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KDE

KDE Applications 16.12.2 Rolls Out for Plasma Users to Fix over 20 Recorded Bugs

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KDE
Security

Today, February 9, 2017, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the second point release of its KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for KDE Plasma desktops.

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KDE and New Software

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KDE
Software
  • Finally, a Linux laptop worthy of KDE

    These are Macbook Air-like machines that are (as the name would imply) slim, light, and modern. The weight of Slimbook with an installed 120GB SSD, and 4GB of RAM, comes in at 1.39 kg (3.06 pounds). Considering my Chromebook Pixel 2 weighs in at 3.4 pounds, I would happily accept that encumbrance.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 – Here is the First Bugfix Release

    Today, the Kde team announced the first minor release for Kde Plasma 5.9 including various little but important bugfixes and translation updates. Certainly, this first small bugfix release will improve the stability and usability of the desktop environment.

  • Desktop Dimmer – an Open-Source Screen Dimmer App

    If you regularly work in a dark room, and find your dimmed screen is still too bright, you may want to this open-source screen dimmer app a try.

  • Kupfer Quick Launcher Ported To Python 3 And GTK 3, Sees New Release After 4 And A Half Years [PPA]

    After around 4 and a half years of inactivity, a new Kupfer (quick launcher) version was released 3 days ago, followed by 3 more releases since then.

    The application has a new developer who ported the application to Python 3, GTK 3 and GObject Introspection, while also fixing various bugs.

KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

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KDE
  • KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

    Veteran KDE developer Sebastian Kügler has written a blog post following the Plasma Sprint that just happened recently in Stuttgart. A few interesting details were shared.

    While right now we've seen some KDE efforts around Flatpak (formerly XDG-App) and Snaps along with some in the AppImage space, KDE developers are looking to center their efforts around one next-gen packaging solution moving forward. With focusing around one app bundling solution, they hope to be able to deliver their software to more end-users directly across the distribution spectrum.

  • Plasma Meeting: Web, browsers and app bundles

    This year’s Plasma Sprint is kindly being hosted by von Affenfels, a software company in Stuttgart, Germany, focusing on mobile apps. Let me try to give you an idea of what we’re working on this week.

KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, over 60 Bugs Fixed

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KDE

A few moments ago, the KDE project announced the general availability of the first point release of the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

That's right, we're talking about KDE Plasma 5.9.1, the first bugfix release to the latest stable series of the acclaimed and modern desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. This maintenance update comes only one week after the launch of KDE Plasma 5.9, and it fixes a total of 62 issues discovered or reported by users since then.

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Direct: KDE Plasma 5.9.1, Bugfix Release

Native look and feel

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KDE

We know that many Qt users want controls styled with a native look-and-feel. But offering that on platforms with no public styling API, is hard. A classic approach is to take snapshots of the native controls, tweak them, and use them as foreground or background in our own controls. Which is somewhat OK for static appearances. But when animations and transitions are involved, static pixmaps will only take you half the way. And since an OS can change style from one update to the next, taking snapshots runtime is risky. Using pre-grabbed snapshots is also something we don’t do because of legal considerations.

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KDE/Qt: PDF Module, Vaults, KDE Store

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KDE
  • New QtLabs PDF module

    A couple of years ago during a hackathon, a couple of us wrote a Qt wrapper around PDFium, the open-source PDF rendering engine which is used for viewing PDFs in Chromium. There have been a few fixes and improvements since then. Now we (finally) have made this module available under the LGPLv3 license.

  • Vaults - Encryption in Plasma

    Five years ago (I’m completely shocked how the time flies), we were working on Plasma Active, and one of the ideas was to allow the user to create private activities in which all the data would be encrypted.

    Now, while the idea itself was solid, there were big problems with its realization. There was no way to force applications to separate the configuration and other data based on whether the user is in the encrypted activity or not. Especially since the same application can run in multiple activities.

  • KDE Applications in Ubuntu Snap Store

    Following the recent addition of easy DBus service snapping in the snap binary bundle format, I am happy to say that we now have some of our KDE Applications in the Ubuntu 16.04 Snap Store.

  • Simple Menu launcher on KDE Store

    Quite a while ago already I wrote a launcher menu widget named Simple Menu. It's using the same backend I wrote for our bundled launchers, and it's a little bit like Application Dashboard scaled down into a small floating window, plus nifty horizontal pagination. It's also really simple and fast.

  • Chrome for iOS goes open source, a KDE-branded laptop, and more open source news

KDE Plasma 5.9, Wine 2.0, and PulseAudio 10 Hit openSUSE Tumbleweed's Repos

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KDE

The time has come for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system to update their systems as openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the community today, February 2, 2017, about the availability of multiple updated packages.

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KDE Plasma 5.10 Desktop and 5.9 Release

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KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.10 Desktop to Add Spring-Loading Functionality in Folder View, More

    With KDE Plasma 5.9 out the door, the KDE development team can now concentrate on adding new features or improving existing ones for the next major version of the KDE desktop environment.

    We all know how much work was done during the short development cycle of the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop, but KDE developer Eike Hein reports today on some of the hottest new features coming to the next KDE Plasma iteration.

    Spring-loading in Folder View is one of them, and will allow KDE Plasma users to navigate folders just by hovering with the mouse cursor above them during drag and drop. Check out the image and video attached below to see the functionality in action.

  • Where To Download The (Gorgeous) KDE Plasma 5.9 Wallpaper
  • KDE Plasma 5.9 released

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Neon OEM Mod…arghhh

    For years and years already Ubuntu’s installer, Ubiquity, has an OEM mode. And for years and years I know it doesn’t really work with the Qt interface.

    An understandable consequence of not actually having any real-life use cases of course, disappointing all the same. As part of the KDE Slimbook project I took a second and then a third look at the problems it was having and while it still is not perfect it is substantially better than before.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop Launches with Global Menus, Better Wayland Support

    Today, January 30, 2017, KDE had the great pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems.

    The development cycle of KDE Plasma 5.9 took only a few months, but considering the fact that it's not a long-term supported (LTS) version like KDE Plasma 5.8, which is the recommended version right now for all users, we think that it's a pretty hefty update adding quite a bunch of new features and improving Wayland support.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9 Released, This Is What’s New
  • KDE Plasma 5.9 Hits The Web With Global Menus, Better Wayland Support

    KDE Plasma 5.9 introduces interactive previews for notifications, drag-and-drop improvements throughout the desktop, window switching in the task manager using Meta + number shortcuts, Breeze styling improvements, Global Menus have returned to the KDE desktop, general theme and UI improvements, a new network configuration module, and continued work on Wayland support.

Qbs 1.7 released

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KDE

We are delighted to announce the release of Qbs 1.7 “Technical Ecstasy”!

While Qbs 1.7.0 was actually released back in mid-December, we decided to postpone the announcement until after last week’s 1.7.1 patch release in order to get in a few more bug fixes.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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