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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE's Simon Speech Recognition Gets Updated

    As reported last month, KDE's speech recognition software is being revived and released today is a new development release.

  • Simon 0.4.80 alpha released

    The first version (0.4.80) towards Simon 0.5.0 is out in the wilds. Please download the source code, test it and send us feedback.

  • So, Aparently, I moved.

    I’v been living here for the past six months, and I wanted to write earlier, but you guys know how things are, things like that can simply be in your head for quite a while before you actually do something. So, if anyone from the KDE community would like to get together for something in Munchen, please get in touch. I live near the Worthsee area, quite far from munchen ~40 minutes via SBahn, but I work in the heart of the city.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Getting more out of Qt Quick with OpenVG

    In Qt 5.9 is now possible to render Qt Quick applications with OpenVG when using hardware that supports it. This is made possible by a new scene graph adaptation that uses EGL and OpenVG to render Qt Quick scenes. When using Qt for Device Creation, it means that it now be possible to run with graphics hardware acceleration on some devices where today only software rendering is available.

  • Qt 5.9's OpenVG Renderer For Hardware Lacking OpenGL

    One of the many new features for the upcoming Qt 5.9 is an OpenVG renderer for hardware acceleration on some embedded platforms that lack OpenGL capabilities.

    OpenVG for the uninitiated is a 2D vector graphics API backed by The Khronos Group. It hasn't been updated in almost one decade with OpenGL ES largely taking over on the mobile/embedded front, but there still is some embedded hardware out there with still having OpenVG v1.1 drivers. There used to be an OpenVG state tracker in Mesa's Gallium3D, but that's long been dead.

  • Kdenlive status update

    Ever since the port to QT5/KF5 in 2015, Kdenlive has seen an increasing momentum to developing its full potential in being a stable and reliable video editing tool which the FLOSS community can use to create content and democratize communication. In 2016 the project saw a redesign of its visual identity (logo, website), the reintroduction of some much requested tools like rotoscoping and a Windows port. During these couple of years we’ve seen a boom in the size of the community.

  • Kdenlive's Status Ahead Of 17.04

    The Kdenlive video editor project in the KDE camp has published a new status update concerning the health of the project.

    Kdenlive developers continue seeing momentum building around their video editor since reviving it with the transition to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5. Over the past year they have added many tools, a Windows port, and other efforts to make Kdenlive pro-capable.

  • Tearing with Nvidia Proprietary Drivers on Plasma? Try this.

    This is a neat little trick that’s been making the rounds, and after seeing success with several people on Reddit I thought it was worth posting somewhere more visible. This will look at removing screen tearing (often entirely) when using Nvidia Proprietary graphics on the Plasma Desktop.

  • [Krita] Game art course released!

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  • Krita 3.1.3 Alpha released

    We’re working like crazy on the next versions of Krita — 3.1.3 and 4.0. Krita 3.1.3 will be a stable bugfix release, 4.0 will have the vector work and the python scripting. This week we’ve prepared the first 3.1.3 alpha builds for testing! The final release of 3.1.3 is planned for end of April.

    We’re still working on fixing more bugs for the final 3.1.3 release, so please test these builds, and if you find an issue, check whether it’s already in the bug tracker, and if not, report it!

  • Linux Thursday with BtrFS, Internet Privacy, KDE Hate

    It’s Thursday! And you know what that means… It’s Linux Day on the Lunduke Hour! In today’s episode Matt Hartley and I take a boat load of questions from the viewers on BtrFS, KDE, Internet Privacy, the ending of the Linux Action Show, Linux Marketing issues, and the weirdness (or lack of weirdness) of Linux.

Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released

Filed under
KDE

Qt Quick Designer now integrates a QML code editor. This allows you to use views like the Properties editor and the Navigator also for text based editing. When you use the split view, you directly see the effects of what you are doing. The graphical editor got support for adding items and tab bar to stacked containers like StackedLayout and SwipeView, a tool bar with common actions, and support for HiDPI displays.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.3 Beta Rolls Out QML Code Editor & CMake Server-Mode

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE

22 things Amarok does: the good, the bad, the ugly, and the hope

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Ask not what you can do for Amarok. Ask what Amarok can do for you!

Many years ago, just the mention of this music player would invoke shivers down my spine. It was stylish, exotic, modern, elegant, powerful. It did everything superbly, and there was always a hidden Joker up its sleeve. The plethora of options and possibilities and feature was endless. And then it all changed.

Amarok slid out of the spotlight and became just another program to play your music collection. Recently, fueled by nostalgia and perhaps vain hope, I’ve invested fresh new energy and time working with it, taming it, fighting it, loving it, hating it, trying to figure out how relevant, sleek and accessibility this player still is. My curiosity peaked with the extensive Plasma testing I did last month in my somewhat ultra-long article The State of Plasma. So I fired KDE neon once again, a brand new image, and started fiddling. Here’s the Spaghetti Western of what to expect. With a big disclaimer. Read on.

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Also: Reading old stuff

Linux Mint KDE Review: Easy And Beautiful

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Reviews

Linux mint, the most popular Linux distribution is recommended by almost all Linux users for newbies. By default, Linux mint is released with cinnamon. But thanks to the Kubuntu team, we now have a KDE edition. Well, new users are probably wondering what all this KDE thing is? KDE is a community. KDE is a compilation of software. We will look at it in more detail on the way. Mint is a whole distro, so we will look at some specific aspects, But KDE is more than just a DE and we cannot review all of its features here. I will try to cover as much as possible in limited space.

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KDE/Qt: Qt 5.9.0 beta and Krita

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Development
KDE

KDE/Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • Device Tailored Compositors with Qt Wayland at CLAAS E-Systems

    Have you heard about software in cars that run on embedded devices? Do you think that creating such software might be challenging? Well, welcome to a complete new world of complexity, welcome to the world of agriculture machines! For many years, automatic steering (on fields), terminals to control the complex mechanical operations of a self-driving 16 ton combine harvester on a soft ground, and self-optimization systems to optimize any tiny bit of your harvester, are key demands from customers. I, myself, am working at CLAAS E-Systems, the electronics and software department within the CLAAS group. Our group is well known for being among the leading manufacturers for combine harvesters, tractors and forage harvesters.

  • Qt Wayland Is Next Appearing On Tractors & Farm Equipment

    With Qt 5.8's Qt Wayland Compositor Framework taking shape, more developers are beginning to tailor a Qt Wayland compositor to their use-cases. One of those is a company specializing in farm equipment like combine harvesters, tractors, and harvesters.

    As a guest post on the official Qt blog, developer Andreas Cord-Landwehr of CLAAS E-Systems talked up Qt Wayland for their purposes in the highly-regulated agriculture industry.

  • KDevelop 5.1 Open-Source IDE Launches with LLDB and OpenCL Support, Many Changes

    The development team behind the popular, open-source, cross-platform, free and powerful KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) were proud to announce the official release and general availability of KDevelop 5.1.

    KDevelop 5.1 is now the most advanced stable version of the application, which is written entirely in Qt and designed to be used on various GNU/Linux distributions that usually ship with the KDE Plasma desktop environment, but also on the latest releases of the Microsoft Windows operating system.

KDE Plasma 5.9.4 Brings Improvements for Plasma Desktop, Workspace and Discover

Filed under
KDE

KDE released today the fourth maintenance update to the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment series, which some of you are using on your Linux-based operating systems.

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KDevelop 5.1.0 released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.1! Tons of new stuff entered KDevelop 5.1. Here's a summary of what's new in this version:

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Also:KDevelop 5.1 Released With LLDB Support, Initial OpenCL, Better Python Support

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space
    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved. In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."
  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson
    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September. Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.
  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages
    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts. Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.
  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04
    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop. I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.
  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)
    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

more of today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.