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KDE and GNOME GSoC: Falkon, WikiToLearn, Nautilus and Pitivi

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KDE
Google
GNOME
  • The Joy of GSoC Smile

    Wooo... this is the last day of coding phase of GSoC. I am writing this blog to share my experience and work done in the coding phase. I want to specially thank my mentor David Rosca for his help, suggestions and reviews. This was my first exposure to the KDE community and I am proud that it was great. I really enjoyed the whole program from proposal submission - intermediate evals - then now this final evaluation. Also, I had learned a lot working on my project. Frankly speaking, I didn't knew about i18n and l10n much but with the help of my mentor now I have a quite good understanding of how these works and are implemented. I can truly say this was one of my best summer vacations.

  • What’s next for WikiToLearn?

    Google Summer of Code is finishing and many things have been done on WikiToLearn since previous post. A little recap is needed.

    Talking with mentors has been crucial because they told me to focus on finishing CRUD interaction with API backend instead of working on “history mode” viewer.

  • GSoC 2018 Final Evaluation

    As GSoC is coming to an end, I am required to put my work altogether in order for it to be easily available and hopefully help fellow/potential contributors work on their own projects. 

    [...]

    At its prestige, through this project we will have tests both for most critical and used operations of Nautilus, and for the search engines we use. Further on, I’ll provide links for all of my merge requests and dwell a bit on their ins and outs while posting links to my commits:

  • GTK+ 4 and Nautilus </GSoC>

    Another summer here at GNOME HQ comes to an end. While certainly eventful, it unfortunately did not result in a production-ready Nautilus port to GTK+ 4 (unless you don’t intend to use the location entry or any other entry, but more on that later).

  • Pitivi Video Editor Gains UI Polish, Video Preview Resizing

    The latest Google Summer of Code 2018 is allowing some excellent work to be done on some excellent open source projects.

    Among them Pitivi, the non-linear video editor built using GTK and Gstreamer and offering up a basic video editing feature set.

    Over the past few months, Harish Fulara, a Computer Science student, has worked on improving the application’s greeter dialog and on adding support dynamic resizing of the video preview box.

KDE and GNOME: CMake, CPU Usage and Student Work on Pitivi

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KDE
GNOME
  • Qt1 CMake port and more Akademy crazyness

    So, my plans was always finish the full KDE1 port, and now on Akademy i have some time to get back to this pet project. Starting on Qt1 porting entirely to CMake because the experience on Qt2 was so good that i decided going back to that and do some of the same love on Qt1.

    KDE 1 for that new port next. For now, i’m working on github, so https://github.com/heliocastro/qt1

  • KDE Plasma 5.14's Lock Screen Will No Longer Eat Your CPU Resources On Old Hardware

    With KDE Plasma 5 right now it turns out that if you have relied upon CPU-based software rendering, when hitting Plasma's lock-screen it would actually go CPU-wild -- as far as maxing out the CPU to 100% utilization, thereby consuming a lot of power and generating excess heat. That will be fixed for KDE Plasma 5.14.0.

    Since May has been a bug report about the KScreenLocker greeter process going to 100% CPU usage and needing to wait 5~10 seconds after entering the user password before the screen would actually unlock. Several others also reported similar issues of this lock-screen managing to consume a lot of the CPU resources, including on ARM boards and older hardware.

  • [GSoC’18] Pitivi’s UI Polishing – Final Report

    As part of Google Summer of Code 2018, I worked on the project Pitivi: UI Polishing. This is my final report to showcase the work that I have done during the program.

  • Pitivi's User Interface Is Getting Better Thanks To GSoC, Plus Other GNOME Improvements

    If you have been less than satisfied with the user-interface of the Pitivi non-linear open-source video editor for Linux, you may want to try out their next release.

    Student developer Harish Fulara spent his summer working on polishing the open-source video editor's interface as part of Google Summer of Code 2018.

Akademy 2018 Day 1

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KDE

Akademy 2018 got off to a wet start with rains accompanying all attendees pouring into Vienna for KDE's largest annual community conference. Although the Pre-Registration event was held on Day Zero (Friday the 10th) and it was a fun-filled affair, Akademy kicked off in earnest on Saturday, with talks, panels and demonstrations. Read on to find out about Day 1 of Akademy and all that transpired:

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GSoC: KDE and GNOME Final Reports

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KDE
GNOME
  • GSoC 2018: Final week

    Coming to the last week, the activity Note_names is finally developed and being tested on different platforms.

    Principle: This activity aims to teach sight reading the musical notes and their position on the staff by presenting several notes one-by-one with animation from the right of the staff sliding to the right of the clef image. The user will get the combination of all the notes he has learned previously and the current targetted notes from the dataset. Only the reference notes are colored as red and the user is made to learn the notes around it using it as a leverage. One has to correct enough notes to get a 100% and advance to next stage.

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: It's a Wrap

    As probably most of you already know, or recently found out, at the beginning of this week the GSoC coding period officially ended, and it is time for us, GSoC students, to submit our final evaluations and the results we achieved thus far. This blog post, as you can probably tell from the title, will be a summary of all of the work I put into modernising Five or More throughout the summer months.

    My main task was rewriting Five or More in Vala since this simple and fun game did not find its way to the list of those included in the Games Modernisation Initiative. This fun, strategy game consists of aligning, as often as possible, five or more objects of the same shape and color, to make them disappear and score points.

  • The end of GSoC

    After three months of hard work and a lot of coding the Google Summer of Code is over. I learned a lot and had a lot fun. GSoC was an amazing experience and I encourage everybody to participate in future editions. At this point I’ve been a contributor to GNOME for nearly a year, and I plan on sticking around for a long time. I really hope that other GSoC students also found it so enjoyable, and keep contributing to GNOME or other Free Software Projects.

KDE Frameworks 5.49.0 Released for KDE Plasma 5.13 with over 200 Improvements

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KDE

KDE Frameworks consists of more than 70 add-on libraries for the open-source and cross-platform Qt application framework that offers a wide range of commonly needed functionality, as well as many core components and apps that are required for the KDE Plasma desktop environment to function correctly.

For the past several years, new KDE Frameworks versions are published every month in the second Saturday of the month, and KDE Frameworks 5.49.0 is the release the KDE Project prepared for the month of August 2018, bringing various improvements and addressing numerous bugs.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.49 Released With Many Changes

Budgie Desktop, KDE and GNOME

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME
  • Summertime Solus | The Roundup #7

    For those that missed our announcements of last week’s Hackfest, you can watch it via the video embedded below. Most of this roundup will cover the work that has been done since the last roundup (in the specific sections in this blog) as well as the Hackfest, so if you don’t want to sit through the 10 hours of content, feel free to just keep reading.

  • Solus Linux & Its Budgie Desktop Seeing Summer 2018 Improvements

    The Solus Project has shared some of the work they've been engaged in this summer with their Linux distribution as well as their GTK3-based Budgie Desktop Environment.

  • Community Data Analytics Are Going to Akademy

    If you are interested in community data analytics, you will have several opportunities to discuss them during Akademy.

    Firstly, there will be my talk titled Bringing Community Data Analysis Back to KDE (why the hell did I use "Analysis" there... I only used "Analytics" everywhere so far, odd). It will happen on Saturday at 15:30 in room IE7. The slot is a bit small for the topic, but I'll try my best to create interest. Indeed you can catch me around talks to chat about it, and...

    Secondly, there will be a BoF "Discussing Community Data Analytics" on Monday at 10:30 in room 127. We hope to see people coming up with interesting questions to explore or willing to lend a hand in those explorations. See you there!

  • The birth of a new runtime

    Runtimes are a core part of the flatpak design. They are a way to make bundling feasible, while still fully isolating from the host system. Application authors can bundle the libraries specific to the application, but don’t have to care about the lowlevel dependencies that are uninteresting (yet important) for the application.

    Many people think of runtimes primarily as a way to avoid duplication (and thus bloat). However, they play two other important roles. First of all they allow an independent stream of updates for core libraries, so even dead apps get fixes. And secondly, they allow the work of the bundling to be shared between all application authors.

    [...]

    This runtime has the same name, and its content is very similar, but it is really a complete re-implementation. It is based on a new build system called BuildStream, which is much nicer and a great fit for flatpak. So, no more Yocto, no more buildbake, no multi-layer builds!

    Additionally, it has an entire group of people working on it, including support from Codethink. Its already using gitlab, with automatic builds, CI, etc, etc. There is also a new release model (year.month) with a well-defined support time. Also, all the packages are much newer!

    Gnome is also looking at using this as the basics for its releases, its CI system and eventually the Gnome runtime.

KDE: Astronomy on KDE, MQTT/GSoC, Konversation Tip

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KDE
  • Astronomy on KDE

    I recently switched to KDE and Plasma as my main desktop environment, so I thought I'd start digging into some of the scientific software available on KDE. First up is KStars, the desktop astronomy program.

  • LabPlot's MQTT in the finish line

    Hello everyone. GSoC is coming to its end, so I think that I should give a report about what's been done since the last post, and also make a brief evaluation, summary of the project itself.

    As I've written in my last post, the main focus was on improving the quality of the code, cleaning, optimizing and properly documenting it. And also making it more comestible for other developers.

    The next step was searching for bugs and then fixing them. In order to do this properly, I implemented a unit test for the main MQTT related features. This proved to be useful since it helped discover several hidden bugs and errors which were all corrected. The main features, that tests were developed for, are: checking if a topic contains another one, checking if two topics are "common topics" (meaning they only differ at only one level, and are the same size), managing messages, subscribing&unsubscribing.

  • PSA: Use SASL in konversation

    You probably have seen that Freenode has been getting lots of spam lately.

    To protect against that some channels have activated a flag that only allows authenticated users to enter the channel.

    If you're using the regular "nickserv" authentication way as I was doing, the authentication happens in parallel to entering the channels and you'll probably be rejected from joining some.

Ring-KDE 3.0.0 has been released

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KDE

It has been some time. I come back from the shadows to announce the release of Ring-KDE 3.0.0, A GNU Ring.cx client. GNU Ring is a secure and distributed communication platform based on open standards. It weaves industry standard technologies to work together and provides audio calls, video conferences, chat, screen sharing and peer to peer file transfer between you and your friends. Additionally, its use of open standards allows to bridge to various other systems like the main phone network or SIP compatible devices.

When joining the GNU Ring, no servers or centralized accounts are needed. Beside an optional blockchain-based way to reserve your username against takeover, nothing leaves your device. All your data is kept under your control. Ring-KDE provides a simple wizard to help you create credentials or import your personal information from other devices.

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Also: Ring-KDE 3.0 Released To Use The GNU's Distributed Communication Platform

KDE GSoc and Akademy

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KDE

11 Best Linux Desktop Environments And Their Comparison

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME

Linux is all about what you want and having it from the ocean of free and open source software. The same applies while performing a comparison of desktop environments as they comprise of different applications and a GUI via which the user interacts with the operating system. Just like a plethora of Linux-based free operating systems, are many options available and our list of best Linux desktop environment and their comparison includes the likes of KDE, Cinnamon, Xfce, GNOME, etc.

The Linux world is full of open source software. You have the option of choosing from hundreds of distributions and customize them as per your will. No one slaps you with a copyright even if you change the source code of a distro to fork your Linux distro and release it with a new name. That’s the beauty of free software and open source. Only one thing the creators may ask you is to give them proper credits because they have also invested their efforts and time. Well, that’s a different story.

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More in Tux Machines

Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal. Read more

5 open source strategy and simulation games for Linux

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist. So, can someone who only uses free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely ever to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it. Read more

Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released
    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release. This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes. Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.
  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update
    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms. The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.
  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements
    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.
  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November
    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date. This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.
  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options
    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems. The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018. Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”
  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support
    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier. Read more