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KDE

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.43.0

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KDE

KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.43.0.

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.43 Released With KHolidays Module, glTF/Coillada Highlighting

KDE/Qt: Slackware, Video, Kate, KDE Slimbook, SFXR Qt

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KDE
  • February release of the Plasma5 Desktop for Slackware

    Yesterday, I uploaded my Febrary’18 release of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware-current. The KDE-5_18.02 release contains: KDE Frameworks 5.43.0, Plasma 5.12.0 and Applications 17.12.2. All based on Qt 5.9.4 and exclusive for Slackware–current because as explained in a previous post, I stopped providing regular Plasma 5 version updates for Slackware 14.2 (only security updates).

  • KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Released : Here’s What’s New

    KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS is the second long-term support release from the Plasma 5 team. We have been working hard, focusing on speed and stability for this release. Boot time to desktop has been improved by reviewing the code for anything which blocks execution. The team has been triaging and fixing bugs in every aspect of the codebase, tidying up artwork, removing corner cases, and ensuring cross-desktop integration. For the first time, we offer our Wayland integration on long-term support, so you can be sure we will continue to provide bug fixes and improvements to the Wayland experience.

  • Rendering issues and the power of open source

    After a long time of constant distraction by my daily work, I finally found again a bit time to take care of KTextEditor/Kate/… issues.

    One thing that really started to be an itch I wanted to scratch is some rendering fault that occur with ‘special’ font sizes.

  • KDE launches updated Slimbook II Linux laptops with faster Intel Core processors

    A little more than a year ago, Linux developers KDE and a Spanish hardware manufacturer joined forces to offer the KDE Slimbook, a 13.3-inch laptop running a Ubuntu-based OS with mid-range specs and a mid-range price. Now KDE is back with the Slimbook II, which, like many notebook sequels, is a little bit faster, a little bit thinner, and a little bit lighter than its predecessor.

  • SFXR Qt

    As I mentioned in my previous article about adding sounds to Pixel Wheels, I started yet-another side project: SFXR Qt. This is a QtQuick port of SFXR, a retro sound-effect generator by DrPetter.

KDE: Discover, GammaRay, Plasma 5.12 on FreeBSD

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KDE
  • This week in Discover, part 5

    This week Discover gained a lot of little UI polish improvements, and Discover developers also fixed a major crash present in 5.12.

  • GammaRay 2.9.0 Release

    We have released version 2.9.0 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay. GammaRay allows you to observe behavior and data structures of Qt code inside your program live at runtime. GammaRay 2.9 introduces a number of new features interesting to Qt Quick, QWidgets, Qt 3D and non-graphical Qt users alike.

  • GammaRay 2.9 Released For Inspecting Qt Applications
  • Plasma 5.12 on FreeBSD

    “Of course it runs FreeBSD, too” is something I said a lot in the past week (regarding the Pine64, mostly, but also about my Slimbook). I also said “Of course it runs on FreeBSD, too” a lot. Naturally area51, the unofficial KDE-FreeBSD ports tree, contains the latest in released KDE software. Plasma 5.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.42, with Qt 5.9.4. We just bumped Qt to pick up a patch from KDE’s Eike Hein to fix some weird hover behavior. So we’re all up-to-date on the KDE front, and I’ve been running it as my main desktop since the build finished in poudriere.

KDE: Slimbook, Decade of Plasma, Kubuntu Bionic and More

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KDE
  • Who, wha, FOSDEM?

    Underneath the Konqui Pinebook is my KDE Slimbook. Someone was handing out Nopetopus stickers; I wish I had gotten more. My Slimbook is starting to look a little beat-up — which is good, from a Hitch-Hikers-Guide-to-the-Galaxy point of view, since it’s been baked under the suns of Kakrafoon^WAlmeria, shivered in the snows of Allosymanius Syneca^W^WBrussels. At the KDE booth we were also could show a second-generation machine: the KDE Slimbook II (in Spanish, their English site doesn’t mention it yet). A faster, brighter version of the Free-Software friendly laptop with Linux and KDE Plasma pre-installed. This generation is a little more angled / chunky than the previous generation. It might get fewer “why do you guys have Macbooks .. oh, hey” comments. So an aluminum but not-quite-clamshell look might be more distinctive.

  • A Decade of Plasma

    I realised that it’s now a decade of KDE releasing its Plasma desktop.  The KDE 4 release event was in January 2008.  Google were kind enough to give us their office space and smoothies and hot tubs to give some talks and plan a way forward.

    The KDE 4 release has gained something of a poor reputation, at the time we still shipped Kubuntu with KDE 3 and made a separate unsupported release for Plasma, but I remember it being perfectly useable and notable for being the foundation that would keep KDE software alive.  It had been clear for sometime that Kicker and the other elements of the KDE 3 desktop were functional but unlikely to gain much going forward.  When Qt 4 was announced back in (I’m pretty sure) 2004 Akademy in Ludwigsberg it was seen as a chance to bring KDE’s desktop back up to date and leap forward.  It took 4 long years and to keep community momentum going we had to release even if we did say it would eat your babies.

  • Heading out of winter and into Spring

    In KDE, Plasma 5.12 has been released, and it is great! It has been released in time to make it into Kubuntu Bionic, our next big release which will become an LTS. Plasma 5.12 is a great fit there, since it is also an LTS. After living through the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerability early-exposure, it feels great to finally be back on track. We have it available right now in Artful (17.10) as well: https://kubuntu.org/news/plasma-5-12-arrives-in-backport-ppa-for-kubuntu-17-10-artful-aardvark/. I'm using it now.

  • KDE Applications 18.04 Schedule finalized
  • print-manager 0.4.0

    This last month I decided to do some work on print-manager, it’s code dates back to 2010, so it’s 8 years old now, my last commits where on 2014, after that Jan Grulich did the KF5/Qt5 port and last year I tried to do some improvements but only managed to do a single commit.

  • App popularity in Discover

    Currently, Discover sorts apps by popularity. In this case, popularity means “number of ratings”, and ratings come from user reviews. This is why GNOME Tweak Tool shows up first in Discover’s browse list: apparently it’s very popular among GNOME users, and they’ve written lots of reviews about it. We should all follow their lead and write some quality reviews about our favorite software; this helps the best apps bubble up to the top, and users love reading reviews from other users when determining whether or not to install an app.

  • SoK 2018 wrap-up report

Official KDE Plasma 5.12 Release Now in Tumbleweed

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KDE
SUSE

KDE Plasma 5.12 transitioned from it beta version of 5.11.95 to the official release in an openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot earlier this week.

On the same day of the upstream release, Tumbleweed snapshot 20180206 brought the new desktop software to its thousands of rolling release users. Improved performance and several new features are available in Plasma 5.12 like Wayland-only Night Color feature that allows adjustments to the screen color temperature to reduce eye strain and the System Activity and System Monitor display per-process graphs for the CPU usage. The new KDE Store offers a wide selection of addons that are ready to be installed. Plasma 5.12 is the second long-term support (LTS) release from the Plasma 5 team and will be the version used in openSUSE’s traditional distribution openSUSE Leap 15, which is expected to be released this spring.

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Also: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Already Shipping KDE Plasma 5.12, Mesa 18.0

OpenSUSE Leap 15 Will Ship With Plasma Wayland Option

The New KDE Slimbook II: A sleek and powerful Plasma-based Ultrabook

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KDE

To start with, it comes with a choice between an Intel i5: 2.5 GHz Turbo Boost 3.1 GHz - 3M Cache CPU, or an Intel i7: 2.7 GHz Turbo Boost 3.5 GHz with a 4M Cache. This makes the KDE Slimbook II 15% faster on average than its predecessor. The RAM has also been upgraded, and the KDE Slimbook now sports 4, 8, or 16 GBs of DDR4 RAM which is 33% faster than the DDR3 RAM installed on last year's model.

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KDE: KMyMoney 5.0.0, Plasma 5.12, Qt Creator 4.6 Beta, AtCore

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KDE
  • KMyMoney 5.0.0 released

    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present version 5.0.0 of its open source Personal Finance Manager.

    As with every release, the KMyMoney development team has been working hard to make this release better and easier to use in every way. We have also made quite a few improvements. We are confident you will like what you see.

    The largest amount of work has gone towards basing this version on KDE Frameworks. Many of the underlying libraries used by the application have been reorganized and improved, but most of that is behind the scenes, and not directly visible to the end user. Some of the general look and feel may have changed, but the basic functionality of the program remains the same, aside from intentional improvements and additions.

  • KMyMoney 5.0 Released, Ported To KDE Frameworks 5

    KMyMoney, the KDE personal finance manager program, has reached version 5.0 and with that big "5" release it's been ported to KDE Frameworks 5.

    KMyMoney 5.0 is now running on KDE Frameworks 5 and the many changes involved there with adapting to new/updated libraries. There has also been bug fixes along the way, improvements to generating money reports, support for logarithmic axes in report graphics, support for more currencies, and a variety of bug fixes both user-facing and other internal code improvements.

  • Plasma 5.12 LTS is in KDE neon User Editions

    Plasma 5.12 LTS was launched today after some months focusing on speed and stability of the original and best Linux desktop.

    We’ve updated the packages in KDE neon User Edition and in KDE neon User LTS Edition. The installable image is also updated.

  • Plasma 5.12.0

    Plasma 5.12 LTS is the second long-term support release from the Plasma 5 team. We have been working hard, focusing on speed and stability for this release. Boot time to desktop has been improved by reviewing the code for anything which blocks execution. The team has been triaging and fixing bugs in every aspect of the codebase, tidying up artwork, removing corner cases, and ensuring cross-desktop integration. For the first time, we offer our Wayland integration on long-term support, so you can be sure we will continue to provide bug fixes and improvements to the Wayland experience.

  • The future of distros

    Today KDE released Plasma 5.12 with Long Term Support–the culmination of more than a year of work. It’s really awesome, and we think you’ll love it!

  • Qt Creator 4.6 Beta released

    The possibly most noteworthy and least directly visible change is that we upgraded the backend for the Clang code model from Clang 3.9 to Clang 5.0. This enables support for many C++17 features that were not available in Clang 3.9. The Clang code model is not used by default. Open Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and turn on the ClangCodeModel plugin to enable it.

  • Qt Creator 4.6 Beta Rolls Out With C++17 Features, Navigation Improvements

    The Qt Company this morning announced the beta availability of the Qt Creator 4.6 integrated development environment.

    While it has been two months to the day since the Qt Creator 4.5 release, there is a fair amount of changes in store for the Qt Creator 4.6 release.

    Thanks to Qt Creator 4.6 Beta upgrading its Clang code model back-end from v3.9 to v5.0, there is now support for many more C++17 features. Qt Creator 4.6 also now allows for integrating Clang-Tidy and Clazy warnings into diagnostic messages within the C++ editor.

  • AtCore: 100 Downloads \o/

    Last week we made the first release of AtCore. But before that, we left AtCore on the beta version for more than a month until the 1.0 release. With the 3 months that AtCore is out for public use, we didn’t receive any bug report, but a lot of congrats and feature requests.

Qt Creator 4.6 Beta released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.6 Beta!
C++ Support

The possibly most noteworthy and least directly visible change is that we upgraded the backend for the Clang code model from Clang 3.9 to Clang 5.0. This enables support for many C++17 features that were not available in Clang 3.9. The Clang code model is not used by default. Open Help > About Plugins (Qt Creator > About Plugins on macOS) and turn on the ClangCodeModel plugin to enable it.

Read more

Also: Qt Creator 4.6 Beta Rolls Out With C++17 Features, Navigation Improvements

KDE/GNOME: Qt, WikiToLearn, GNOME Shell and GTK

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KDE
GNOME
  • Sharing Files on Android or iOS from or with your Qt App – Part 3
  • WikiToLearn migration, why?

    Well, currently WikiToLearn runs on MediaWiki, which is a good model for dealing with an encyclopedia but, when you are trying to build a more structured content, it doesn’t fit.

    For the release 1.0 we have developed CourseEditor, which tries to make the unstructured content more structured, for example offering a drag-and-drop UI to manage a course structure.

  • On-Screen Keyboard Improvements, Thunderbolt UI Land In GNOME Shell

    Last minute work ahead of the imminent UI/feature freeze for GNOME 3.28 landed on Monday for the GNOME Shell.

    Most notable to the work that landed on Monday is the Thunderbolt policy provider and indicator. These are the UI/shell elements to Red Hat's Bolt project for dealing with secure handling of Thunderbolt peripherals when connected to Linux systems. The GNOME Shell bits interface with the Bolt daemon via the org.freedesktop.bolt D-Bus service. Great to see this UI work land in time for GNOME 3.28.

  • GTK+ 4.0 Gets More House Cleaning, Dropping Old Version References Saves ~7k L.O.C

    Yesterday I wrote about GTK4 dropping the Mir display back-end in favor of the Wayland back-end. Additionally, the "big GDK lock" was also stripped out. The latest is some additional cleaning to lighten the tool-kit code-base by about seven thousand lines of code.

    The latest significant cleanup is removing old GTK 2.x/3.x version references in the code and documentation. By dropping these old version annotations, GTK+ 4.0 saw nearly eight thousand lines of code removed but just over one thousand new insertions across more than 400 files.

Plasma 5.12 arrives in backport PPA for Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

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KDE

Users of Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark can now update to the newly released Plasma 5.12.0 via our backports PPA.

See the Plasma 5.12 release announcement and the release video below for more about the new features available.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Released With Much Better Wayland Support, Other Improvements

Plasma 5.12 is out, and it is faster, stabler, and has more features than ever

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More in Tux Machines

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.