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KDE: Google Summer of Code, kdenlive, Neon, Latte Dock, Digikam

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KDE
  • Farewell GSoC’17

    It has been a great journey, thanks to my mentor, KDE and digiKam coordinators, and great community for the continuous feedback and the encouraging comments. I’m proud to be contributing to this great software and planning to continue.

  • Autumn is here (wait, this is GSoC, not GoT)

    So, as summer is coming to an end, Google Summer of Code is also wrapping up, and the KDevelop Rust plugin is looking good at this point. It now supports semantic highlighting, go-to-definition, renaming declarations, some code completion, debugging, highlighting code errors, and code formatting. I'll go into a bit more detail for the last three since they were the most recent additions. 

    I also focused on a lot of minor improvements this past month to make the plugin easier to build and use, to make it more reliable, etc., so at this point kdev-rust is a solid basis for anyone looking for a Rust IDE.

  • [kdenlive] Design choices ahead

    As many of you may know by now, we are currently doing a code refactoring which will be taking a step forward in making our software more suitable for professional use. In the process, we are facing some critical design choices, and want to hear the opinion of the editors of the community.

  • RX Vega + AMDGPU-PRO + KDE Neon

    Earlier this week I got my dirty hands on an RX Vega 64 card to run on my daily workstation. With the aim to eventually run open drivers in the future my main goal for now was to get AMDGPU-PRO running for day-to-day activities, possibly also moving to Wayland from X11. I’m very interested in Wayland as Kwin has several Wayland-only enhancements, and even if I wouldn’t use it now I wanted to be ready for testing.  The Vega card would be replacing an Nvidia GTX 1080 card.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.1

    Latte Dock v0.7.1  has been released containing many important fixes and improvements for which you can find more details in the end of the article.

  • KDE: Libmediawiki has been released!
  • KDE: New release for Libkvkontakte!

    The release enables distribution packagers to enable the new features in the latest Digikam release.

Events: GNOME 3.26 "Manchester", GUADEC 2017, Randa Roundup, and SRECon17 Europe

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KDE
OSS
GNOME
  • Waiting for GNOME 3.26 Stable Release!

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" planned to be released at 13 September 2017. Reading the FeaturePlans and Schedule from its wiki makes me want to run it sooner! I hope Ubuntu will successfully include 3.26 on Artful Aardvark release so I can make a review for it later. However, this short article mentions some of its new feature, new apps, some links from GUADEC 2017's participants, and further GNOME links. Enjoy!

  • GNOME GUADEC 2017: Presentations, Videos, & Links

    GUADEC 2017, the latest GNOME Project annual conference, has been held at 28 July-2 August 2017 in Manchester, United Kingdom. I collect as many resources as possible here including presentations & videos (so you can download them), poster & template, write-ups by attendees, and of course the links about GUADEC 2017. So, if you didn't attend GUADEC 2017, you still can find the resources here! Enjoy!

  • Randa Roundup - Part I

    Our intrepid developers are getting ready to make their way to Randa, and we are gradually finding out what they will be doing up there in the Swiss mountains.

    As Valorie said in a recent blog post, accessibility is useful for everybody at some point or another. Clear, highly contrasted icons, easy to reach keyboard shortcuts, and scalable fonts are things we can all appreciate most of the time, whether we have any sort of physical disability or not.

    With that in mind, Jean-Baptiste Mardelle will be working on Kdenlive, KDE's video editing software. He'll be reviewing the user interface; that is, the different panels, toolbars, etc., to make it easier to use for people who start editing for the first time. He'll also be working on packaging - creating AppImages and Flatpaks - so the latest versions of Kdenlive can be installed anywhere without having to worry about dependencies.

  • Takeaways from SRECon17 Europe

    As every last three years in a row, I attended SRECon in Europe. I can literally say this year was totally broken comparing with former conferences. I think it’s because I had much higher expectations from this conference. The first shot in 2014 was more than awesome, but year to year it’s getting worse. Almost all talks from Google were like a summary of every chapter in SRE book. We just skipped all the rest of the talks sourced by Google.

KDE's Leaner Experience On openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Ubuntu 17.04

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KDE
SUSE
Ubuntu

With the Power Use, RAM + Boot Times With Unity, Xfce, GNOME, LXDE, Budgie and KDE Plasma tests this week, many expressed frustration over the heavy KDE packaging on Ubuntu leading to the inflated results for the Plasma 5 desktop tests. For some additional reference, here is how KDE Plasma (and GNOME Shell) compare when running on Ubuntu 17.04 vs. openSUSE Tumbleweed.

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Kubuntu Artful beta 1 milestone released today

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KDE

I'm happy to announce that Kubuntu Artful beta 1 milestone released today, having passed all the mandatory testing, thanks to lots of testers! Thanks so much to each of you.

If possible, we'll also be participating in Beta 2 with the next round of KDE bug-fix releases for the last testing milestone before release of Kubuntu 17.10 on 19 October 2017.

Release notes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ArtfulAardvark/Beta1/Kubuntu

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Also: Lubuntu Artful Aardvark Beta 1 has been released!

Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Beta Released

KDE: Plasma 5.10.5, Falkon, Polkit Support in KIO, KTorrent 5.1, SDDM 0.15

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KDE

KDE: GSoC Projects and Belated Akademy 2017 Coverage

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KDE
  • GSoC - Third month analysis

    My aim was to work on note names and piano composition and those are the most basic activies kids need to learn. A child should learn note names first to have a good understanding of note position and naming convention. Then the activity piano composition should be played to have the knowledge of musical notation and musical staff, then comes the play piano activity which explains how the piano keyboard can play music as written on musical staff and then the rhythms are learnt on the basis of what they see and hear in play rhythm. In the last two weeks I worked on completing Note names which you can test in my branch note names.

  • GSoC Final report - Part 1: Okular

    This is the first post of a 3-part series where I will go into technical details of my summer of code project. I will give a high-level overview about the current state of my written code, show you what’s supposed to work and how you can try that; and what still needs to be done.

    Then I will write about some “Gotcha!” moments I have experienced in the past few months and what I could learn from them. Those aren’t in any way ordered and are there to explain why my project turned out like it did - and hopefully even help some future GSoC students along the way.

  • GSoC Final report - Part 2: Gwenview

    A first revision of my patch is up on phabricator, which works for raster graphics. Your holiday pictures should now open in all their details and no longer be a blurry mess!

  • GSoC Final report - Part 3: Summary

    I can’t believe the three months are already over, the time flies when you’re having fun.

    Unfortunately, I couldn’t tackle everything I had planned - the rendering in Okular and Gwenview was much complexer than I anticipated. Once again, it needs much more time to modify existing code than to write new one.

    Nevertheless, I enjoyed this challenge and hope the code for Okular will be merged in the next days and can therefore be in the next release - making HiDPI a more pleasant experience for the whole KDE community.

  • Akademy 2017

    This year I attended my first ever conference, Akademy, the annual world summit of KDE.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 1 testing

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KDE

Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 1 images are now available for testing.

The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October. The final Beta 1 milestone will be available on August 31st.

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Last week in Kube and End of KDE GSoC Projects

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KDE
  • Last week in Kube

    “Kube is a modern communication and collaboration client built with QtQuick on top of a high performance, low resource usage core. It provides online and offline access to all your mail, contacts, calendars, notes, todo’s and more. With a strong focus on usability, the team works with designers and UX experts from the ground up, to build a product that is not only visually appealing but also a joy to use.”

  • Summing up my GSoC experience

    The best thing about this experience is that I learnt a lot of new and exciting stuff: new technologies, pattern and development methodologies. Not only I improved my skills with modern web development tools but I also got quite proficient with the Vue.js and Webpack ecosystems. At the same time I got a bit better at writing and structuring documentation, something that many developers forget about.

  • Finalizing the GSoC project for KStars

    I worked on the KStars during this summer to improve the codebase with C++11 features with Google Summer of Code. I spent the last month to write the first GUI tests for KStars and KStars Lite. KStars Lite can be built and run also on Linux host now although it was developed for Android by a previous GSoC student in 2016. Additional contributions include fixing some bugs found by Clang Sanitizers, usability improvements and templeted FITS decoding. The GSoC period was successful, the goals were reached, but if I would have still more time...

  • My experiences with Summer of Code 2017

    How quickly the summer ran away, in a wild mix of fun, frustration, development, and success! It seems like just yesterday that I received news of working with Marble in the summer, yet now September quickly approaches, and it’s time to look back on all our experiences this summer.

  • Final Blog Gsoc 2017

    Over the past three months, I’ve been working on a telemetry project for the graphic editor Krita. I achieved almost all the goals. A working prototype was created, you can help in its testing by downloading a test version of the Krita with telemetry support. link

  • GSoC - Final Period

    I implemented some scripts to the showcase and some new plugins as well. You can find my task here and see more details about my progress during GSoC.

KDevelop 5.1.2 released

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Development
KDE

We are pleased to announce the release of KDevelop version 5.1.2, the second bug-fix release for the 5.1 series. This update contains bug fixes only, and we highly recommend all users of KDevelop 5.1.x to switch to this version. Given that it has been a few months since the release of KDevelop 5.1.1, this version contains quite a lot of changes.

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QtQuick and QProcess

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KDE
  • Warning: NVIDIA driver 384.69 seems to be broken with QtQuick

    Just a short warning to KDE Plasma users with NVIDIA drivers. Lately we have seen many crash reports from NVIDIA users who updated to version 384.xx. Affected is at least KWin and KScreenLocker, which means one cannot unlock the session any more. The crash happens in the NVIDIA driver triggered from somewhere in QtQuick, so completely outside of our code.

  • GSoC- Port of Lua to QProcess

    Hi, it has been a bit long since I last wrote a blog about the status of my GSoC project. This has been majorly because I got a job and it has kept me busy ever since. Anyway, I managed to complete my second month target , mostly by working on weekends. Here’s a quick update on what I did during the 2nd month

  • GSoC – Port of R to QProcess

    During the first two months I had ported 2 back ends to QProcess, which includes Lua and Qalculate. For the last month I was left with 2 more backends , which were  R and Python .  Due to time constraint I decided that I will be working on just one of the two. Python’s code base was a bit large because of the two versions of Python(2.7 and 3), hence I decided to work on R.

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