
  • Microsoft Open Source Czar Takes Spotlight at LinuxCon [Ed: Microsoft paid for this]
  • Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week
    You'd be forgiven for thinking Microsoft is actively trying to stop people using Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. A patch this week broke one of the key features of the OS: PowerShell.

Android Leftovers

  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 unveiled in China, priced at $135
    Xiaomi took the wraps off their latest smartphone offering, the Redmi Note 4, earlier today, and as is expected from the budget-friendly Redmi series, the device offers a premium look, specifications, and features, and more importantly, an ultra-affordable price tag. The Redmi Note 4 retains the premium full metal unibody construction that was introduced with its predecessor, but now comes with a brushed metal finish and chamfered edges that looks and feels even better. The design language is quite similar as well, with the Redmi Note 4 also coming with a fingerprint scanner on the back. Under the hood, the Redmi Note 4 comes with a 5.5-inch Full HD display that is covered with a 2.5D curved glass panel. The phone is powered by a MediaTek Helio X20 processor, that is backed by the Mali-T880MP4 GPU and 2 GB or 3 GB of RAM. 16 GB or 64 GB are the on-board storage options available, which also dictates how much RAM you get, and you also get expandable storage via microSD card to cover all your needs. Keeping everything running is a huge 4,100 mAh battery.
  • New study finds iPhones fail far more often than Android phones
    Apple customers are generally a shockingly loyal bunch. The company’s high repeat customer rate can be attributed to a combination of factors that concern iPhones themselves as well as Apple’s industry-leading customer service. Dealing with Apple’s customer care department has always been a pleasure compared to dealing with rival companies, and iPhones themselves have historically been very reliable, offering a consistently smooth user experience that people love.
  • Relax, Spire can now connect to Android phones
    Spire, the wearable that promises to help you with healthy breathing and mindfulness, was previously only available for iOS devices. But that should change with an update rolling out now.
  • Android 7.0 Nougat: Small changes that make a big difference in UX
    The seventh iteration of Android (Nougat) has finally been released by the mighty Google. If you happen to be the owner of a Nexus device, you might see this update very soon. Everyone else...you know the drill. So after an extended period of waiting for the update to trickle through your carrier and onto your device, what can you expect to happen to your Android device once its center has become a creamier shade of Nougat?
  • Two Nokia Android smartphones show up in benchmark
    Nokia is definitely coming out with a few Android smartphones later this year, but today's Nokia has little in common with the company that ruled the mobile phone industry for years. For starters, the devices that will be released this year, or the next, will be made by a third-party company. Nokia won't be manufacturing phones anymore and most likely it won't manage the way they are sold through retailers and authorized resellers.
  • Proxima bae, Instagram scams, Android goes full crypto: ICYMI
  • PayPal adds proper Nexus Imprint fingerprint login support on Android
  • Google Duo has been downloaded 5 million times on Android since its release

Comparison of the Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 Tizen smartphones

Compare Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3 Tizen Smartphones Lets do a quick history lesson: The first Tizen Smartphone was the Samsung Z1, then came the Z3, and yesterday was the turn of the 4G touting Z2 to take centre stage. On the whole the Z2 is very similar to the Z1 and can be thought of a Z1 2016 edition with the inclusion of 4G cellular connectivity and updated software with user requested features. Read more