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KDE

Q&A with Aaron Seigo: How Kolab Systems Uses Open Source and Linux

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I’ve been involved since around 2001, during which time I’ve worked on a number of areas within the community. I ended up maintaining the panels and parts of the desktop shell in KDE’s 3.x desktop and from there ended up doing the ground-up redesign of the shell we now know as Plasma.

That introduced some radical (at the time) concepts such as device-independent UIs, strong business/UI separation, animation rich interfaces, visual integration of desktop services and visual distinction between the desktop shell and applications running in them.

Outside of technical work, I was also president of KDE’s global non-profit foundation, KDE e.V., and oversaw improvements in how we manage intellectual property, standardizing developer sprints, rigorous reporting and more. It was during this time that I was named one of the top 50 most influential people in IT by silicon.com.

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Kubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn - That's better

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Kubuntu has one definite advantage. It's predictable. Predictable in the sense that it will never give you a fully satisfying experience out of the box, and it will do its best to be controversial, bi-polar and restrained by default. You get a very good and modern system, but then it's almost purposefully crippled by boredom, a conservative choice of programs and missing functionality. Why, oh why. It could be such a shiny star.

Utopic Unicorn is a pretty solid release, but it does suffer from some alarming issues. The graphics stack, first and foremost. Desktop effects are also missing, and Samba printing is simply disappointing. The rest worked fine, the system was robust, there's good evidence of polish and improvements, but then it lacks pride and color. I would say 8/10, but that's not enough to win people's hearts. We've all been there, every six months, so something new is needed. Maybe Plasma 5? Aha! Stay tuned.

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Franklin Weng: The strength behind open source is the strength of contributing

Filed under
KDE
Interviews
OSS

Franklin is a 39 year old FOSS activist based in Taipei. He has coordinated KDE's zh_TW translation team since 2006, and is the core developer of ezgo (Chinese), a compilation of educational software used by schools all over Taiwan. ezgo, which in its Linux installation uses KDE by default, blends more than 100 free software applications into one localized, easy to use package.

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Release of KDE Frameworks 5.4.0

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KDE

KDE Frameworks are 60 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

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Early announce: Qt4 removal in Jessie+1

Filed under
KDE

We the Debian Qt/KDE Team want to early-announce [maintainer warning] our decision to remove Qt4 from Jessie+1. This warning is mostly targeted at upstreams.

Qt4 has been deprecated since Qt5's first release on December 19th 2012, that means almost two years ago!

So far we had bugfixes-only releases, but upstream has announced that they will end this support on august 2015. This already means we will have to do a special effort from that point on for Jessie in case RC bugs appears, so having it in Jessie+1 is simply a non-go.

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Plasma-nm 0.9.3.5 release

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KDE

I just want to inform you (those who are still running KDE 4) that we released a new version of your favorite network applet. This new release brings to you many bug fixes and should make your life easier. We really recommend to update to the new version as we, not intentionally, introduced some new issues in the previous version. Together with the new release of plasma-nm we also released our libnm-qt library which is also needed if you want to have fixes from plasma-nm properly working.

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KDE Developer Aaron Seigo Joins Kolab Systems

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Aaron Seigo is a seasoned open source developer who leads the Plasma team at KDE. He also tried to bring a Linux-based tablet to the market through his Vivaldi project. He recently joined Kolab Systems, and we talked to him as well as Kolab CEO Georg Greve to understand what Kolab does and how Aaron, a KDE developer, will help the company.

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Diving into Plasma’s 2015

Filed under
KDE

In terms of user demographic, we’re almost certain to see one thing happening with the new Plasma 5 UI, as distros start to ship it by default, this is what these new users are going to see. Not everybody in this group of users is interested in how cool the technology stack lines up, they just want to get their work done and certainly not feel impeded in their daily workflows. This is the target group which we’ve been focusing our work on in months since summer, since the release of Plasma 5.0. Wider group of users sounds pretty abstract, so let’s take some numbers: While Plasma 5 is run by a group of people already, the number of users who get it via Linux distributions is much larger than the group of early adopters. This means by the end of next year, Plasma 5 will be in the hands of millions of users, probably around 10 million, and increasing. (This is interpolated from an estimation of Plasma users in the tens of millions, with the technology adaption lifecycle taken as base.)

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Pisi Linux 1.1 KDE

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Pisi Linux has continued its activities after 1.0 and we reached our second stable version 1.1. This version resulting from intensive studies; strong, stable, comfortable to use, safe and so fast. The strength of the structure to prevent damage to your system uses hardware safely to the end. Also in this release, along with many innovations were offered to us.

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Display Managers In Plasma 5

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KDE

KDM was dropped from Plasma 5. KDM includes code from XDM dating back to 1988! It had served it's job well. However, we're now at a point where we need the backend to be Wayland ready and we want to use more modern QML in the front end. When you have to replace both the back and front ends, it's a sign to just start from scratch.

There was some work done 2 years ago into sharing code with LightDM. In the meantime a separate project was started, SDDM which is (yet another) display manager.

Although personally I was very happy with what we had with LightDM it definitely doesn't make sense to split resources, so we focussed everything on SDDM and I have been helping work on that transferring knowledge from my old project.

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