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KDE: Plasma Mobile/postmarketOS, Kubuntu 17.10, and 2017 With KDE

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KDE
  • postmarketOS Update: Now Runs Plasma Mobile/Lune UI/Xfce On Real Devices

    In the last week of December, I came across a post on Reddit/r/KDE that showed a postmarketOS device with Plasma Mobile. Just recently, the team had published the latest blog update on their website, listing out the recent developments and breakthroughs achieved during the last months.

    Before going ahead and reading the developments, I’ll advise you to read this introductory post on postmarketOS if you’re not aware of the project.

  • Kubuntu 17.10[fix]: Fonts Looks Too Big After Enabling Nvidia’s Proprietary Driver?

    These days my main operating system is Kubuntu 17.10 because I’ve switched to KDE as my desktop environment. However, since my Asus laptop comes with a hybrid GPU setup, I decided to enable the more capable Nvidia GPU by installing its proprietary driver. Once I enabled it on Kubuntu 17.10, then after rebooting, I noticed that the fonts looks slightly (unnecessarily) bigger on the desktop and on the application windows. Luckily I was able to fix it quite easily. So if you’re having the same issue, this post will help you out for fixing it.

    To be honest, I rarely use the Nvidia GPU. And the only reason why I installed and enabled the proprietary driver was to see if it would break the user auto-login feature. This was purely out of my curiosity because that’s what happened in GNOME, while I reviewed Ubuntu 17.10.

  • A roadtrip through 2017 with KDE

    Happy New Year to all! The year 2017 has been a rollercoaster, to be honest. Well, it was rich and prosperous year regarding in technical terms. It was a beautiful year of great learning, splendid travel and got to network with some fantastic folks all around the globe.

    The best reason for making this 2017 incredible for me is KDE. One of the exciting community I have ever seen! It all started at the end of 2016, I got intrigued by the Tagline of KDE, “Experience freedom”. I started contributing to various projects inside KDE. My initial start was with Konsole, system settings, KIO and various educational suite programs. Moving on, I came across a student program organized by KDE named KDE-SoK and I was selected for it, yay!!!

    The project was with KStars(KDE’s amateur astronomy software which provides real-time and an accurate graphical simulation of the night sky, from any location on Earth.) to collect a new set of images from NASA/ESO catalogs along with orientation and pixel scale (arcsecs/pixel) from the whole set of Messier Catalog (which is a collection of 110 astronomy objects in the night sky). Images were processed for overlay in KStars using OpenCV, so to have transparency and to modulate according to the software.

KDE: KDE Applications 17.12, BSD, and Tracking KDE Development

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KDE
  • Closing on 2017

    Meanwhile, KDE has just released their KDE Applications 17.12 that gets rid of KDE 4 completely. Eric Hameleers has been working on that and he has posted on his blog about his work. A new LiveSlack ISO is also available as well with all those changes. He is currently working on testing wayland on top of Slackware-Current and i think he has nailed it with his progress in November. More tweaks are still needed to makes every applications are working well, but overall it's working already.

  • Retrospectacle

    At the beginning of 2017, I was a programmer (mostly Python, and a little bit of C++) and spent most of my day at my desk, with an IDE open and a cup of coffee at hand. At the end of 2017, I’m a programmer (mostly C++, and a little bit of Python) and spend most of my day at my desk, with an IDE open and a cup of espresso at hand.

    At some level of abstraction, not much has changed this year.

  • Tracking KDE Development

    A central place to track KDE development is the kde-commits@kde.org mailing list. To this mailing list, all code changes are sent, containing the log message as well as the diff that quickly shows what really changed. In the early days of KDE development, the changes were maintained by the CVS version control system. Later, this was changed to subversion. Nowadays, KDE mostly uses git, but some svn modules are still around.

    Since KDE is developed by many contributors, the kde-commits@kde.org mailing list obviously has high traffic, ranging from ~100 mails up to 400 mails a day (see marc.info for statistics).

Cutelyst 1.12.0 released

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Development
KDE

The year is about to end and so is Cutelyst v1 series, I wasn’t planning for another release this year but Matthias added some nice new features that I decided to roll 1.12 in 2017 branching 1.x.x series and master is now officially Cutelyst 2 with no stable API/ABI until 2.0.0 is tagged.

HTTP/2 support will hopefully be part of Cutelyst 2.0.0, there aren’t any drastic changes in v2, most important thing is fixing MSVC builds and removing deprecated API.

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KDE: Krita's 2017 Look Back, KDE-FreeBSD, KMarkdownWebView

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KDE
  • Looking back, looking forward

    First and foremost, 2017 ends well. We will end this year putting Krita 4.0 in string freeze, which means a release early next year! In 2017, we’ve released several versions of Krita 3.x. We’ve gained a lot of new contributors with great contributions to Krita. We’ve got money in the bank, too. Less than last year, but sales on the Windows Store help quite a bit! And development fund subscriptions have been steadily climbing, and we’re at 70 subscribers now! We’ve also done a great project with Intel, which not only brought some more money in, but also great performance improvements for painting and rendering animations.

    It’s been a tough year, though! Our maintainer had only just recovered from being burned out from working full-time on Krita and on a day job when the tax office called… The result was half a year of stress and negotiations, ending in a huge tax bill and a huge accountant’s bill. And enough uncertainty that we couldn’t have our yearly fund raiser, and enough extra non-coding work that the work on the features funded in 2016 took much, much more time than planned. In the period when we were talking to the tax office, until we could go public, Boudewijn and Dmitry were supported by members from the community; without that support the project might not have survived.

  • CMake 3.10 on FreeBSD

    The CMake port on FreeBSD is in the hands of the KDE-FreeBSD folks (since KDE was an early adopter), and generally it falls to me to do the CMake update while Tobias is still wrestling with Plasma and Raphael massages Qt 5.9 into our way of building. 3.10 was released five weeks ago, and it took a while to update the port.

    It doesn’t take long because of CMake — they’re great, the code builds flawlessly, and there has been a real effort on the part of the KitWare folks recently to absorb our downstream patches so that we have less work in future (During the delay packaging CMake 3.10.0 Kitware even put out 3.10.1, which re-started some processes). It doesn’t take long because of new FreeBSD-specific features in CMake — you can now use CPack to create native FreeBSD packages, just in case you don’t want to go through the ports system or poudriere.

  • KMarkdownWebView 0.4.0

    The KMarkdownWebView KParts plugin is also prepared for improved experience with the KTextEditor Document Preview plugin for KTextEditor-based applications like the editor Kate and IDE KDevelop.

  • KDE in 2017

    It’s time for the end of 2017 KDE fundraiser, and so this is good a time as any during the year to take a step back and publish a retrospective on the work we’ve individually done in 2017.

The KDE Community in 2017

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KDE
  • The KDE Community in 2017

    It's the time of year for recaps. We already talked about the advancements in KDE's software, and it makes sense we talk about that first. To many people and for many years, "KDE" was synonymous with a desktop environment and its applications. That is, KDE was its software.

    However, these days “KDE” stands for the community and the work we carry out – and that is more than just code. KDE sponsors students and budding developers, meets in events and works in sprints. All of this ultimately, yes, helps KDE produce more and better software. But more importantly, it encourages a large number of people to work together for the common good.

  • The power we have as bystanders

    Supporting free software is one of the things I do. Right now is a great time to help support KDE.

  • KDE Got a New Compass

    At the end of 2012, I started a series of post explaining the genesis of the KDE Manifesto. In that series, I pointed out that it took our community six years to go from the pains generated by our growth to creating the needed tool to solve them: namely the KDE Manifesto.

    It took us an awfully long time... but it looks like we're getting better at dealing with this kind of community changes. Indeed, this time it took us only three years between Akademy 2014 where Paul Adams delivered his wake up call about our loss in cohesion and Akademy 2017 where a group of old timers (including yours truly) proposed a way to federate our community behind common goal again. It's too bad Paul decided to retire before he could witness that change!

KDE and GNOME: KDE 2.*, Krita and GNOME.Asia

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KDE
GNOME
  • You Can Experiment With KDE 2.2.2 & Qt2 This Christmas

    If you find yourself with some extra time this holiday season and want to dive into a classic codebase on your modern Linux desktop, KDE developer Helio Castro has been working on his porting skills by porting KDE 2.2.2 and Qt2 to work on modern Linux systems.

    KDE 2 was released in 2000 with the use of the DCOP communication protocol, the still-living KIO I/O library, KHTML that at the time brought HTML 4.0 rendering, and Konqueror came as the default web-browser.

    So far he's got kdelibs 2.2.2 working -- tests are passing, graphics are working, and overall a bit beyond a "proof of concept" stage. As part of this "KDE 2 Restoration Project" he's trying to maintain the original code as much as possible but along the way also replacing the Autotools build system with CMake.

  • Interview with Rositsa Zaharieva

    My name is Rositsa (also known as Roz) and I’m somewhat of a late blooming artist. When I was a kid I was constantly drawing and even wanted to become an artist. Later on I chose a slightly different path for my education and career and as a result I now have decent experience as a web and graphic designer, front end developer and copywriter. I am now completely sure that I want to devote myself entirely to art and that’s what I’m working towards.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2017

    Thanks professors from university give us very good panel discussion, thanks Emily Chen to host this great panel discussion.  
    It’s import to get support in university when we want to promote open source and freeware all the time.

KDE: kdelibs 2, Fundraising, and Martin Gräßlin's Ten Years of KDE

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KDE
  • And then kdelibs 2 is ready for base consumption…

    So again in the time for xmas, i basically done the base kdelibs 2.2.2 port. Is far from be perfect as stated on my README.md, but can be perfected now due start to porting kdebase.

    If someone asked why i’m doing some ( alleged ) useless work, is because i’m really want to restore KDE 2 as well and improve my porting skills, since i think is a valuable skill for any programmer.

  • 10 days to go – KDE End of Year Fundraising

    Today I’m here to talk with you about the KDE End of Year Fundraising.

    I’m part of KDE community since the end of 2015. And my file it’s a LOT better because of it.

    I was able to grow a lot as a developer and as a person.

  • Martin Gräßlin's Ten years of KDE

    At the end of the year 2007 I sent my first patch to KWin. At that time 4.0 was about to be released, so that patch didn’t end up in the repo in 2007, but only in beginning of 2008 and was released with 4.1.

Best KDE/Plasma distro of 2017

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KDE

And the winner is …

Well, it’s kind of obvious. Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus is the uncontested king of this contest. It just did everything superbly – from the live session to prolonged, heavy use on several machines, it maintained and still maintains quality, elegance, flair and stability that no other Plasma rival – or for that matter, any rival – can offer. There are still some issues, like the Samba timestamp or screenshot shadows, and a handful of other papercuts, but the benefits outweigh these nuisances.

Kubuntu 17.04 is most likely the best KDE/Plasma release ever made, and it is a culmination of years of hard work. But then, It also sets a dangerous precedent, because once you have perfection, it is very hard to retain it, and consequently, the backlash is going to be ever more severe. As other tests show, including the Kubuntu family itself, it takes only a few short months to undo the stellar record with nothing more than some regressions and overstretched development resources.

But let’s stay in the happy zone. Kubuntu 17.04 is the perfect distro and the perfect Plasma desktop, and it’s the ultimate demonstrator of what this desktop environment can do, with a range of splendid features, great quality, deep forethought, excellent consistency, excellent ergonomics, and of course, all the fun stuff that people need. There’s little else that needs to be sad except lament the fact it’s not an LTS but just an interim release.

Conclusion

It is fun reading your own articles, and seeing how things change. And they did change. I believe that Plasma has progressed heavily since last year. Gnome went down, and Plasma went up. The cycle of Tux. I was rather cautious about Plasma, and it is still a volatile desktop environment. Good results are a gamble, but I believe that’s an outcome of shoddy QA and insufficient attention to details and less an integral failing of the Plasma desktop. As a whole, Plasma is a lot better than it was. But then, it’s also more difficult to put together than before. You either get amazing or horrible. There’s no middle ground. To be honest, I prefer that to gray mediocrity.

While Kubuntu 17.04 is the unrivaled star of the year, Mageia 6 also deserves a lot of praise. Like Antergos in the Gnome space, we have an underdog quietly slipping under the radar and delivering a bombshell. Quality, originality – such a rare trait nowadays – cunning, great ergonomics and then some. Side by side, these two show that Plasma is an excellent choice for the desktop. 2017, I am far more optimistic about Plasma even as my passion for other options is fading fast. You still need to be cautious and risk it, but the reward is so much higher than last year. Plasma is on a good trajectory, and hopefully it will continue into the next year. Meanwhile, you have some awesome distros to test and play with and sample the best of Plasma.

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KStars 2.8.9 is released!

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KDE

Here comes the last KStars release for 2017! KStars v2.8.9 is available now for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.

Robert Lancaster worked on improving PHD2 support with Ekos. This includes retrieving the guide star image, drift errors and RMS values, among other minor improvements and refactoring of the Ekos PHD2 codebase to support future extensions.

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KDE Applications 17.12.0

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KDE
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0
  • KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5

    KDE Applications 17.12 is now available as the newest six-month update to this collection of KDE programs making use of KDE Frameworks 5.

    KDE Applications 17.12 was the cut-off point by which only KF5-programs are permitted while those still making use of KDE4 libraries were forced to be dropped. That cleansing took place and Juk, KImageMapEditor, KMix, KGet, Kolf, Sweeper, and others were among those that saw KF5 ports while some older programs were dropped from the collection -- at least until seeing any KF5 port in the future.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE: Reasons to Get Excited, Plasma Weather, Plasma on ARM and Qt on Mobile

  • Reasons to Get Excited about KDE in 2018
  • Three old Plasma Weather applet TODO items gone for Plasma 5.12
    Just when I thought to have missed yet another Plasma feature freeze deadline with the one for Plasma 5.12 LTS and thus a good(?) excuse to re-decrease priority of some planned work on the Plasma Addons Weather applet (from the kdeplasma-addons repo, not to be mixed up with clearmartin’s one from github/store.kde.org) once more and thus delay things even further to a day that may never come, the Plasma team found they need to shift the deadline by some weeks to be after the KDE Frameworks 5.42.0 release. So excuse gone, no other quickly found… time to do a git pull and open the editor.
  • Plasma on ARM: State of the Union
    For the past year at Blue Systems my colleagues and I have been working on getting Plasma 5 ready for ARMv8 systems such as the Pinebook. If you were at QtCon this year, you might have also seen our awesome team demo’ing these systems at the KDE booth along with Plasma on ARMv7 systems such as the ODROID C1.
  • Sharing Files on Android or iOS from or with your Qt App – Part 2

Today in Techrights

SUSE: GCC and GSoC in OpenSUSE/SLES

  • SLES 12 Toolchain Update Brings new Developer Tools
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Updates Its Developer Toolchain to GCC 7
    SUSE's Andreas Jaeger writes in a blog post about the updated toolchain of the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 operating system and the new developer tools it brings. The article notes the fact that with the release of GNU Compiler Collection 7, the GCC team brought numerous improvements for developers, including better diagnostics, DWARF 5 support, as well as support for the C++ 17 standard. GCC 7 also contains improved optimization passes and takes advantage of some of the features of modern processors, and now it is available to all SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 customers with an active subscription.
  • Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE
    The application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

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