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KDE

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE neon CMake Package Validation

    In KDE neon‘s constant quest of raising the quality bar of KDE software and neon itself, I added a new tool to our set of quality assurance tools. CMake Package QA is meant to ensure that find_package() calls on CMake packages provided by config files (e.g. FooConfig.cmake files) do actually work.

  • Aether Icon Theme
  • Krita 2017 Survey Results

    A bit later than planned, but here are the 2017 Krita Survey results! We wanted to know a lot of things, like, what kind of hardware and screen resolution are most common, what drawing tablets were most common, and which ones gave most trouble. We had more than 1000 responses! Here’s a short summary, for the full report, head to Krita User Survey Report.

  • Cutelyst 1.6.0 released, to infinity and beyond!

    Once 1.5.0 was release I thought the next release would be a small one, it started with a bunch of bug fixes, Simon Wilper made a contribution to Utils::Sql, basically when things get out to production you find bugs, so there were tons of fixes to WSGI module.

  • LaKademy 2017 just started!

    The Latin America KDE Summit, LaKademy, just started today in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The country is in the middle of a general strike, which I’m supporting, but the LaKademy couldn’t stop. We’ve been organizing this meeting for a year.

  • KDE Connect from the eyes of a newbie... What sorcery is this?

    Of course, I inferred it was something to connect a phone and a PC in some way and enabling the swapping of files in between the two devices, but I really did not care much about it. After all, that is what bluetooth is for, right?

    Today, I decided to give it a try on PCLOS.

  • 9 months of Atelier project, almost time to launch(or not) =D
  • Nextcloud Plugin for QuickShare

    So after a long hiatus I chose the Plasma QuickShare applet (which is sort of the Plasma5 replacement for the old Pastebin Plasmoid) as my point of re-entry into KDE code work. There was after all a deal of itches there I wanted scratched. It’s been quite a bit of fun figuring out the various interesting frameworks QuickShare is connected to at the backend. Anyways, some days ago I got a rudimentary Nextcloud plugin past review and pushed it, which should mean it’ll soon be coming to a 5.10-powered desktop near you Smile

  • QNX as a desktop operating system

    On his spare time, Elad Lahav (a kernel developer at BlackBerry) built an experimental Qt-based desktop environment to try and see if he could use QNX as a desktop operating system. And it works!

  • Performance regression testing of Qt Quick

    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.

  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
  • Give us a proper mimetype name for OpenCL C files!

    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use.

Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily.

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KDE vs. GNOME Design Philosophies

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

The days are gone when the Linux desktop was dominated almost entirely by KDE and GNOME. However, the influence of their design philosophy remains, with KDE favored by a third of users, and many modern desktop alternatives, from GNOME itself to Linux Mint’s Cinnamon and MATE using applications originally designed for GNOME. Broadly speaking, KDE’s design philosopy can be described as completist, and designed for users of all levels of experience, while GNOME’s is minimalist, and aimed particularly at new users — although all levels of users can appreciate GNOME design as well.

By “completist,” I mean that KDE applications try to include every function that could possibly be included in a task. Confusion is limited by the setting of intelligent defaults, but more functions are still visible than most everyday uses require. Perhaps the ultimate example of this design is digiKam, which over the year has calved new windows the way that polar ice caps calve glaciers.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, GNOME applications tend to include only the features for the most common use-cases. This choice makes GNOME apps easy to use, but can leave users stranded if any problems emerge. A typical example is Simple Scan, which is so uncluttered that at first it can almost seem confusing.

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Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today.

And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking?

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Kirigami 2.1

Filed under
KDE
  • Kirigami 2.1 [Ed: post removed, maybe temporarily/by accident]
  • KDE Kirigami 2.1 Released To Help Build Convergent Linux Apps

    While convergence may be dead at Ubuntu/Canonical, KDE developers continue working on Plasma Mobile and their convergence vision driven in part by the Kirigami user-interface framework.

  • Kirigami 2.1 Open-Source Framework for Convergent Mobile and Desktop UIs Is Out

    KDE's Paul Brown announced the general availability of version 2.1 of the open-source Kirigami UI framework for producing convergent user interfaces for mobile and desktop environments.

    Kirigami 2.1 is here three and a half months after the launch of Kirigami 2.0 as the project's most mature version to date. Prominent features include ItemViewHeader, a standardized title for ListViews, which can be customized with a background image that uses a parallax effect when scrolled and the header is adjusted accordingly. Multiple behaviors can be set for this component.

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • A Simple, Straightforward Clipboard Manager for GNOME

    Clipboard Manager extension for Gnome Shell is a no-frills clipboard manager for GNOME.

    It adds an indicator menu to the top panel and caches your clipboard history. There’s nothing extra; no regex searching, or cross-device, multi-sync or pan-dimensional magic. Just a simple, easy to access clipboard history.

    I’ve never been a particularly big clipboard fan. I typically only need to access whatever I copy as I copy it.

  • First GNOME 3.26 Development Release Out, Some Apps Ported to Meson Build System

    GNOME Project's Michael Catanzaro just informed us via an email announcement that the first unstable release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is out now for public testing and early adopters.

    Yes, we're talking about GNOME 3.25.1, the first development in the release cycle of GNOME 3.26, which is currently scheduled to launch later this year, on September 13. Being the first unstable release and all that, GNOME 3.25.1 doesn't ship with many changes, and you can check out the CORE NEWS and APPS NEWS for details.

  • Features To Look Forward To In Next Month's KDE Plasma 5.10

    We are just one month away from seeing the next KDE Plasma 5 desktop release.

  • User Question: With Some Free Software Phone Projects Ending, What Does Plasma Mobile's Future Look Like?

    Rosy. While it is true that Plasma Mobile used to be built on the Ubuntu Phone codebase, that was superseded some time ago. The recent events at Ubuntu and other mobile communities have not modified the pace of the development (which is pretty fast) or the end goal, which is to build frameworks that will allow convergence for all kinds of front-ends and apps on all kinds of devices.

Akademy 2018 and EuroBSDcon 2017

Filed under
KDE
BSD
  • Akademy 2018 Call for Hosts

    Akademy, KDE's annual conference, requires a place and team for the year 2018. That's why we are looking for a vibrant, enthusiastic spot in Europe that can host us!

  • EuroBSDcon 2017 Call for Proposals

    The call for Talk and Presentation proposals period will close on April 30th, 2017.

Qt 5.10 and digiKam

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Qt 5.10 Platform Support Changes Being Discussed

    Qt developers have begun a fresh round of discussions over the supported platforms / operating systems of Qt 5.10 that will be released in the later part of this calendar years.

    Among the officially supported Linux distribution changes would be moving to RHEL 7.3, openSUSE Leap 42.2, Ubuntu 17.04 (still keeping around 16.04 LTS too), moving the Windows MinGW to MinGW 6.3, and more.

  • digiKam – A Professional Photo Editing and Management Software

    digiKam is an advanced cross-platform digital photo management app inspired by photographers’ needs to view, tweak, enhance, organize, and share photographs across Linux systems.

    It possesses all the tools and feature set necessary to process, manage, organize, and transfer photographs, videos, and RAW files – while consistently receiving optimization upgrades to its feature set and workflow.

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

KDE neon Translations

Filed under
KDE

One of the best things about making software collaboratively is the translations. Sure I could make a UML diagramming tool or whatever all by my own but it’s better if I let lots of other people help out and one of the best crowd-sourcing features of open community development is you get translated into many popular and obscure languages which it would cost a fortune to pay some company to do.

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