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KDE

KDE: Krita, Koko, Kate/KDevelop, GCompris, KStars, Qt and Sticklyst

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KDE
  • Krita 3.2.0 Best Alternative To Photoshop for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Krita is a KDE program for sketching and painting, although it has image processing capabilities, offering an end–to–end solution for creating digital painting files from scratch by masters. Fields of painting that Krita explicitly supports are concept art, creation of comics and textures for rendering. Modelled on existing real-world painting materials and workflows, Krita supports creative working by getting out of the way and with a snappy response.

  • Gsoc Final Week Report

    Koko is a simple image gallery application that is designed to view, edit and share the images.

  • Look what you have done^W^Wdo!

    You are using Kate or KDevelop and often editing directly the sources of Markdown files, Qt UI files, SVG files, Dot graph files and whatever else formats which are based on plain text files?

    And you are having to use a workflow to check the current state which is saving the file and (re)loading it in a separate viewer application?

  • GCompris- Digital Electricity Tutorial levels
  • Hundreds of visual surveys in KStars!

    With the KStars "Hipster" 2.8.1 release, I introduced Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS) in KStars with three sample catalogs in the optical, infrared, and gamma regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  • A new QProcess::startDetached
  • Announcing Sticklyst – leveraging KDE Frameworks on the Web

    Sticklyst is a web paste tool, like pastebin, Stick Notes (paste.kde.org), build with Cutelyst and KDE Frameworks.

    Building this kind of tool has been on my TODO list for a long time, but never really put some effort into it. When the idea first came by, I decided to look at the code of http://paste.scsys.co.uk/ which is powered by a Perl Catalyst application, to my surprise the Perl module that handled syntax highlighting was a port of the code of Kate, and it even said it used Kate’s definitions.

Krita 3.2.1, Updates Vision and More

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KDE
Software

KDE and the Menu Crisis

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KDE

The menu crisis has been slow in coming — so slowly that few people are aware of it. Bit by bit, they have become accustomed to the inconvenience and distraction of the menu on the computer desktop, and learned to endure it. Yet the fact that KDE’s Plasma 5 desktop offers three choices of menu layouts, as well as a couple of alternatives to alleviate the difficulties shows just how little consensus exists about the most usable menu design.

The crisis exists because the menu was designed when thirty megabyte hard drives were the norm, yet we continue to use it. The purpose of a menu is to launch an application, preferably as quickly as possible, so a user’s work flow is uninterrupted. When personal computers were first introduced, menus easily filled this purpose. Few applications were available, and menus rarely had to be more than a couple of levels deep, so applications could easily be found.

However, as hard drives became larger, users had to scan more and more applications to find the one they wanted. The most extreme case was the Debian menu, which in places was six or seven levels deep. All sorts of partial solutions were tried –for example, not listing all the applications, a search field, and favorite list — but the problem has steadily increased with the size of drives. Probably the only reason why all the stopgap designs and solutions for menus are tolerated at all is that their uses on phones and tablets means that they have conditioned all of us to endure the awkwardness as the norm. Most users simply assume that nothing can be done, and continue using menus the same as always — ironically, often at the same time as moving away from desktop launchers, which can have the same problems, but can at least take provide another solution to help keep menus functioning.

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QupZilla Renamed KDE Falkon, Developer David Rosca interviewed

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KDE
Interviews
Web
  • QupZilla Web Browser Becomes KDE Falkon

    The QupZilla open-source web-browser built using Qt WebEngine and in development for the past seven years is now part of the KDE project and has renamed itself to Falkon.

    Earlier this month the QupZilla developers announced they would be moving under the KDE umbrella and in the process rename itself. Today they made it known their new name for this KDE web-browser is Falkon.

  • The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews David Rosca of QupZilla

    QupZilla, currently at version 2.1.2, is a free software Web browser using the new and very fast QtWebEngine browser. It aims to be a lightweight Web browser available through all major platforms. This project was originally started only for educational purposes by a lone developer, David Rosca, and since then, QupZilla has grown into a feature-rich browser. QupZilla has all of the standard functions you expect from a Web browser. It includes bookmarks, history (including a sidebar view), and tabs. Above that, it has ad-blocking enabled by default with a built-in plugin. Over time, this one-man project has grown to include numerous contributors.

Plasma 5.10.5 and Frameworks 5.37 updates now in backports PPA for Zesty 17.04

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KDE

The final 5.10.5 bugfix update of the Plasma 5.10 series is now available for users of Kubuntu Zesty Zapus 17.04 to install via our backports PPA.

KDE Frameworks is also updated to the latest version 5.37

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KDE/Qt: Go Support in KDevelop, ImageViewer, Evolving KDE, Building Qt on Debian, SDDM on FreeBSD

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KDE
  • Go support in KDevelop. GSoC week 12. Polishing features.
  • Focus on the ImageViewer
  • Evolving KDE – Let’s set some goals

    Since 2015 I and other people have been talking about Evolving KDE – meaning reflecting on where we are, where we want to go and how we will get there. We have made great strides with defining our vision and mission since then. It has not been an easy exercise but a necessary one because it gives us focus and clarity about our purpose.

  • Building Qt on Debian

    Once the build is done (this takes a lot of time, expect at least 45 minutes with a decent machine), you need to install Qt. Run make install to do so. As you install Qt to someplace in your home directory, you do not need to use sudo.

  • SDDM on FreeBSD

    At some point, the KDE4-era KDM is going to end up unmaintained. The preferred display or login manager for KDE Plasma 5 is SDDM, which is Qt-based, and QML-themeable. In Area51, the unofficial KDE-on-FreeBSD ports repository, we’ve been working on Plasma 5 and modern KDE Applications for quite some time. One of the parts of that is, naturally, SDDM.

    There’s x11/sddm in the plasma5/ branch right now, with a half-dozen code patches which I’ll have to look in to for upstreaming. I decided to try building it against current official ports — that is, current Qt5 on FreeBSD — and using it to log in to my daily FreeBSD workstation. One that runs KDE4. That is immediately a good test, I think, of support for not-the-obvious-X11-environment for SDDM.

KDE: QtWebEngine on FreeBSD, KDE PIM, Akademy 2017, Craft, Accessibility, Comics Manager for Krita, Progress on Kube

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KDE
  • QtWebEngine on FreeBSD

    Tobias and Raphael pushed the button today to push QtWebEngine into FreeBSD ports. This has been a monumental effort, because the codebase is just .. ugh. Not meant for third-party consumption, let’s say. There are 76 patches needed to get it to compile at all. Lots of annoying changes to make, like explaining that pkg-config is not a Linux-only technology. Nor is NSS, or Mesa, while #include
    is, in fact, Linux-only. Lots of patches can be shared with the Chromium browser, but it’s a terrible time-sink nonetheless.

  •  

  • KDE PIM in Randa 2017

    Randa Meetings is an annual meeting of KDE developers in a small village in Swiss Alps. The Randa Meetings is the most productive event I ever attended (since there’s nothing much else to do but hack from morning until night and eat Mario’s chocolate Smile) and it’s very focused – this year main topic is making KDE more accessible.

    Several KDE PIM developers will be present as well – and while we will certainly want to hear other’s input regarding accessibility of Kontact, our main goal in Randa will be to port away from KDateTime (the KDE4 way of handling date and time in software) to QDateTime (the Qt way of handling date and time). This does not sound very interesting, but it’s a very important step for us, as afterward, we will finally be free of all legacy KDE4 code. It is no simple task, but we are confident we can finish the port during the hackfest. If everything goes smoothly, we might even have time for some more cool improvements and fixes in Kontact Wink

  • Services Collaborating Openly at Akademy 2017

    At the recently concluded Akademy 2017 in the incredibly hot but lovely Almería, yours truly went and did something a little silly: Submitted both a talk (which got accepted) and hosted a BoF, both about Open Collaboration Services, and the software stack which KDE builds to support that API in the software we produce. The whole thing was amazing. A great deal of work, very tiring, but all 'round amazing. I even managed to find time to hack a little bit on Calligra Gemini, which was really nice.

    This blog entry collects the results from the presentation and the BoF. I realise this is quite long, but i hope that you stick with it. In the BoF rundown, i have highlighted the specific results, so hopefully you'll be able to skim-and-detail-read your specific interest areas Wink

  • Akademy 2017 - A wonderful experience

    Akademy 2017 was such a great experience, that I would love to share with you all in this post.

  • Akademy 2017 - Recap

    Last month I had opportunity to visit the Almería, Spain for Akademy 2017. Akademy 2017 is KDE’s annual world summit. Akademy makes it possible to meet the felow KDE contributors, some of whom you only know with their IRC nicknames (Yes, I am not old enough to know every contributors yet Tongue). Here is few things I did at the Akademy 2017.

  • My Adventures on Crafting part III – Craft Atelier

    Once upon a time, I start o use Craft, an amazing tool inside KDE that does almost all the hard work to compile KDE Applications on Windows and MacOS.

    Thanks to the great work of Hannah since last year Randa Meetings, Craft is becoming a great tool. Using all the power of Python, I started to be able to work on the deploy of AtCore for Windows.

  • Why YOU care about accessibility, and can help!

    Accessibility (a11y for short) seems like a niche area of concern for many people. I was thinking about this recently on a hot morning in Spain, walking to the bus station with my wheeled luggage. The sidewalks are thoughtfully cut out for wheelchairs -- and those with luggage! and the kids riding skateboards, and...... the rest of us.

  • Writing a comics manager for Krita

    Those who know me, or at the least know my history with Krita is that one of the prime things I personally want to use Krita for is making comics. So back in the day one of the things I did was make a big forum post discussing the different parts of making a comic and how different software solves it.

    One of the things about making a comic is that is a project. Meaning, it is big and unwieldy, with multiple files and multiple disciplines. You need to be able to write, to draw, to ink, to color. And you need to be able to do this consistently.

  • Progress on Kube

    We’ve been mostly focusing on ironing out UX problems all over the place. It turns out, when writing desktop applications using QtQuick you’ll be ending up with a lot of details to figure out for yourself.

KDE: KStars, KWin, Go support in KDevelop, Qt News, Plasma Mobile, Shelf and More Akademy

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KDE
  • KStars 2.8.1 "Hipster" Release is out!

    The highlight for this release is experimental support for HiPS: Hierarchical Progressive Surveys. HiPS provides multi-resolution progressive surveys to be overlayed directly in client applications, such as KStars. It provides an immersive experience as you can explore the night sky dynamically.

    With over 200+ surveys across the whole electromagnetic spectrum from radio, infrared, visual, to even gamma rays, the user can pan and zoom progressively deeper into the data visually.

  • Distribution management – how Upstream ensures Downstream keeps the Quality

    I read Emmanuele Bassi’s very interesting blog post about software distribution this week and thought a lot about it. Emmanuele kind of answers to a presentation by Richard Brown (from OpenSUSE fame). While I haven’t seen that presentation, I saw a similar one last year at the openSUSE conference and also talked with Richard about the topic. So I dare to think that I understand Richard’s arguments and even agree with most of them.

    Nevertheless I want to share some of my thoughts on the topic from the perspective of KWin maintainership. KWin is more part of the OS stack, so distributing through means like Flatpack are not a valid option IMHO. As KWin is close to the OS, we have a very well integration with distributions. Plasma (which KWin is part of) has dedicated packager groups in most distributions, we have a direct communication channel to the distros, we know our packagers in large parts in person, etc. etc. So from the open source distribution model we are in the best category. We are better positioned than let’s say a new game which needs to be distributed.

  • Go support in KDevelop. GSoC week 11. Code completion and bug fixing.
  • Introducing QtMqtt
  • 2017 for Qt Contributors

    This is a good year to be a Qt contributor.

    There was Qt Day Italy in June. From what I hear, the event was a success. The talks were great and everything worked. This was the sixth Qt Day Italy, so there is tradition behind this event!

    Even though it is not a Qt event, KDE Akademy is worth mentioning. Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community. This year Akademy was in Almeria Spain, in late July, 22nd to 27th. KDE has over the years brought many excellent developers to Qt, and they are definitely the biggest open source project using Qt.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Officially Out, More Apps Were Ported to KDE Frameworks 5

    The KDE Project is pleased to announce the release and general availability of the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite primarily designed for KDE Plasma 5 desktop environments, but also compatible with other desktops and window managers.

    KDE Applications 17.08 has been in development since mid-July 2017, and it received both a Beta and an RC build that users could test on their GNU/Linux distros if they had access to these pre-release packages. But the final release is now officially out and it's coming soon to the repos of your favorite operating system.

    "We have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier. Enjoy your new apps," reads the release announcement.

  • Modest Wallpaper Tweaks
  • Sixth Blog Gsoc 2017

    Hi, this post is general information about telemetry in Krita. I want to clarify some points.

    Soon we will launch a preliminary testing of my branch. In case of successful testing, it will go into one of the closest releases of Krita (not 3.2). Krita must follow the policy of the KDE on information gathering. What information do we want to collect?

  • Plasma Mobile - Journey Towards Open Mobile Platform (slides from Akademy 2017)
  • Documents Shelf [KAMD, KAStats]

    Once upon a time, for those who remember the old days of Plasma and Lancelot, there was an experimental applet called Shelf.

    The idea behind the Shelf was that sometimes it is useful to have a small applet that just shows your recent files, favourite applications, devices, which you can place on your panel or desktop for quick access.

    Now, this post is not about a revival of Lancelot and Shelf (sadly), but it is closely related to them.

    Namely, I always disliked the “recent documents” section that is available in almost all launchers in Plasma. The reason is that only one in ten of those documents has a chance to ever be opened again.

  • Running applications and unittests without "make install"

    In our Akademy presentation, Kévin and I showed the importance for a better developer story to be able to work on a KDE module without having to install it. Running unittests and running applications without installing the module at all is possible, it turns out, it just needs a bit of effort to set things up correctly.

Plasma 5.11 Wallpaper

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KDE

Well, it’s that time of the year again where I talk about wallpapers!

For those who watched the livestream of the beach wallpaper, you’ll notice this isn’t what I had been working on. Truth be told after the stream I hit a few artistic blocks which brought progress to a grinding halt. I plan to finish that wallpaper, but for this release I created something entirely different while I decide what to do with it. I enjoyed this “wireframe” effect, and will probably experiment with it again.

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KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.08.0

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KDE
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.08.0

    August 17, 2017. KDE Applications 17.08 is here. We have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier. Enjoy your new apps!

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Released, More Apps Ported To KF5

    Out today is the latest four-month update to the KDE Applications collection of desktop packages.

    With KDE Applications 17.08 being the last cycle where kdelibs4-based packages are allowed before being dropped if not ported to KDE Frameworks 5, there was more porting this cycle in transitioning these packages to using the modern KDE libraries.

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More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Tech Helps Feds Solve Workforce Turnover Issues
    Just as a mainframe from decades ago might be ready for retirement, the IT staff who originally procured and installed that system might also be preparing for a new phase in their lives. It’s up to the current and next generation of government IT employees to prepare for that eventuality, but there are indications they may not be ready, despite evidence that older IT professionals are retiring or will soon be leaving their positions. Unfortunately, a skills gap exists even among younger generation IT workers. Agencies are scrambling to find personnel with expertise in cloud service management, cybersecurity, technical architecture and legacy technologies, such as common business-oriented language (COBOL) and mainframes, among other areas. At the same time that many workers are getting ready to retire, leaving behind a wealth of knowledge, many younger IT professionals are struggling to gain the knowledge they will need to take their agencies into the future.
  • Introducing Fn: “Serverless must be open, community-driven, and cloud-neutral”
    Fn, a new serverless open source project was announced at this year’s JavaOne. There’s no risk of cloud lock-in and you can write functions in your favorite programming language. “You can make anything, including existing libraries, into a function by packaging it in a Docker container.” We invited Bob Quillin, VP for the Oracle Container Group to talk about Fn, its best features, next milestones and more.
  • Debian seminar in Yokohama, 2017/11/18
    I had attended to Tokyo area debian seminar #157. The day’s special guest is Chris Lamb, the Debian Project Leader in 2017. He had attended to Open Compliance Summit, so we invited him as our guest.
  • Overclock Labs bets on Kubernetes to help companies automate their cloud infrastructure
    Overclock Labs wants to make it easier for developers to deploy and manage their applications across clouds. To do so, the company is building tools to automate distributed cloud infrastructure and, unsurprisingly, it is betting on containers — and specifically the Kubernetes container orchestration tools — to do this. Today, Overclock Labs, which was founded two years ago, is coming out of stealth and announcing that it raised a $1.3 million seed round from a number of Silicon Valley angel investors and CrunchFund — the fund that shares a bit of its name and history with TechCrunch but is otherwise completely unaffiliated with the blog you are currently reading.
  • MariaDB Energizes the Data Warehouse with Open Source Analytics Solution
    MariaDB® Corporation, the company behind the fastest growing open source database, today announced new product enhancements to MariaDB AX, delivering a modern approach to data warehousing that enables customers to easily perform fast and scalable analytics with better price performance over proprietary solutions. MariaDB AX expands the highly successful MariaDB Server, creating a solution that enables high performance analytics with distributed storage and parallel processing, and that scales with existing commodity hardware on premises or across any cloud platform. With MariaDB AX, data across every facet of the business is transformed into meaningful and actionable results.
  • AT&T Wants White Box Routers with an Open Operating System [Ed: AT&T wants to openwash its surveillance equipment]
    AT&T says it’s not enough to deploy white box hardware and to orchestrate its networks with the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) software. “Each individual machine also needs its own operating system,” writes Chris Rice, senior vice president of AT&T Labs, Domain 2.0 Architecture, in a blog post. To that end, AT&T announced its newest effort — the Open Architecture for a Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS).
  • Intel Lands Support For Vector Neural Network Instructions In LLVM
  • p2k17 Hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on ports+packages progress
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Over
    Feature development on the GCC 8 compiler is over with it now entering stage three of its development process. SUSE's Richard Biener announced minutes ago that GCC 8 entered stage three development, meaning only general bug fixing and documentation updates are permitted.
  • 2018 Is The Year For Open Source Software For The Pentagon
  • Open-source defenders turn on each other in 'bizarre' trademark fight sparked by GPL fall out
    Two organizations founded to help and support developers of free and open-source software have locked horns in public, betraying a long-running quarrel rumbling mostly behind the scenes. On one side, the Software Freedom Law Center, which today seeks to resolve licensing disputes amicably. On the other, the Software Freedom Conservancy, which takes a relatively harder line against the noncompliance of licensing terms. The battleground: the, er, US Patent and Trademark Office. The law center has demanded the cancellation of a trademark held by the conservancy.
  • Open Source Underwater Glider: An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner
    Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware.

Programming Leftovers

Security: Linux, Free Software Principles, Microsoft and Intel

  • Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has offered some very choice words about different approaches security, during a discussion about whitelisting features proposed for version 4.15 of the Linux kernel. Torvalds' ire was directed at open software aficionado and member of Google's Pixel security team Kees Cook, who he has previously accused of idiocy. Cook earned this round of shoutiness after he posted a request to “Please pull these hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1.”
  • Free Software Principles
    Ten thousand dollars is more than $3,000, so the motives don't add up for me. Hutchins may or may not have written some code, and that code may or may not have been used to commit a crime. Tech-literate people, such as the readers of Linux Magazine, understand the difference between creating a work and using it to commit a crime, but most of the media coverage – in the UK, at least – has been desperate to follow the paradigm of building a man up only to gleefully knock him down. Even his achievement of stopping WannaCry is decried as "accidental," a word full of self-deprecating charm when used by Hutchins, but which simply sounds malicious in the hands of the Daily Mail and The Telegraph.
  • New warning over back door in Linux
    Researchers working at Russian cyber security firm Dr Web claim to have found a new vulnerability that enables remote attackers to crack Linux installations virtually unnoticed. According to the anti-malware company, cyber criminals are getting into the popular open-source operating system via a new backdoor. This, they say, is "indirect evidence" that cyber criminals are showing an increasing interest in targeting Linux and the applications it powers. The trojan, which it's calling Linux.BackDoor.Hook.1, targets the library libz primarily. It offers compression and extraction capabilities for a plethora of Linux-based programmes.
  • IN CHATLOGS, CELEBRATED HACKER AND ACTIVIST CONFESSES COUNTLESS SEXUAL ASSAULTS
  • Bipartisan Harvard panel recommends hacking [sic] safeguards for elections
     

    The guidelines are intended to reduce risks in low-budget local races as well as the high-stakes Congressional midterm contests next year. Though most of the suggestions cost little or nothing to implement and will strike security professionals as common sense, notorious attacks including the leak of the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta, have succeeded because basic security practices were not followed.  

  • Intel Chip Flaws Leave Millions of Devices Exposed
     

    On Monday, the chipmaker released a security advisory that lists new vulnerabilities in ME, as well as bugs in the remote server management tool Server Platform Services, and Intel’s hardware authentication tool Trusted Execution Engine. Intel found the vulnerabilities after conducting a security audit spurred by recent research. It has also published a Detection Tool so Windows and Linux administrators can check their systems to see if they're exposed.