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KDE

Leftovers: KDE (Akonadi, KWin)

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KDE
  • Akonadi for e-mail needs to die

    So, I'm officially giving up on kmail2 (i.e., the Akonadi-based version of kmail) on the last one of my PCs now. I have tried hard and put in a lot of effort to get it working, but it costs me a significant amount of time and effort just to be able to receive and read e-mail - meaning hanging IMAP resources every few minutes, the feared "Multiple merge candidates" bug popping up again and again, and other surprise events. That is plainly not acceptable in the workplace, where I need to rely on e-mail as means of communication. By leaving kmail2 I seem to be following many many other people... Even dedicated KDE enthusiasts that I know have by now migrated to Trojita or Thunderbird.

  • Virtual keyboard support in KWin/Wayland 5.7

    Over the last weeks I worked on improved input device support in KWin/Wayland and support for virtual keyboard. KWin 5.7 will integrate the new QtVirtualKeyboard module which is now available under GPLv3. For us this means that we have access to a high quality QML based keyboard. For Qt it means that the virtual keyboard is exposed to more users and thanks to the open source nature it means that we can upstream fixes.

  • Virtual Keyboard Support For KWin / KDE Wayland 5.7

    The latest KWin/Wayland hacking project by Martin Gräßlin is adding virtual keyboard support to KWin for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 release.

    This virtual keyboard support is powered by the QtVirtualKeyboard module and provides a high-quality, QML-based keyboard that will work on KWin/Wayland when no hardware keyboard is available. Implementing this virtual keyboard support with Wayland compatibility was actually quite a feat, but has now become a reality thanks to the work by Martin.

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE

Plasma 5.6.4, Applications 16.04.1 and Frameworks 5.22.0 available in Chakra

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KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users, together with other package updates.

Plasma 5.6.4 includes a month's worth of bugfixes and new translations, with the changes being related to the plasma desktop and workspace, kwin, kscreen and networkmanager, among others.

Read more

Also: Chakra GNU/Linux Users Receiving KDE Plasma 5.6.4 & KDE Applications 16.04.1 Now

Kubuntu 16.04 LTS Users Receive the Latest KDE Plasma 5.6.4 Desktop, Update Now

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KDE

Kubuntu and KDE developer Marcin Sągol today announced the availability of the latest KDE Plasma 5.6.4 desktop environment in the special repositories for Kubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users.

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Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 15.17 Finally Switches the OS to KDE Plasma 5

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KDE
Gentoo

Today, May 20, 2016, Calculate Linux developer Alexander Tratsevskiy proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of Calculate Linux 15.17.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita 3.0 Up To Release Candidate Stage

    Krita, KDE's incredible digital painting and illustration program, is getting very close to their major 3.0 milestone with today's availability of their release candidate.

  • Krita 3.0 Open-Source Digital Painting Tool Is Around the Corner, RC1 Out Now

    The development cycle of the major Krita 3.0 open-source and cross-platform digital painting software is almost over, and a final release should be unveiled to users in the coming weeks.

  • A possible KRunner future and network searches

    KRunner is one of the rare areas of Plasma that have been mostly stagnating since 4.x, and is one of the rare parts of Plasma that are still known to crash. At least, the UI has improved in the last few releases thanks to Kai who rightfully became the new KRunner maintainer.

    Now, while the UI is still getting some love, the backend is mostly not. During the course of Plasma 5.x development, Aaron had a really great idea (inspired by his newfound love of Erlang) of creating a more mature infrastructure for KRunner that would (among other things) allow it never to block the UI while calculating the results. Unfortunately, this never got integrated into KRunner UI for various reasons.

KWayland joined KDE Frameworks

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KDE

The current release 5.22 of KDE Frameworks gained a new framework: KWayland. So far KWayland got released together with Plasma. KWayland entered as tier 1/integration and is only available on Linux (and other Linux-like systems).

For us working on the Wayland stack in Plasma and KDE this is a very important step. Now we can use KWayland also in other frameworks. Also with KWayland in frameworks we expose it to a larger audience. We hope that it is a useful framework for anyone using Wayland with Qt. It’s not a replacement for QtWayland, rather an addition and way more flexible by being closer to the Wayland API.

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Some new Breeze app icons in Frameworks 5.22

    Some icons I made, you can find them in KDE Frameworks 5.22

    The QOwnNotes icon became the official one. Give to this app a try, it’s super.

  • The initiation

    What will I be doing you ask? Well, as some people know Krita on Mac OS X is not quite there yet. Some of the new cool functionality added to Krita 3.0 is forcefully omitted from the OS X release. Deep down in the depths of Krita painting we paint decorations using Qt's kindly provided QPainter class. This class allows us to make pretty lines and shapes very easily, and is perfectly suited to drawing all of the overlay functionality (such as grids, cursors, guides, etc.). What could possibly go wrong there? Well, even though we are grateful to have such easy rendering functionality, the backend of those functions haven't exactly kept up with the times.

  • QtCon Call for Papers Extended!

    What have you been working on lately that you’d like to share at a QtCon talk? The Qt Community of developers wants to hear from you! Submit your proposal by Friday and get a chance to contribute to this one-off, unique Event in Berlin.

  • Care to help test Plasma 5.6.4?
  • Compiling all of Qt5, KF5, Plasma5, kdepim5, apps...

    I see a very high value in compiling my own Qt, and on top of it all the KDE-made software that I use. This makes it very easy to fix bugs and add improvements to the software I use on a day to day basis. Nowadays I think many developers use distro packages for Qt or KF5 or even the whole environment except for the one app they're working on, but in my opinion this leads to "silo" thinking, with workarounds in upper layers rather than fixing issues at the right place.

    So, here's a working and easy recipe for compiling all the Qt-based software you use.

KDE Frameworks 5.22.0 Released for KDE Plasma 5.6.4 and KDE Applications 16.04.1

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KDE

Today, May 15, 2016, KDE has had the pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of this month's KDE Frameworks 5 maintenance release, version 5.22.0, for the latest KDE Plasma 5 desktop and KDE Applications.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
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Debian and Ubuntu News

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    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

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