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KDE Plasma 5.11 Enters Beta, Introduces Plasma Vault, Revamped Settings and More

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KDE

Today, the KDE project launched the Beta version of its upcoming Plasma 5.11 desktop environment for personal computers, giving the KDE community the first glimpse of what to expect from the final release later this fall.

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Plasma Mobile and Purism's Librem 5 Free Smartphone

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KDE

Purism, Todd's company, produces the Librem computers, laptops with components that, where possible, are guaranteed to be respectful of the user's privacy. Their covers sport two hardware kill-switches, for example. One shuts off the camera. The other closes down WiFi and Bluetooth.

And, although not all components are open hardware,
Purism is perfectly transparent about this, recognizes it's not ideal, and aims to replace them when it becomes possible. Purism's ultimate aim is to achieve what they call Purism Purist state, in which every single chip and board is totally free and open, with all the schematics published under a free licence.

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Also: KDE Joins Purism in an Attempt to Build World's First Privacy-Focused Smartphone

Librem 5 Smartphone Now Plans To Ship With KDE Plasma

KDE: Elisa, Randa, and Qt Con Brazil

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KDE
  • Last week development in Elisa

    I have decided to try to publish a short or not too short blog post each week some development happen in Elisa Git repository. I am inspired amongst others by the current posts about development of Kube.

    [...]

    I am still working on the notifications and a small progress has been made for the integration of visualizations when playing music.

  • Accessibility at Randa

    This year the Randa KDE meeting it’s all about Accessibility: a big effort has been concentrated around two very intertwined things: keyboard navigation and screen reader support.

  • Accessibility improvements in Randa

    Accessibility in KDE and Qt is constantly improving. Sometimes a change of scenery helps focusing and brings up productivity. Mix that with a bunch of great people and good things will start happening. It has been possible to create accessible Qt applications on Linux for a while, but of course not everything will just work out of the box untested. A while back Mario asked me to join this year’s Randa Meeting where KDE people discuss and fix issues. It turns out that was a great idea. I haven’t been able to focus much on applications and user experience lately, but with this backdrop it works

  • Discovering South America – Qt Con Brazil

    Few weeks ago I attended QtCon Brasil, an event organised by Brazilian members in the KDE Community who wanted to have an outreach event to the local technology community about Qt and beyond. It was great.

KDE: New digiKam (Version 5.7) and Randa Meeting Roundups

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KDE
  • digiKam 5.7.0 is released

    Following the release of 5.6.0 published in June, the digiKam team is proud to announce the new release 5.7.0 of the digiKam Software Collection. In this version a lot of work has happened behind the scenes and in fixing bugs, which does not mean there is no enhancements: A new tool to create print layouts has been introduces, albums can now be exported by mail, support for Hugin 2017 was added and GPS traces are storable as KML.

  • digiKam 5.7 Released With Print Creator & Email Sending Support

    For fans of the Qt-powered Digikam photo management software, the 5.7 release is out today with many bug fixes and underlying improvements along with some new user features.

  • digiKam 5.7 Image Editor Lets You Create Print Layouts, Export Albums by Email

    digiKam 5.7.0 was released today as the latest maintenance update to the open-source and cross-platform image editor, viewer and organizer software that introduces a couple of new features and many improvements.

    Two and a half months in development, digiKam 5.7.0 is here to introduce two new tools, namely "Send by Mail" and "Print Creator." The first one will allow users to send photos by email directly from the app, supporting popular email clients like Mozilla Thunderbird, Evolution, KMail, Claws Mail, Sylpheed, Balsa, and Netscape.

  • Randa Roundup - Part II

    The last time we wrote about Randa Meetings 2017, preparations for the event were still in progress. The developer sprint is now in full swing. Everyone is settled in and ready to start improving, debugging and adding features to KDE's apps and frameworks. But what exactly will the developers work on during Randa 2017? Here are some more details.

    As you're probably already aware, the theme of Randa Meetings 2017 is accessibility. This doesn't include only desktop software, but also extends to mobile apps. Sanjiban Bairagya is working on the Marble Maps Android app, KDE's answer to Google Earth. His accessibility-related tasks include making the turn-by-turn navigation experience more visually intuitive in real-time. He will also be switching Marble to the Qt 5.8 Speech module instead of using Java for text-to-speech support in navigation. Another thing Sanjiban wants to do is find a way to let users add notes to any place on the map.

  • Take Randa and Stuff It

    (O yeah, lunch was pretty expansive and tasty, so we’re stuffed. And in Randa.)

KDE: Latte Dock, New Plasma 5 for Slackware, and Kubuntu Council Election Results

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KDE
  • Intro to Latte Dock, New Decoration for Kubuntu

    Latte is a new MacOS-like dock desktop decoration for KDE Plasma. It's first released in 14 January 2017 as v0.5.90. It's now installable for Kubuntu from PPA (and other distros via specific channels). If you're a Kubuntu user and waiting for a decent dock, or if you missed the legendary AWN dock, then Latte is for you. This article will show you some pictures (and GIF) and features of Latte. Enjoy!

  • Plasma 5 for Slackware – KDE 5_17.09

    For some time now, no news about Plasma 5 for Slackware appeared on this blog. I just have been too occupied with family life and the demands of my day job.

    But the configuration of my new server, the one I bought last month, finally is at a point where I can use it for running virtual machines and compiling packages. And it is fast… compiling LibreOffice in 90 minutes where in the past it would take me 10 times as long. Therefore I was able to create a new release of Plasma 5 packages while at the same time working on new LibreOffice packages.

  • Kubuntu Council Election Results Announced

    The Kubuntu Council is happy to announce the results of the election, and welcome the following members: Rik Mills, Aaron Honeycutt (returning) and Rick Timmis.

KDE: Kirigami Framework and KDE Applications 17.08

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KDE
  • KDE Frameworks Now Shipping with Kirigami Framework for Building Convergent UIs

    After launching the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite, the KDE project announced this week the release of KDE Frameworks 5.38.0, the monthly update to the open-source collection of add-on libraries for the latest Qt 5 technologies.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Gets First Point Release, More Than 20 Bugs Got Squashed

    Right on the schedule, the latest stable KDE Applications 17.08 software suite got its first point release, versioned 17.08.1, this week, fixing more than 20 recorded bugs and improving support for several KDE apps.

    As expected, KDE Applications 17.08.1 is a bug fix release, addressing various of the bugs, crashes, and other issues reported by users since the launch of the KDE Applications 17.08 stable series in mid-August 2017. Numerous KDE apps received improvements, including bug not limited to Akonadi, Minuet, Akregator, Kdenlive, Ark, Cantor, Cervisia, Gwenview, JuK, Umbrello, Okular, Konsole, and Kontact.

Best KDE Linux Distributions For Your Desktop, Quick Look at Next Kubuntu, and Randa

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KDE
  • Best KDE Linux Distributions For Your Desktop

    best kde linux distributions for your desktop
    KDE remains one of the most popular desktop environments available for Linux users. KDE prioritizes aesthetics and modernity with a user-friendly computing experience. It also comes with a host of applications and features that complete the experience. But which distro does KDE best? I certainly do not know the right answer but what I can do is share some of KDE's best distros in the market now. Some distros certainly do KDE better than others and if you’ve been burnt before, I bet one of these might change your mind. In no particular order, let’s go.

  • Quick Look at Kubuntu Artful Pre-Release

    This is Kubuntu 17.10 Beta 1 "Artful Aardvark", a pre-release version available for development/testing purpose. For you regular users, you are not supposed to install Beta 1 version, unless you want to simply try it and report bugs to Kubuntu Developers. For you not installing I made this short review to see how amazing Kubuntu Artful is already!

  • ERR (En Route to Randa)

    I’m happy to see KDEnlive Joseph and Grace again, and the PIM dudes (although they seem to have slunk off to one of the meeting rooms for Serious Talks already).

    Tomorrow starts at 7:02, when I have kitchen duty to roll out breakfast for 20-or-so Free Software hackers who are hungry from the fresh mountain air, and then after that it’s time to self-organize and sit down to work.

KDE: Fedora's KDE Spin and Upcoming Randa Meetings 2017

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KDE
  • Is Fedora's KDE Spin Too Bloated?

    This weekend on the Fedora mailing list a debate has begun over whether Fedora's KDE desktop spin is too bloated and what could be done about it.

    As most longtime Linux users know, Fedora is mostly centered around the GNOME Shell desktop with its Fedora Workstation, but it does have a vibrant community of maintainers keeping the Fedora KDE spin among other desktop spins active.

    Initiated this weekend on the Fedora development list is a debate about A less "bloated" KDE spin.

  • Randa Meetings 2017: Everything is ready

    Yesterday we went shopping to nourish some Free Software enthusiasts next week.

KDE: Kate & KDevelop, Google Summer of Code Certificate (digiKam), and KBibTeX Progress

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KDE
  • In-pane preview of Qt UI files with KUIViewer coming up

    The “Live Preview” plugin for the editors/IDEs Kate & KDevelop (see introduction) makes use of KParts plugins to support different file formats. Thus it can also pick up the range of existing KParts implementations out there right from the start.

  • Google Summer of Code Certificate

    I just received my certificate of completion and very proud of contributing to digiKam in KDE this summer, and grateful to Google, the people of KDE and my mentors for making this possible.

  • KBibTeX 0.7-beta1

    After some delay, I am finally pushing forward towards a final release of KBibTeX for KDE 4. The first step is the tagging and releasing of tar balls for version 0.7's Beta 1.

KDE and GNOME: Developing KDE PIM with Docker, GObject Introspection, GNOME 3.26 Days Away

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KDE
GNOME
  • Developing KDE PIM with Docker

    Getting started with contributing to KDE PIM can be hard – we have nearly 60 repositories with complicated dependencies – just getting that right can discourage many people from even trying. And then there’s, of course, the risk factor of running development build alongside your production Kontact, endangering your precious emails.

    To address all these issues I have created a Docker image. It’s based on the KDE Neon Developer edition and it has all the dependencies pre-installed and pre-configured and comes with a set of handy shell scripts to make your life easier. It also has the environment set up properly so that you can run the development build of Kontact inside of the container – completely isolated from your production installation.

    Interested now? Follow the instructions how to build the Docker image and how to run the container on our KDE PIM Docker wiki page.

  • The Magic of GObject Introspection

    When we started GNOME in 1997, we didn't want to write all of it in C. We had some inspiration from elsewhere.

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  • Approaching 3.26

    So, we're on final stretch towards the GNOME 3.26 release next week, just released the last beta of Maps (3.25.92) earlier in the week. This cycle hasn't seen that any real ground-breaking user-visible changes. But various smaller bugfixes. Nevertheless there's been a few nice improvements on the surface (as seen in earlier blogposts).

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.