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KDE

Kdenlive 17.04.1 released

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KDE

With the ongoing refactoring at full throttle a minor bug fix released with the ability to use VAAPI in transcoding and rendering by inserting a pre-parameter in you encoding profile (refer to commit and bug report for more info), a performance improvement and some Windows version fixes.

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Also: KDE Applications 17.04 Gets First Point Release, Adds More Than 20 Bug Fixes

KDE Plasma 5.10 Will Let You Install Snaps and Flatpaks, Support GNOME's ODRS

Qt Creator 4.3 RC1 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.3 RC1.

Since the Beta release we have kept ourselves busy fixing bugs, so please take this last opportunity to test and give us feedback. Take a look at the Beta release blog post or the more detailed change log for an overview of what has changed in 4.3.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.3 RC1 Now Available For Developers

Qt 5.9 To Be An LTS Release, Qt 6 Planning On Radar

Xubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zorro - Vigorous

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KDE
Reviews

Xubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus is a pretty good release. It comes with a fully functional live session, and even the installed system offers a foxy, fair and balanced experience. You have your codecs, media support, printing, great performance, stability, and whatnot.

On the down low, the Bluetooth stack is one big disappointment, and the default looks can be improved. There were a few small issues throughout, but nothing major. What makes Xubuntu less glamorous than it should be is its brother, Kubuntu. I was so impressed with the Plasma release that I just don't have sufficient fanboyase - that's the enzyme that makes nerds go wild - in my noob glands to feel all giddy. It's a case of not being able to fall in love on the account of already being taken, so to speak.

Well, if you ignore me and my mood swings, as a standalone product, Xubuntu Zesty is a nice free offering. It's mature, robust and fast. Battery life can be better, it sure can shine more on its own without extra pimping, and Bluetooth, we go back to Bluetooth. Anyway, as far as Ubuntu and its kin go, the spring season is a pretty good one. This one gets a very juicy 9/10. And that would be all. Off you go. Play play, test test.

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • KDE FreeBSD CI

    The next-generation of KDE CI is nearly here. Ben Cooksley from the KDE Sysadmin team has announced that it is nearly ready to go. On the FreeBSD side, Ben has done the heavy lifting on the CI side and I’ve done a little futzing around to get the build node in working order by installing system-wide dependencies.

  • KDE dinner in Berlin – 13th May

    In a few days (May 13th-14th) the KDE e.V. board will be having an in-person board meeting in Berlin.

  • LaKademy 2017: expanding horizons

    On May 1, another edition of LaKademy, the Latin American KDE Summit, came to an end. This was the 5th edition of the event, which continues to attract new people interested in being part of the community. This time we had 6 beginners, which is a great number, considering that the event itself is small, since it is not an event of talks or courses, but a concentrated one, in the contribution sprint style.

  • Plasma 5.9.5 by KDE now available in Chakra

    The Plasma 5.9.5 update provides another round of bug-fixes and translations to the 5.9 release, which will probably be the last one before 5.10 is out by the end of May.

  • KIO will get Polkit support this summer

    Hello world! For those who don't know me, I am Chinmoy, a first year undergraduate student studying computer science at Dr. Ambedkar Institute of Technology, Bangalore, India. I am one of the 1,318 students selected for this years Google Summer of Code. I will be working with Arnav Dhamija and Elvis Angelaccio (my mentors) on the KDE project "Polkit Support in KIO".

  • The Craft Cache

    In the last days we created a stable Craft branch which builds Qt 5.62 and KDE Frameworks 5.33.0 (KF5), and backported all important patches for the 5.33.0 release.

    This is the branch you should use when ever you want to provide an application installer. Providing builds of unstable KF5 git versions isn't really a good practice, but was done never the less.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • How To Install Kubuntu 17.04

    This tutorial guides you to install Kubuntu 17.04 operating system step-by-step. You'll prepare a main partition, a swap partition, and do installation steps using a bootable USB drive. Kubuntu can be installed on PC and laptop, and this tutorial is applicable for both. It's easy and I hope you'll enjoy the beautiful Kubuntu 17.04 soon!

  • May updates for Plasma 5 (Slackware)

    The May 2017 updates for my ‘ktown’ repository are fairly minimal, but anyway here it is: KDE 5_17.05.
    This new release contains: KDE Frameworks 5.33.0, Plasma 5.9.5 and Applications 17.04.0. All of this is still built on top of Qt 5.7.1.

  • Qt from git on the Tinkerboard (with Wayland)
  • KDE e.V. Community 2016 Report

    The KDE e.V. community report for 2016 is now available. After the introductory statement from the Board, you can read a featured article about the 20th anniversary of KDE, and an overview of all developer sprints and conferences supported by KDE e.V. The report includes statements from our Working Groups, development highlights for 2016, and some information about the current structure of KDE e.V.

  • Kubuntu 17.10 Wallpaper Contest Begins, Submit Your Most Beautiful Photos Now

    For the first time in the history of Kubuntu, the official Ubuntu Linux flavor built around the KDE desktop environment, the development team has prepared a so-called "wallpaper contest" event.

    Following the example set by the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase movement, where a group of Ubuntu members led by Nathan Haines select some of the most beautiful wallpapers to be included in the next Ubuntu release, Kubuntu devs have also decided to do the same for the upcoming Kubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark).

Leftovers for KDE: New Video, Plasma 5.9.5, Randa Meetings 2017, and QStringView

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KDE

Meet the Slimbook Excalibur, a 15″ Aluminium Linux Laptop

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GNU
KDE
Linux

Spanish computer company Slimbook has unsheathed its latest Linux laptop — the mighty 15.6-inch Slimbook Excalibur.

Their largest laptop to date, the Excalibur is forged entirely from aluminium (think MacBook), cutting itself a prime spot alongside the more nimble 13″ Slimbook KDE laptop.

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Qt 5.9 Beta 3, KDE Neon, and Krita

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KDE
  • Qt 5.9 beta3 available

    Qt 5.9 beta3 is now available. Instructions how to get the release are here: https://wiki.qt.io/How_to_get_snapshot_via_online_installer. Diff to second beta can be found as an attachment.

  • Qt 5.9 Beta 3 Now Available

    For those looking forward to the upcoming Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, the third beta is now shipping.

    Qt release manager Jani Heikkinen has announced the Qt 5.9 Beta 3 release for testing and is encouraging users/developers to try it out to find bugs/regressions ahead of the planned release possibly at the end of May but could be delayed into June.

  • Has anyone used KDE Neon aside from myself?

    I love it so much so that it's now my daily driver (having completely erased Windows whereas I normally dual-boot).

  • Krita 3.1.3 Update Lets You Run Multiple Instances of the Digital Painting App

    Today, May 1, Krita Foundation proudly announced the release and general availability of the third maintenance update to the Krita 3.1 stable series of the open-source digital painting app for all supported platforms.

    Shipping with a ton of bug fixes, as well as a handful of cool new features, Krita 3.1.3 is here two months after the previous update to implement an option that finally allows users to run multiple instances of the app. It also implements the Cut, Copy, Paste, and Object Ordering context menu actions for the default tool.

Krita 3.1.3 Released

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KDE
  • Krita 3.1.3

    Today we’re proud to release Krita 3.1.3. A ton of bug fixes, and some nice new features as well! Dmitry and Boud have taken a month off from implementing Kickstarter features to make Krita 3.1.3 as good and solid as we could make it. Thanks to all the people who have tested the alpha, the beta and the release candidate! Thanks to all the people who have worked on translations, too, and to Alexey Samoilov for picking up the maintenance of the Ubuntu Lime PPA.

  • Open Source Graphics App Krita Sees New Bug Fix Release

    Krita, one of the most popular open-source graphics editors available, has a new release — and it's already available to install on Ubuntu.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE PIM update now available for Zesty Zapus 17.04

    As explained in our call for testing post, we missed by a whisker getting updated PIM 16.12.3 (kontact, kmail, akregator, kgpg etc..) into Zesty for release day, and we believe it is important that our users have access to this significant update.

    Therefore packages for PIM 16.12.3 release are now available in the Kubuntu backports PPAs.

  • Crazy Awesome KDE Plasma Desktop Bluetooth Audio on openSUSE

    I often hear complains of Bluetooth on Linux and how it just doesn't work well. I scratch my head as I just don't understand the problem because I just cannot relate at all. Bluetooth in Linux has been a breeze! I don't know if it is universally this easy with KDE Plasma or the way openSUSE packages it all together but of any Bluetooth enabled device I have ever used, KDE Plasma on openSUSE does it right.

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Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE