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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • A Usability Guy’s Journey to Creating his First KDE Tool – Part 1: Baby Steps

    These two may sound completely unrelated at first, but they both were key in sending me down this path. This article will tell the story behind 1, which is about my very first code commit to KDE. I will go into quite some detail because I feel that my journey may provide some insights for KDE.

    This story started on April 6th. I was discussing with Aleix Pol about actual vs. perceived performance in Plasma and other KDE software. One thing we agreed on was that animation speed has a big impact on perceived performance. During that discussion, we found out that the setting for the animation speed is almost impossible to find in System Settings, because it sits in a module where you would not expect it to be (Display and Monitor > Compositor), and searching for “animation speed” points you to the wrong module (this was due to an oversight when the “Desktop Effects” module was split in two and the search keywords were not adapted). The “it sits in an unexpected module” problem is about to be fixed by moving it into the “Workspace behavior” module, but first I wanted the actual bug with the search pointing to the wrong module to be fixed.

    At first, as usual, I wrote a bug report about it. Then, Aleix, being a cunning little Spaniard (*scnr*, I know you’re Catalonian), said these fateful words: “You could fix this one yourself!”. Now the cunning part was that he knew I could not defend myself by saying “But I don’t know C++ …” because the search keywords are defined in .desktop files, easily read- and writable for mere mortals like me. So, without any good argument why I couldn’t, I set out to fix it myself.

    The first obstacle on my journey was that even after years of being a KDE contributor, I still did not have a KDE developer account. The reason is simple: My contributions usually come in the form of text and mockups, not code. I describe my ideas in wiki pages, emails, forum posts, chats, review requests, bug reports, blog posts, …, but not in repositories. For this simple patch, I could have just put it up on Reviewboard or Phabricator and have someone else commit it, but if I was going to contribute code, I wanted to do it properly™.

  • It has happened!

    I have been selected for the Google Summer of Code!

    For the better part of the summer vacation, I will now be committing myself to write code for KDE to implement my project idea of implementing a virtual folder in Dolphin to make it easier to select files.

  • GSoC project accepted, now what?

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.80)

    I just made a release of KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.80), which is the first preview release of the upcoming bugfix release in the 0.6 series. Please note that the 0.6 series is still based on KDE 4.

  • KDiff3 for KDE Frameworks 5 becomes usable

    After recently starting to port KDiff3 to KDE Frameworks 5, I made a few commits today making the software actually usable.

  • Grantlee v5.1.0 (Codename Außen hart und innen ganz weich) now available

    The Grantlee community is pleased to announce the release of Grantlee version 5.1 (Mirror). Grantlee contains an implementation of the Django template system in Qt.

  • Minuet 0.1 released!

    I'm happy to announce that the very first release of Minuet is available today as part of KDE Applications 16.04 \o/.

  • News about kdepim: Allow to build standalone each applications
  • New Krita 3.0 Alpha/Development Windows Builds
  • Kdenlive: Café, release and development

    In a few days, we are going to celebrate the release of Kdenlive 16.04.0.
    If you are interested in the project, you are welcome to join us in the next Kdenlive café, a monthly IRC meeting for users and developers.

  • KDE Neon out now – An Interview with Jonathan Riddell

    Is KDE’s Neon a new Linux distribution? Is it a showcase? Is it a test bed? Neon (“tech preview”) User Edition launches today and we got Jonathan Riddell, Neon’s front runner, to explain what all the fuss is about.

  • kver’s definition of anarchy
  • Travis-CI builds of KDE projects on Archlinux chroot

    How many of you knew that KDE has a github mirror? The mirror is useful for github users/fans (who can for example star their favorite KDE projects), but can also be useful to KDE developers who don’t care about github. I was on of them, until today. Github features an excellent integration with Travis-CI. This means that you (as github user) get for free a Continuous Integration system already up and running, waiting for your commits.

  • KDE 5_16.04 for Slackware-current

    You may already have tried it through the PLASMA5 variant of the Slackware Live Edition which I uploaded yesterday, and here is the announcement of the addition of KDE 5_16.04 to my ‘ktown’ repository – the April release of the combined KDE Frameworks 5.21.0, Plasma 5.6.3 and Applications 16.04.0.

  • KDE-FreeBSD catching up

    After a long struggle with digiKam (mostly because of the libmediawiki plugin), a brief struggle with KDevelop (it is well-behaved), and a careful struggle with CMake (because lots of other ports depend on it), official ports have been updated (by Tobias Berner and Raphael Kubo da Costa) with the state-of-the-art for KDE4 from the unofficial area51 repository.

KDE Announces the Release of KDE Applications 16.04 for KDE Plasma 5 Desktop

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KDE

Today, April 20, 2016, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the final KDE Applications 16.04 software collection for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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KDE neon User Edition Tech Preview

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KDE

It’s a build of KDE neon using released software, our clever CI system watches download.kde.org for new releases such as Plasma 5.6.3 and packages them pronto. If you want to use the latest released software, this is the way to do it.

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KDE Plasma 5.6.3 Desktop Environment Released Patches a KWin Crash, Fixes Bugs

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KDE

Today, April 19, 2016, KDE announced the immediate availability of the third maintenance release in the stable KDE Plasma 5.6 series of the popular desktop environment used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems by default.

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fresh breeze for Ubuntu

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

1,5 years ago the VDG start with an icon theme for LibreOffice to guaranty an consistent look and feel for Plasma users. Now this new icon theme Breeze was used by default in the KDE Linux distributions and on Mac OS X.

Breeze is a monochrome icon theme and fits well into modern Desktops like Plasma and OS X but the second reason is that the Breeze icon set is a complete icon set. We can support 100 % (and I mean 100 %) of the needed LibreOffice icons. In addition Breeze supports dark colour themes AND 32 px icon size. This is unique because only the default icon set is that much feature complete.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • [Utilizing Vulkan Within Qt]
  • The last weekend on Earth

    In the last two months, tech developers, helped by students from India in order to the Google Summer of Code, worked hard, together with the editing team, on new features and fuctions that we wanted to implement in the site. So, tech developers decided to release WikiToLearn 0.7 on saturday April 09. But something went wrong, and what would have to be an ordinary saturday of releasing became a hellish saturday.

  • Audio Volume improvements in Plasma 5.7

    Plasma 5.4 introduced plasma-pa (new audio volume applet and KCM) to replace KMix, however it was missing few important features in the initial release. Unfortunately, there was no progress after that.

  • Vote Loony to Add K to the Welsh Language
  • Horde of Cuteness fundraiser
  • Cross-compiling Krita using MXE

    So, using MXE, I built Qt and most dependencies. Still missing are Vc, OpenColorIO, GSL, Poppler-qt5 and openjpeg. I also needed to remove some of the hacks we did to make Krita compile with MSVC: we had added a couple of dummy header files to provide things like nothl and friends (these days superseded by QtEndian). A 3rd-party library we embed, xcftools, had its own equivalent of that stuff. But apart from that...

  • Interview with Esfenodon

    I’m always searching for the way to use as much open source software as possible at University. Maybe it was as simple as searching google for it. Krita software, hmmm, interesting, let’s give it a try. Maybe the Krita name was familiar to me because some time ago I read about a collection of open source tools for audiovisual creativity.

  • How do you use Grantlee?

    It is also used in the Cutelyst web framework for generating html, templated emails and any other use-cases users of that framework have.

    There is also rather advanced Grantlee integration available in KDevelop for new class generation, using the same principles I blogged about some years ago.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Neon Project Rebased on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Upgrade Now

    Ex-Kubuntu maintainer Jonathan Riddell has announced the upgrade of the KDE Neon base packages from Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) branch.

    The developer introduced the KDE Neon project to the Linux community at the end of January, during the FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers' European Meeting) 2016 event, which was welcomed in particular by those who love having the latest KDE technologies on top of an Ubuntu Linux base.

  • Qt 5.7 Beta Is In Sight

    Qt 5.7 continues moving along and due to the concurrent release work with the much-delayed Qt 5.6 that finally shipped in March, the Qt 5.7 beta is already imminent.

    The Qt Company today uploaded Qt 5.7 beta packages for Windows, Linux, Mac, and then the source packages. These Qt 5.7.0 beta packages will be promoted to being the official beta in a few days time if no serious bugs are discovered by early testers.

  • Kolab Systems AG and Collabora's CloudSuite

    The chemistry created by the Kolab Systems-Collabora Productivity partnership enabled CloudSuite, the first 100% open-source, enterprise-grade cloud office suite. Kolab Systems' contribution is its Kolab open-source groupware and collaboration framework; Collabora Productivity is the architect behind LibreOffice Online, the cloud-based office productivity suite. The integration of CloudSuite into Kolab allows users to work on documents simultaneously using a full-featured on-line office suite.

KTorrent KF5 release

Filed under
KDE

KTorrent for KF5 is available officially, please spread the news.

One known issue that struck many people is downloading to ntfs partition being slow even on ssd (!) and causing ui unresponsiveness (the root cause is inside ntfs driver). In the next release i will introduce an autodetection of ntfs and suggestion to download to a non-ntfs partition with moving files to ntfs after download finishes.

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KDE Plasma 5.7 Desktop Environment to Offer a Much-Improved Audio Volume Applet

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KDE

KDE developer David Rosca has recently talked about the improvements coming to the Audio Volume applet of the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, which should be implemented in the next update.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more