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KDE

KDE at 20: Plasma 5.8 LTS Beta. Here for the Long Term

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KDE

Thursday, 15 September 2016. Today KDE releases a beta of its first Long Term Support edition of its flagship desktop software, Plasma. This marks the point where the developers and designers are happy to recommend Plasma for the widest possible audience be they enterprise or non-techy home users. If you tried a KDE desktop previously and have moved away, now is the time to re-assess, Plasma is simple by default, powerful when needed.

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LTS releases align neatly for Plasma 5.8

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KDE

Our upcoming release, Plasma 5.8 will be the first long-term supported (LTS) release of the Plasma 5 series. One great thing of this release is that it aligns support time-frames across the whole stack from the desktop through Qt and underlying operating systems. This makes Plasma 5.8 very attractive for users need to that rely on the stability of their computers.

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7 KDE Apps You Should Know About

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KDE

KDE regularly polls as the most popular desktop environment for Linux. However, because more desktops use GNOME applications, to many users KDE might as well be a separate operating system. That is unfortunate, because some of the most feature-rich free applications are designed for KDE.

I am not referring here to utilities like the Kate text editor, the Konsole terminal, or even the Dolphin file manager. All of these are well-integrated into KDE and have all the features any user could want, but most of them are matched by GNOME counterparts. Rather, I am thinking of applications that are outstanding by any measure, the best of breed in their software categories.

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KaOS 2016.09 Is Here as the First Linux Distro to Offer KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS Beta

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OS
KDE
Linux

Today, September 13, 2016, the KaOS development team had the great pleasure of announcing the availability of a new, updated installation medium of their KaOS Linux computer operating system.

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KDE Plasma 5.7.5 Is the Last in the Series, Plasma 5.8 LTS to Land October 4

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KDE

Today, September 13, 2016, the KDE development team proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the last maintenance update to the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment series.

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KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Plasma 5.7.4 and several important package updates available in Chakra

    The latest update for KDE's Plasma series is now available to all Chakra users, together with other important package updates mostly for the core repository.

    Plasma 5.7.4 includes a month's worth of bugfixes and new translations, with the changes mostly found in the plasma desktop and workspace packages.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Gets LibreOffice 5.2.1 and KDE Plasma 5.7.4, Vulkan API Support
  • KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS Desktop to Offer a More Efficient Pager, Per-Screen Pagers

    KDE developer Eike Hein reports on various improvements to pagers that will be implemented in the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, due for release on October 4, 2016.

    We reported a couple of months ago that the next major version of the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, build 5.8, will be a long-term supported one. KDE Plasma 5.8 will also be the first LTS (Long Term Support) version of the renowned desktop interface used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems by default.

  • QtCon + Akademy 2016

    This year Akademy take place along with QtCon in Berlin, Germany. It is a year of great celebration for some free software communities, so they decided to get together to celebrate in a single event. KDE is celebrating 20 years, while VideoLAN and FSFE are celebrating 15 years. It was a historic moment and I could not miss it, so I went to Berlin for the second time (the first was to attend the Desktop Summit 2011).

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Plasma 5.8: Per-screen Pagers

    The other day I wrote about the Pager improvements awaiting in Plasma 5.8. In the comments user btin re-raised the issue of limiting the Pager's display to the screen it's currently on, instead of being all-exclusive.

    At the time I wasn't sure we could still sneak this in before feature freeze, but thanks to the screen-awareness of the new backend (which, to recap, is shared with the Task Manager and already needs to determine what screen a given window resides on), it turned out to be easy enough to do!

  • Kdenlive 16.08.1 released

    We are happy to announce a new dot release with some improvements and various fixes. We also celebrate some code contribution from Harald Albrecht (TheDive0) hoping to see more devs joining our team.

  • Akademy 2016 is over Sad
  • New features in Krita 3.0.1
  • "20 Years of KDE" book released!
  • 20 Years of KDE

    A tour through the moments that marked the 20 years of community history, starting with the technologies that made possible its existence.

  • Happy 20 Years, KDE

KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Project: Integrating Sentinel-2 data into Marble

    In conclusion the project has paved the groundwork for future efforts on Sentinel-2 data integration, which will lead to Marble Virtual Globe being the first in it’s kind to possess this quality data, it being open for users all around the world to create and develop with.

  • Embedded Notifications for Externally Modified Files

    In the past, KTextEditor notified the user about externally modified files with a modal dialog. Many users were annoyed by this behavior.

  • Kate & Akademy Awards 2016

    Dominik and me got the Akademy 2016 Award for our work on Kate and KTextEditor.

  • [Krita] Experimental OSX Build Available
  • Another Happy Birthday
  • Hello World

    I guess I should tell you all a little about myself. I learned C++ in high school computer science, but that was long ago. Since then, I have never stopped programming toys for myself and others. I have been a Linux user since around when I started in computer science and have used KDE as my main DE for just about the entire time. Around 2003, I switched to purely open source software. You see, I had always dabbled, but I just was not really ready to stop using the other proprietary operating systems. Then, in 2005, I started to become a fairly active member over at the Kubuntu forums. I started mostly doing it as a fun way to expand my knowledge base while helping others.

  • AtCore test
  • First Year As a Mentor
  • QtCon wrap up

    We had an incredible time in Berlin. First the training day by KDAB and then three conference days packed full with topics ranging from how to set up an open source organisation to fine tuning Qt graphics.

    Second. a shout out to the communities that we had the pleasure to work with to create QtCon, FSFE, KDE and VideoLAN, and of course to our partners KDAB, you guys rock!

    Last but definitely not least, Thank You obviously to all the volunteers from the different communities!

  • Day 6 at Akademy 2016
  • Back from Akademy
  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 14-Akademy Day3-4)
  • Akademy

KDE neon - Weak lighting

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KDE
Reviews

KDE neon is an interesting project. If we ignore the world, it does bring some fresh new changes into the Plasma universe, with significant improvements but also a handful of bugs and glitches. If we expand our view to include all other distributions, the scintillating allure of neon begins to fade. It does not have any killer features that make it a worthy rival to other, well-established home players.

The visual distinction from Kubuntu is a small one, the smartphone support is lacking, the media support can be slightly polished, the package manager is awful, the app layer thin, and you can't really pimp the distro because the beauty framework is utterly broken. I did like that more stuff works than before, but it's like priding yourself on getting the highest fail grade in the classroom. Overall hardware support, network excluded and resource utilizations are probably the only redeeming features, but even then, by a tiny margin. Which gets quickly drowned in the sea of bugs, errors, problems, and glitches. Samba is another sore point.

At the end of the day, this distro is a cool test bed for what Plasma has in store, but it does not have the critical mass of goodies needed for any serious use. The recent wave of distros was pretty much awful, so you might be tempted to look at them, but no. Any old Ubuntu based on 14.04 is way better, and so is the new Fedora. CentOS 7, too. In the end, neon needs a lot more work before I can phrase the word recommended in association with its behavior. Overall, 5/10. But, compare it to the K-flavored Xerus, and there's still hope. To be continued.

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KDE Frameworks 5.26.0 Improves the Breeze Icons, Plasma Framework, and Sonnet

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KDE

Today, September 10, 2016, the KDE project announced the release of the KDE Frameworks 5.26.0 collection of over 70 add-on libraries for the Qt5 GUI toolkit.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.26 Released

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  • NHS trusts are still using unsupported Windows XP PCs
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Games for GNU/Linux

Android Leftovers

Licensing resource series: Free GNU/Linux distributions & GNU Bucks

When Richard Stallman set out to create the GNU Project, the goal was to create a fully free operating system. Over 33 years later, it is now possible for users to have a computer that runs only free software. But even if all the software is available, putting it all together yourself, or finding a distribution that comes with only free software, would be quite the task. That is why we provide a list of Free GNU/Linux distributions. Each distro on the list is commited to only distributing free software. With many to choose from, you can find a distro that meets your needs while respecting your freedom. But with so much software making up an entire operating system, how is it possible to make sure that nothing nasty sneaks into the distro? That's where you, and GNU Bucks come in. Read more